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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Need shielding work on my stock 2012 Am Std Tele? Single coil hum issue

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by bonzo898, Feb 1, 2017.

  1. bonzo898

    bonzo898 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    36
    25
    Sep 19, 2016
    Houston, TX
    Hey all, I'm reaching out to those with technical/modding experience to ask two questions relating to a minor problem with my 2012 Am Std Tele.

    The guitar sounds great except in certain spots the single coil hum is really bad with anything other than clean tones. Mild and moderate overdrive causes major noise. My band played a show on a relatively small stage recently and it was so bad I pretty much abandoned any overdriven tones. I'm fairly certain it's not my pedals/amp/cables because I have humbucker guitars and a Strat with Lace sensor single coils and I don't have noise issues with any of them.

    I love the guitar and want to keep using it as my main live instrument but I've got to deal with this hum issue. I'm thinking I may need to do some shielding work on the inside of the pickguard and/or cavities.

    1. Any suggestions on a quick fix that even a tech noob like me can handle? Maybe a good video walkthrough?
    2. What does Fender USA typically do on the front end (if anything) during the building process to minimize hum issues?

    Thanks
     

  2. SPUDCASTER

    SPUDCASTER Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Boy, did you just open a big ol' can-o-worms.

    You're going to get a plethora of opinions on this.

    Personally, I've only ever shielded the control cavity. I do have one guitar that came with full shielding paint and Fender noiseless pickups.

    Can I tell the difference? Not really. And I do play in various venues that may or may not have the best electrical wiring. Some only have two prong outlets.

    Make sure the wiring, in your guitar is all up to par. Then I would shield the control cavity first. Try that.

    Then proceed from there if needed. Have fun and good luck.
     
    NilsZippo likes this.

  3. bonzo898

    bonzo898 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    36
    25
    Sep 19, 2016
    Houston, TX
    W

    Thanks for the tips, much appreciated
     

  4. BartS

    BartS Friend of Leo's

    Feb 18, 2013
    St. louis MO
    What spudscaster said. Make sure the bridge,pickups and everything is grounded properly and wired right and get some sheilding tape. Fender Uses shielding paint I believe. Personly I tape my guitars. Just so I can see a nice clean solder making contact from the shielding to the ground and magically shielding tape works better.
     

  5. Owensv

    Owensv TDPRI Member

    36
    Dec 22, 2012
    Canton, OH
    All the above is correct, and I would add one additional trick I have used that made an appreciable difference in my vintage coil pickups. Without going into the science of it, suffice to say that if you tightly twist the leads of the wires from your pickups along their entire length (i.e., make the signal and ground wires of each pickup a tight spiral), you will minimize the amount of noise coupled into the circuit. Do this with your output leads, also. I also make sure my eventual ground point for ALL ground wires is at a single spot, like the volume pot.
     

  6. 3CardMonty

    3CardMonty TDPRI Member

    51
    Jul 13, 2015
    South Jersey
    I have actually had success by shielding the inside cavity of the pickup covers with cheap ole Aluminum foil doubled-up. It makes the sound a little fatter, but cuts down on the hum by about 80%. Cheaper than a set of noiseless pickups.
     

  7. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

    Shielding does nothing. It's the pickups and imperfect wiring that ultimately lead to noise.

    When I build a guitar, there isn't any noticeable hum of any kind.

    There's one big mistake people often make when soldering.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2017

  8. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 29, 2013
    NYC
    What is it?
     

  9. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

    Having multiple grounding points in your wiring schematics.
     

  10. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 29, 2013
    NYC
    Thank you. The suspense was killin' me.
     
    flyingbanana likes this.

  11. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

    I bet. There is a trick to it. That part will cost you though. :D

    I was wiring the guitars I built and sold the standard ways for a few years, but through trial and error, I improved on things so much so, that I no longer apply any shielding.
     

  12. Bartholomew3

    Bartholomew3 Friend of Leo's

    Dec 8, 2010
    Montreal
    Electro-Harmonix hum debugger. I thought they might suck out the tone but have been told they work really well.
     

  13. Raimonds

    Raimonds Tele-Meister

    Age:
    46
    328
    Dec 1, 2014
    Latvia
    this isnt problem in guitar circuit.
     

  14. Raimonds

    Raimonds Tele-Meister

    Age:
    46
    328
    Dec 1, 2014
    Latvia
    Shielding does something to noise, if the shielding is done properly then you will have less noise. You can hear this in the video:
     

  15. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

    You are incorrect. Having ground loops in any situation is bad. At least in guitar wiring, you don't run the risk of death because voltages are low.

    But when you set up wiring in a guitar to shunt ground energy to multiple locations, you end up creating noisy electronics, because the ground energy does not know where to go, so it enters the signal path. ;)

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_loop_(electricity)
     

  16. Raimonds

    Raimonds Tele-Meister

    Age:
    46
    328
    Dec 1, 2014
    Latvia
    First of all, you need two circuits to get the ground loop, check the first diagram in the wiki. In guitar (normally) you have one active signal source, that could be e.g. V1 from the diagram, to get ground loop you need V2.
    Anyways, at the end of the day, all guitar ground wires terminate at the output socket and create star ground :)
     
    FirTrader likes this.

  17. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Meister

    353
    May 28, 2008
    netherlands
    as far as i know Bill Lawrence said there are no ground loops in a passive guitar circuit.
    don 't use kitchen alu foil but thin alu foil with a sticky back. ground the pots with wire to, the alu tape has some resistance so the more contact the better the ground and no resistance. keep some free space around the switch blade so it won 't touch the alu tap and create a kill switch. and check no hot leads touch the alu foil when placing the pickguard back (strat)
     

  18. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

    Smiley faces aside, you are still incorrect, and are spreading false info. I have built and sold dozens of guitars with the wiring set up this way, and have received so much positive feedback, (pardon the pun) that they ask me if I installed noiseless pickups.
     

  19. Raimonds

    Raimonds Tele-Meister

    Age:
    46
    328
    Dec 1, 2014
    Latvia
    Thats pretty cool!
    There are some laws in radioelectronics which are working regardless of your believes. You still need two signal sources to get ground loop.
     
    chezdeluxe and FirTrader like this.

  20. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

    :rolleyes:
     

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