Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Mohawk pre-cat laquer?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by old wrench, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Meister

    Regarding Mohawk's "pre-catalyzed" laquer in the rattle-can, what the heck is it? I'm familiar with some of the 2K automotive type finishes where your dealing with two separate components, but what does pre-catalyzing do for laquer? How does it differ from other rattlecan laquers that aren't touted as being "pre-cat"?

    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     

  2. Kennedycaster

    Kennedycaster Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 5, 2009
    Mesa, AZ
    I use Mohawk pre-catalyzed lacquer daily in my furniture restoration business. They are nitrocellulose lacquer with an acid catalyst for added durability. You use the same additives that you normally use in standard nitrocellulose lacquer. It sprays the same. It wetsands/buffs/polishes the same. One big difference is that you cannot make your colors with pre-cat. The acid content is too high & your tints & pigments won't mix. The best solution is to make your colors with vinyl sealer & use pre-cat only for topcoats.

    Bob
     
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  3. Kennedycaster

    Kennedycaster Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 5, 2009
    Mesa, AZ
    I will also add that Mohawk is hands down the best finishing products I have ever used & I've used nearly all other brands of both consumer & commercial products. This includes their aerosols, which spray better than any others I've used. You can't go wrong with Mohawk. I need the best possible products I can get, my business depends on it. I use Mohawk products exclusively.

    Bob
     
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  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    The catalyst is "kicked" by oxygenation. There is no oxygen in the can - as soon as the material hits air it starts to kick off and continues on the substrate. The tiny bit of activation between tip and surface is enough to start the chemical reaction in areas of the film not directly exposed to the air.

    They don't necessarily dry any faster; it depends on the chemistry. But they do dry with a bit more abrasion resistance while retaining the flexibility (or close to it) of the non-catalyzed version.

    I use those clears any time I have a small, quick project that doesn't warrant firing up my spray equipment.
     
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  5. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Meister

    Thanks very much for the clear explanations, guys!

    I ordered some of the Mohawk sealer, a couple of different cans of toner and a few cans of the clear laquer finish - but it's all rattlecans. The cost of those cans add up fast, I could buy a quart of laquer for about the same price as 3 spray cans.

    I've been dragging my feet as far as firing up my spray equipment for finishing guitars. I've done some motorcycle paint work with mostly acrylic enamels; some of them topped with a catalyzed urethane clear, and a couple of jobs using 2K paint all the way (epoxy primer/color coat/clear coat), but my guitar work so far has been limited to stuff I can apply with a rag or brush, mainly shellacs and TruOil, sometimes using techniques I learned about on this forum. My curiousity has always kept me pretty busy, I'm convinced that I'll never run out of new stuff to learn about. This forum has been a generous source of real help for me. Thanks again!

    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     

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