Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups darrenriley.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Locking in color, adding color over lacquer?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Peckhammer, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. Peckhammer

    Peckhammer Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    496
    Dec 1, 2014
    Seattle
    I stained a piece of Birdseye maple. Cherry red transtint, mixed with alcohol. I later shot 6 coats of rattle can clear nitro, and had to drop fill a small depression. Sanding the drop fill and lacquer resulted in pink dust and some thinning of the color. I don’t think I sanded through the lacquer, but maybe I did. Questions:

    Is there something I should/could have done to lock in that color?

    Is the color bleeding into the lacquer?

    Is there a way to add color over lacquer? Tinted shellac, followed by more clear lacquer?
     

  2. eallen

    eallen Tele-Meister

    Sounds like you just sanded too far and got thru the lacquer, though 6 cans of clear should be a significant layer. The lacquer IS what locks the color in.

    Yes, you can add more color over the layer and then add more clear lacquer over that. I assume you must have wiped on your original trastint?

    If you dont have a spray set up, get a prevail aerosol sprayer, add some transtint to lacquer to add tint, finish with clear. I would be very catious putting anything like schellac over nitro. The lacquer needs to be able to keep breathing or you can have problems.
     

  3. Peckhammer

    Peckhammer Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    496
    Dec 1, 2014
    Seattle
    Yes, the stain was wiped on. Black first, then sanded back, followed by red. I typically add stain to shellac, build up the color, then shoot lacquer. I was trying something different this time. The resulting color looks fantastic, but the pink dust had me concerned. Thanks for the help!
     

  4. Drak

    Drak Tele-Holic

    Age:
    56
    646
    Mar 21, 2003
    DC 'Burbs
    The reason your lac is pinkish is from spraying coats wet and heavy.
    Or there was just a hella lot of dye on the veneer, available to be soaked up.
    The longer the lac stays wet, the longer it can absorb dye into it.
    Even if you shoot a dry first coat to 'lock in' the dye,
    If you then shoot a very wet coat over top of it, it remelts the first coat and dye can seep up into the lac.
    If it was a really wet coat that took some time to dry.
    Lac will absorb some dye anyway, but there are ways to reduce it.
    The dryest coats you can get away with that dry the fastest is the preferred way to reduce dye seepage.
    And once you dye the piece, always wipe the excess dye back off, don't just leave it all sitting there.
    Or a combination of both.
     
    eallen likes this.

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.