Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

milk paint teles!

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by ndcaster, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. ndcaster

    ndcaster Friend of Leo's

    Nov 14, 2013
    Indiana
    anybody have a milk paint tele out there?
     

  2. brewsterallen

    brewsterallen Tele-Meister

    330
    Jul 14, 2010
    Road Eyelend
    Milky goodness.
     

    Attached Files:

    src9000 and Gibson like this.

  3. ndcaster

    ndcaster Friend of Leo's

    Nov 14, 2013
    Indiana
    cool, is that a wash?
     

  4. gnuyork

    gnuyork TDPRI Member

    83
    Apr 20, 2014
    GA
    I'm doing a white wash (have been for a while now, I'm such a procrastinator). I have a first coat. In fact mine's a snake head esquire as well (like the above photo). I plan to shellac it after the stain.
     

  5. brewsterallen

    brewsterallen Tele-Meister

    330
    Jul 14, 2010
    Road Eyelend
    It's a powder, just add water, mix, and apply. I used a foam brush and topped with Tung Oil. I bought the powder from a website that caters to wood finishers. I bought a bag , enough for 1000 guitar bodies. I think I over bought.
     

  6. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    54
    Feb 16, 2014
    Auburn, California
    I really like that. My MIM Cabronita looks similar - translucent white where you can still see the wood grain. Love it.
     

  7. Obsessed

    Obsessed Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Nov 21, 2012
    Montana
    My wife just removed a few layers of paint from a circa 1890 oak cabinet with paint stripper. What's left was the original milk paint that looks really cool, but more solid than a "wash". Very hardy stuff. Could look very cool with a relic finish.
     

  8. neatone

    neatone Tele-Holic

    567
    Feb 23, 2007
    ca

  9. MickM

    MickM Friend of Leo's Ad Free + Supporter

    Looks like what was once called pickled pine. Looks great on a Tele!
     

  10. Obsessed

    Obsessed Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Nov 21, 2012
    Montana
    My wife has done pickled pine and real milk paint (not on guitars). I think pickled pine would look better because of the grain showing better. FWIW.
     

  11. ndcaster

    ndcaster Friend of Leo's

    Nov 14, 2013
    Indiana
    I'm thinking vintage white and a black bakelite pickguard. Looks great with shiny steel. Nothing fancy, this'll be a workhorse guitar.

    Amber tinted neck arrived, a fat C from Allparts.

    The pine body from Clearfork is perfect.
     

  12. AlterEgo

    AlterEgo Tele-Meister

    243
    Apr 8, 2014
    Portland, ME
    Here are a couple that I did with limestone based milk paint a little while back. Milk paint is great to work with but just like anything has it quirks.
     

    Attached Files:

    GreggBates, Felino, Scrapperz and 6 others like this.

  13. ndcaster

    ndcaster Friend of Leo's

    Nov 14, 2013
    Indiana
    ridiculously cool

    can you describe the process for those?
     

  14. AlterEgo

    AlterEgo Tele-Meister

    243
    Apr 8, 2014
    Portland, ME
    Thanks! I should note that some of the ability to get this finish is the pine used is 125 years old. Because if y that the areas with less density to the fibers are softer than the heart of the grain so if you sand it with a pad with a soft backing it wears down the grain unevenly. Base colors are put on, then with a firm level block I sand it so it keeps the lower spots retaining the color and higher spots sand to bare wood. Apply the second color then soft block it again. Then give it a good wipe down with a damp sponge to soften the contrast between the colors. Then three coats of tru oil to warm up the look of the exposed grain. Level sand, grain fill everything nice and flat and then clear on top. It's labor intensive but the end result I think is worth it
     

  15. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Holic

    643
    May 31, 2014
    austin
    These are really awesome looking. I love the look of the hardware. I have the same antique brass hardware from eyguitaron the first partscaster I did. Unfortunately I managed to bend the bridge somehow and now I can't use it because it is microphonic no matter what I do.

    when you say a soft backed sanding block, do you mean the sanding sponges from lowes or home depot? I have found the fator brand from liwes to be pretty good.

    have you had any luck on newer pine?

    Could you possibly give a touch more derail on this part of your process?
     

  16. AlterEgo

    AlterEgo Tele-Meister

    243
    Apr 8, 2014
    Portland, ME
    I don't typically use the sanding sponges because I find the quality of sandpaper on them inferior however that is roughly how firm a backing you'd use. I actually have stumbled upon this by mistake when attempting to power sand an old piece of wood. Although the power sander had a firm back as most do it resulted in a very uneven surface. From there it was just a matter of reproducing it with the control of sending by hand. I would imagine you would get the same effect sanding Newer pine or any softwood with a wide grain profile. It is just a little more magnified on old pine. A word of note if you were trying to reproduce that, sand with the grain. The end result of the look itself is just as much that process of creating an uneven grain as it is the time investment it takes to apply and sand off most of each coat. The guitars pictured were not my first attempts at this look. Because of demand I've done a couple dozen guitars in that style. I refuse to do "relic" finished guitars. In my opinion that style is reserved for people who don't know how to actually produce a quality finish! The exposed areas on these is made to accentuate the natural character of the wood, not a worn down beat up look. I only mention that to express the mindset in approach hence why my sanding process is what it is. Its just about creating contrast within the natural look of the grain. PS when using real limestone based milk paint you can get some really interesting hairline cracking of the paint by force drying it with a heat gun. Low setting and about two feet away keeping it moving as to not heat up one spot too much. If you like that look, that's how you get it. If you don't like that look, beware of trying to force dry it. Milk paint is fickle like that more than just about any other product ive used. I apologize for the wordy post but hope I answered your question.
     
    McCart and ndcaster like this.

  17. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Holic

    643
    May 31, 2014
    austin
    For sure. I for one appreciate a nice thought out response with lots of info. Much appreciated.
     

  18. AlterEgo

    AlterEgo Tele-Meister

    243
    Apr 8, 2014
    Portland, ME
    Sleazy, curious if you ever gave it a shot with that new pine? I'm finishing up another reclaim one right now, I'll toss a photo up at some point.
     

  19. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Holic

    643
    May 31, 2014
    austin
    Yes and no. I really like the sanding sponges from lowes, I think it is gator brand. After reading this thread I used a 150 and a 180 sponge and sanded only with the grain. Not sure if that was mentioned in your post, but want to make sure it is.
    I could definitely tell that there was some offset between the lighter and darker grain. Not so much in that I could really feel it, but in the color the grain took on. I cant really explain it, but it was pretty clear what you were talking about was starting to happen.
    I didnt push it to far because I was using a different finish than milk paint, but could def see it starting to happen.
    You were right about the labor intensive part. Have you thought about using alchohol to speed up the process by raising the grain?
    I am experimrnting with a flooring finish, its basically a paste wax suspended in liquid form. Rubio monocoat. You cant use naptha to clean the wood after sanding, so I used alcohol. Maybe if that was used sparingly it could speed the process.
     

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