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Mike Bloomfield Telecaster template

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Marn99, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County

    This is a body ( or what's left of it) I have. The image was taken today.
     
    Marn99 likes this.

  2. PCollen

    PCollen Tele-Afflicted

    May 7, 2010
    Man of the World
    Comment removed out of respect for Marn99 in following his dream.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2017

  3. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    431
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Huh, is yours going to have the missing upper bout too? Is there anything about the specs that I haven't covered yet that he told you?
     

  4. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    431
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Hey if you don't have a use for it.....:lol::lol::lol: just kidding, I have a nightmare 1980s Korean Kay classical restoration on my hands right now, what finish did Kay use back then???? It needs two applications of methylene chloride to go through the it! how in the world did you find that tele body?
     

  5. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    431
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    No worries, I understand that this guitar has seen some rough times and shows some scars that may not appeal to everyone. I certainly have made my fair share of comments I regret, in fact, a thread about gibson comes to mind.....Part of the reason I am making one replica with the removed bout is because I write left handed but I can play ambidextrously, my right hand being stronger but my left hand capable of playing rhythm and chords.
     

  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    A local Flea Market in the mid 90's. It was put together as a travel guitar.
     

  7. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Prove the naysayers wrong. The aesthetics are subjective, but if you pull off a beautiful replica job the results will speak for themselves - no one can argue with that. So steam ahead - I'm looking forward to seeing some chips fly. Relax and enjoy it!
     

  8. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Also, the 'clay' dot and laminated neck debacle reminded me of a feature I read last week in Historic Hardware by Guitarist mag: it was a review of an original 63 fiesta red strat...

    IMG_1361.JPG

    IMG_1359.JPG
     

  9. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    431
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    So Muzikp, I know you were eager to see what I came up with in terms of making the radiused fingerboard, and here is what I came up with. I still have zero idea how it was done at Fender, based on the thickness it could have easily been done with steam bending OR sawing (anyone know someone who worked there when they did the veneer fingerboards?), but here is what I have. It is a table saw jig that, using a very thin kerfed saw, follows a fence and cuts a slab of rosewood at a high angle where the top of the cut is the centerline. You then flip the wood and jig onto the other side of the saw and what you get is several chevron shaped pieces of rosewood that can be sanded 7 1/4 concave on the top, and sanded 7 1/4 convex on the back, thus reducing the amount of rosewood that would be wasted from radiusing. what you would get is two strips at the top that would be scrap (inlay perhaps?) and one slab board at the bottom, the rest would be veneer style. Sorry the drawing of the jig is crooked, just know that the line spanning the bottom is the bed of a table saw and it is supposed to be 90 degrees. below that is what the view would be from the end grain of the slab being cut.
    Sawing jig.PNG
    slab & veneer cut.png
     

  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I'll just throw this out there. If I were to do this, I would make a simple swing arm to hold a router and make essentially a radius sanding beam, but use a rosewood fretboard instead of some maple or other hardwood. Then sand the same radius into the maple for the glue joint. Then, I'd glue the fretboard on, and then radius the other side with a sanding beam.

    see post 26 here

    http://www.tdpri.com/threads/another-fretboard-radius-jig.363569/page-2


    As always, try it on cheap wood first. In 1966 or so they changed from Brazilian to Indian rosewood. The veneer fretboards were in use until about 1983 from what I read.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2017
    Muzikp, jamorudd and adirondak5 like this.

  11. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

    Dec 9, 2011
    Rochester, NY
    As to how the boards were made see below.

    If you are concerned about not wasting rosewood, you should just cut the slabs to thickness off the stock with a bandsaw (which will have an even thinner kerf than the table saw blade) and then just proceed as Marty described above.

    http://www.fenderforum.com/forum.html/searchthreadgateway.php?topic_number=784656

    "
    Hello Manny. Welcome to the Fender Forum.

    The "curved board" was milled on its' underside to match the radius of the maple.Mr. George Fullerton describes this in more than one interview.The reason for the curve board was to eliminate issues with slab-boards creating a twist in the maple/rosewood assembly,due to the rosewood having a controlling effect.This issue was compounded by the use of curve bottom fret slots also,hence reducing the kerfing effect that fretslots have.Despite that,the curve board continued with the constant depth curved bottom fret slot,probably due to the use of the swing arm fret slotting gang saws.
    This radius was approximately 7-1/4".

    The curve board was not heat bent or veneered.
    The curve board was introduced in mid-1962.
    To begin with the curve board was quite thick.
    Around a year later,the thickness seemed to standardise at approximately 100 thousandths of an inch.
    Fret slots still followed the radius of the board and were therefore of constant depth.
    Fretwire in pre-cbs days was:
    .041" crown height.
    .078" crown width.
    .019" tang width.
    .031"-.035" stud to stud width.
    .050" tang deth.
    Manufacturing tolerance applies.

    Make the maple neck,and install the trussrod from the topside of the maple.Use a maple fillet.
    Ensure no glue can enter at end of fillet near neck heel when board is glued on.Make sure trussrod is waxed also,before gluing in fillet.
    Thickness of maple must allow for the addition of the rosewood board so that finished thickness is one inch.

    To create the curved underside:
    First you need to make yourself a sanding block with a 7-1/4" convex radius.
    So: Use a standard radius block,or sanding beam
    to create this in an identical size block of wood.
    Maple or white oak is good.
    It needs to be stable in its' grain orientation just like the Kanna.
    A good length for this convex block is 18".
    Use a jig (sanding box) for this.
    Now check carefully with radius gauge the entire length of the new block you have created.
    The two blocks,one concave,and the new one you have made convex,should fit together,just like fitting a blade in the plane...
    Using the sanding box or jig of choice,and the newly made convex block,sand the radius into the underside of the rosewood billet.Do not radius the top of the rosewood yet.
    Make the radius on the maple with the concave block that you used to make the convex block.
    Check for fit.There must be no "hollow gaps" between the two surfaces.
    Glue and clamp.No tension or pressure should be needed to "close" any gap. Ensure no gaps before gluing!
    Proceed to trim board and sand in the radius on top of rosewood.Dish out the headstock to final thickness with the curve between the nut area and the headstock surface.
    It is best to cut fretslots after top radius is made on the rosewood.Curved board is only 100 thou thick,about 2.5mm.
    You could make the board a little thicker,like the early curve boards,say,3.0 mm.

    The finished thickness of the neck should be ONE INCH. Therefore,you must allow for thickness of the board when making the thickness of the maple.

    Keep the TWO radius blocks together,as they are MATCHED and will be useful for the next neck that is made this way.

    Uncle Stack-Knob.


    (This message was last edited by uncle stack-knob at 05:17 AM, Mar 18th, 2013)

    "
     
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  12. adamsappel

    adamsappel Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    Age:
    51
    310
    Jun 8, 2008
    Maryland
    GE Smith plays Mike Bloomfield's Tele:

     
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  13. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Tele-Holic Ad Free + Supporter

    702
    Jun 17, 2008
    omaha
    Musikraft offers a veneer fingerboard as an option. They might share some of their methods with you?

    I have an old duo sonic neck is dated 1964 and I've seen several over the years. They fingerboard is quite thin, but I'm sure it's not thin enough to bend it ( like a veneer) I don't think.

    I wonder if preeb did one ever. it seems like he did some 60's fender style stuff.
     

  14. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    431
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Muzikp, I received the blueprints today and let me say, they are gorgeous! Thanks again :)
     

  15. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

    Nov 5, 2010
    Sacramento
    You are welcome. I think I got a spot of coffee on one of them tho.
     

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