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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Neck questions

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by TeleTaktix, Sep 20, 2017.

  1. TeleTaktix

    TeleTaktix TDPRI Member

    Age:
    28
    4
    Sep 13, 2017
    Miami
    So i am bumping heads with someone who i am asking for help to remove the polyurethane from the fingerboard of my tele, he says removing the poly from the neck will affect the tone of my guitar, i say it doesnt matter and would like to proceed. does anyone have an idea if it does or doesnt? And if anyone has a way to remove the poly safely without some crazy technical stuff going on just in case im right and he still refuses to help?
     

  2. TeleTaktix

    TeleTaktix TDPRI Member

    Age:
    28
    4
    Sep 13, 2017
    Miami
    Also the guy said it will warp the neck to remove the poly on the fingerboard, which is absolute nonsense in my opinion, makes me wonder why im asking the guy to remove the poly in yhe first place
     

  3. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Poster Extraordinaire

    Mar 27, 2011
    Parts Unknown
    Ask the Tone Wood Dept. :twisted:
     
    Felino and Ripradiant like this.

  4. awasson

    awasson Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    53
    Nov 18, 2010
    Vancouver
    It's psychology... If you think the poly affects the tone, it will. If it were me, I'd keep some sort of protection on the fretboard because I don't like that stained relic maple fretboard look but i wouldn't expect to hear a difference in tone. The idea that it would warp is nonesense.
     

  5. tonejam

    tonejam Tele-Meister

    353
    Dec 25, 2010
    brisbane
    the poly helps keep moisture (like your sweat) out of the wood, that may be his reasoning about warping. That said, you'd have to sweat a lot, I'm thinkin'..
     

  6. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    42
    Mar 17, 2003
    albany, ny [not chicago]
    he may be making things up because he doesn't want to, or it could be legit. If he's planning on using heat to remove the poly (which is the easiest and cleanest), then he may be right. Using a chemical stripper would also work, but it will be messy it's easy to stain the wood that way. Sanding it all off is super labor intensive.

    The poly used in guitars isn't sticky by itself. It feel that way because it's super glossy, so there's a lot of surface friction. This could be remedied by sanding it down with 000 steel wool or 400 grit paper to knock the gloss off.

    Are you really feeling stickiness on the fretboard? Most folks don't unless the frets are super low.
     

  7. sothoth

    sothoth Tele-Meister

    308
    Nov 24, 2010
    Kepler-186f
    I'm curious how companies that sell relic'd guitars (e.g. Nash) selectively remove the finish and if they do some other treatment of the bare wood? Personally, I LOVE the feel of a smooth maple fretboard with no finish. I find it hard to believe that the finish does a whole lot in terms of changing the wood. I live in a fairly moist climate and have never had issues with the unfinished ones, especially no bending or bowing or anything drastic. Seems like it's just a personal preference one way or the other.
     

  8. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    42
    Mar 17, 2003
    albany, ny [not chicago]
    First, they use nitro and often apply it very thin, so it takes less solvent or sanding to remove it. Second, it's desirable for the wood on a relic to be stained somewhat.
     

  9. Ripradiant

    Ripradiant Tele-Holic

    845
    Jul 31, 2014
    Alberta Canada
    Utter nonsense! I think you had better hire someone who knows what they are talking about and who is up for the job...or better yet do it yourself. Teles are not fragile highly sensitive precision instruments - they are basic chunks of wood fastened together with pretty much home construction grade hardware.
     
    bob barcus and awasson like this.

  10. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    42
    Mar 17, 2003
    albany, ny [not chicago]
    I'm going to disagree with you here. A few thousandths of an inch here or there can make a significant difference in the feel and playability. In that regard, all guitars are precision machines.
     
    ponce likes this.

  11. Ripradiant

    Ripradiant Tele-Holic

    845
    Jul 31, 2014
    Alberta Canada
    Lets not split hairs. I don't think you would turn down a 50s tele because all of the finish has worn off the neck...or, because it might warp or wont sound good! For the purposes of the OP's concern (which is removing of finish) I still say it makes no difference whatsoever.
     

  12. awasson

    awasson Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    53
    Nov 18, 2010
    Vancouver
    Not when I'm the one playing, they aren't :lol:
     

  13. Tonetele

    Tonetele Friend of Leo's

    Jun 2, 2009
    South Australia
    Consider a violin. Typically a Rosewood or Ebony fingerboard. No gloss spray etc. Think about that and you'll answer your own question.
     
    bob barcus likes this.

  14. jvin248

    jvin248 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 18, 2014
    Near Detroit, MI
    .

    I'd use 800 grit sandpaper to give the fretboard and neck the satin feel. You can do this yourself rather than hire it out. It can also be reversed if you or the next buyer ever wants to go back to gloss. Strip it down and your guitar is worth half what it is now.

    If you have a fleet of guitars, compare how the rosewood fretboard necks bend more with the seasonal humidity changes than the maple+coated necks bend (truss rod adjustments). How the unfinished rosewood will be more out of tune in a week than the maple+coated one. It's an issue but your guy has the incorrect reason.

    I need truss rod adjustments around here twice a year (seasons and these big lakes) and I don't have the southern humidity you have near the ocean. Try using the sandpaper first and play that for a while.

    .
     

  15. ThreePeace

    ThreePeace Tele-Meister

    188
    Sep 21, 2012
    Ohio
    I have a 75 Tele Custom. It was in dire need of a refret. I gave it to a local luthier, Mark Kaiser to do the work. I also asked him if he could remove the finish from the neck and fingerboard. Fender necks always to get sticky for me when gigging. He sanded the neck and fingerboard down to bare wood then finished it with a light coat of oil. The guitar has never played or sounded better than it does now after the work.
     

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