Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Luthier neck tighten sustain trick

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Carzee, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. Stickyfingers

    Stickyfingers Tele-Meister

    431
    Mar 26, 2004
    near Dayton, Ohio
    ....my Harley too.......
     

  2. EL-CeeDee

    EL-CeeDee TDPRI Member

    10
    May 30, 2010
    Netherlands
    Just did this on 72 roadworn,... improvement was big!
    So, also works on 3 bolt joints
     

  3. Stickyfingers

    Stickyfingers Tele-Meister

    431
    Mar 26, 2004
    near Dayton, Ohio
    I DID try it on the guitaR in my avatar. It did creak and changed the tuning slightly. I had to re-adjust the intonation on two strings, but the guitar played the same and sounded the same, to me. I have a Barden in the bridge and a Mini Duncan in the neck. I could not tell any difference in the accoustic body vibes either. I guess this trick will either improve or do nothing, but I dont see where any harm can come from it unless you loosen up too much....
     

  4. MagicTwanger

    MagicTwanger Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    101
    Jun 20, 2007
    Oregon
    All I want know is if I affix springs, lengthwise, inside my acoustic quitar do I get reverb?
    Seriously, the neck to body contact on the bolt-on neck guitar determines the resulting resonance. The better the contact, ..... End grain to end grain contact IS important. My 66 tele creaked a little and sounds better IMHO. I believe it is because end grain contact was improved.
     

  5. Telemach_1

    Telemach_1 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    59
    Jun 2, 2009
    Somewhere in the woods of
    Yes
     

  6. rushcentrale

    rushcentrale TDPRI Member

    48
    Jun 17, 2008
    Los Angeles, CA
    i just gave three of my bolt on fenders the treatment. they are a CS tele, thinline and strat and all 3 had very tight, well seated necks. after loosening the screws, all three creaked, but they creak with no strings on too. only the strat had a big change in tuning, but strangely enough, the treatment only made a slight change to my tele.

    after, the tele was a little more vibrant, but all three guitars had older strings, so this was no scientific test by any means. one thing i wanted to say though was that this trick was so super easy, i don't know what all the negative press was about. this treatment obviously helped a lot of peoples' guitars, or at the very least, the perception of their guitars. from reading the experiences on the previous 5 pages, this tweak will either make a difference for the better (with varying degrees) or not, but it won't make things worse or hurt the guitar.
     

  7. Steely_Ken

    Steely_Ken Tele-Meister

    388
    May 28, 2010
    Austin Texas
    I did this to my 09 USA Tele, I got a pretty loud snap.
    Re tightened and could tell some difference in the body vibrations.

    An interesting side note, with pedal steels it is commonly done.
    loosen neck screws and re snug not so tight for a tone improvement.
    Very similar results, some improve, some not so much.
    The neck would not shift on a steel and has no string contact.

    A Steel guitar with 1/2 inch string height won't sustain as well as one with 3/4 Ht.
     

  8. DenisS

    DenisS Tele-Meister

    Age:
    61
    436
    Nov 27, 2009
    USA
    What in the world else would a good mechanic do? It's just like putting a front-end on a motorcycle.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010

  9. DenisS

    DenisS Tele-Meister

    Age:
    61
    436
    Nov 27, 2009
    USA
    A little off-topic, but related:

    If you ever needed to shim your neck because the saddles were at the wrong height, or you simply wanted more back-angle, you probably noticed the difference between a solid connection and an air-gapped connection.

    I am currently using shims made up of 4 to 6 layers of .003" writing paper layered in graduated lengths to take care of the air-pocket taper. Big difference. Will make a tapered hardwood shim when my settings are perfected.

    I have a set of those machine screw inserts. Think I will try them now. Thanks for the report on them.
     

  10. leonard22

    leonard22 Tele-Meister

    275
    Aug 12, 2008
    jacksonville florida
    Been doing this for years, i used to do setups for a local shop and the owner taught me all he knew.... i "believe" i can hear a feel the difference in some if not most guitars i have done this to.
    ..... and no matter how well one engineers the neck to neck pocket fit, they undoubtedly do not affix said neck with nearly a hundred pounds of pressure mating the two surfaces. Not that either method (or both together) is the "right" way to do it... It just seems "Silly" to completely disregard something just because it is not your preference.
     

  11. Telemach_1

    Telemach_1 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    59
    Jun 2, 2009
    Somewhere in the woods of
    Took my 69 Strat out of the case yesterday. It had virtually no playing time for the last three or four years. Reason was that it had sounded less twangy and less vibrant compared to my other Strat. It also had a slightly shifted neck alignment w. the low E string being to close to the edge as a result. So a few years ago I compensated for that by bolting the neck in an angle that would provide the E string more headroom. I had done this to my latest Tele too as repoted in a previous post.
    Anyway I decided not to worry about the misalignment in favor of a possibly better sound and decided to do the trick w. this Strat too.
    And yes this one too is back to life again. Fantastico.
     

  12. Triton Thrasher

    Triton Thrasher Tele-Afflicted

    Sep 8, 2010
    Wick, Scotland
    I just did this screw-loosening trick and I think it's worked.

    On a Stagg Tele. A God-damned Stagg d'ya hear me!
     

  13. Retro Relic

    Retro Relic Tele-Meister

    103
    Dec 26, 2008
    Ohio
    Has anyone mentioned clean/scrap/sand, factory stickers/ paint/ stuff down to bare wood on the heel and in the pocket?

    I had an incredible improvement
     

  14. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Age:
    71
    Mar 3, 2003
    NJ via TX
    summa you guyz been drinkin' the koolaid long and hard. :D
     

  15. 4string

    4string Friend of Leo's

    Feb 11, 2010
    Central California
    Leo Fender devised this procedure while at G&L.

    Sorry, but I think I will go with Leo's advice over yours.
     

  16. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Age:
    71
    Mar 3, 2003
    NJ via TX
    have it it, sir ... enjoy the ride, where ever you think it will lead you! :D
     

  17. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    57
    Mar 2, 2010
    Maine
    Hmm, I usually just smack the end of the headstock into the floor (over a joist) and retighten. Watch out for those civilian neck HB installations. Leos idea sounds much safer. Such a brilliant man. One of my favorite quotes: "Still works"
     

  18. weezy109

    weezy109 Tele-Holic

    845
    Aug 28, 2010
    Kentucky
    Most people on this thread are doin the procedure wrong apparently. Most have said they tune it loosen then tighten and tune it again BUT the original procedure was tune loosen tune again and THEN tighten and tune again
     

  19. MatthewK

    MatthewK Tele-Holic

    517
    Jul 29, 2009
    Hobart, Australia
    It doesn't really matter, the point is to loosen the neck screws slightly while the guitar is under string tension. Whether it's exactly in tune or merely close to tune will make negligible difference to the amount of string pull seating the neck in tight. THAT's the important part - having the strings snug the neck in the pocket for you, then tightening the screws to "lock it in".
     

  20. louis cyfer

    louis cyfer Former Member

    132
    Oct 1, 2010
    arcadia
    it is actually pretty simple. you are right. but on a lot of guitars, the holes for the neck screw in the body is too tight, and will not seat the neck properly, forcing a little space between the neck and the body. by going out a 1/4-1/2 turn while the neck is under tension the neck seats against the body, not the pocket, but where the bottom of the neckheel touches the flat part of the neck pocket. tightening the screws then will make for a tighter neck/body joint. this will make no difference on guitars where the holes in the body for the neckscrews are properly drilled. redrilling those holes will yield the same result if the holes are too tight.
     

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.