"Lick Of The Day"

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Telewanger, Dec 22, 2009.

  1. cosmiccowboy

    cosmiccowboy Tele-Afflicted

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    Great idea, as others have said don't know if I can contribute right away but I think it'll fly!

    BTW~ Thanks to Telewanger for the metronome link.
     
  2. historicus146

    historicus146 Tele-Holic

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    Travato Steel Lick

    Here is a Travato Steel lick from a Fender commercial on youtube..

    The Lick begins at the 1 minute mark.....




    I thought it pretty good and took a stab at tabbing it out....

    I welcome any input or corrections....
     

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  3. Joel Jamieson

    Joel Jamieson Tele-Meister

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    Fun to play! Nice job on the tab. The only thing (and I'm not sure really myself) is the little bendy part you have write as.
    Code:
    --------
    -9-----
    -10----
    -12----
    -------
    -------
    I think is.

    Code:
    -------
    -------
    ---9---
    ---10--
    ---12--
    -------
    kinda reminds me of the little Matt Rae doing Hawaiian vid. Take a shot at that when you get a chance. Cheers!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCYo7Tn8NSs
     
  4. historicus146

    historicus146 Tele-Holic

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    Thanks...

    but I think it is more as I have noted in the revised .pdf...

    0
    0
    10b
    12
    11
    0

    maybe someone else sees it different??
     

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    Last edited: May 8, 2011
  5. historicus146

    historicus146 Tele-Holic

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    revised...
     

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  6. JeradP

    JeradP Former Member

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    That lick is from a country book he authored. It's a pedal steel lick piece.
    "Country Solos For Guitar" is the title
     
  7. Joel Jamieson

    Joel Jamieson Tele-Meister

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    Backwards licks.

    When I get bored I take licks I know and figure them out backwards. I got this off of someone here at TDPRI.

    Code:
    ---------------------------------------
    --10------------------------10-12-----
    -----12-9-10-11---------/11--------9b-
    -----------------12-9------------------
    ----------------------12---------------
    ---------------------------------------
    
    and turned it into...

    Code:
    -----------------------------------------
    --------------------------10---12-----
    ---------/11~-12-9-10/11~----x----10~-
    -----9-12--------------------------------
    --12-------------------------------------
    -----------------------------------------
    
    The first was kinda a swingy jazzy sort of thing. I just slowed it down and gave it a bluesy feel. It is a very familiar sounding lick but I like it and it's moveable.

    Thanks to the poster of the first lick. Can't remember your name but I know it was a youtube/dolphinstreet lesson.

    Cheers!
     
  8. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Telefied Ad Free Member

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    [​IMG]

    One for JS Bach!

    I was noodling a while ago and came up with this palindromic lick -- the second half is the first half played backwards (and down a half step).
     
  9. ednew

    ednew Tele-Holic

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    Robert Renman

    Ed
     
  10. rotren

    rotren Tele-Meister

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    Thanks for the mention! :)

    Here is an Albert King style lick, played on a Squier Tele.

     
  11. tap4154

    tap4154 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Jimmy Reed B Chord Trick

    I posted this over a year ago in another thread, but here it is again. Keith Richards talks about this in his book, how Jimmy Reed did the B chord in an E blues. Really works nice, and saves you from a long finger stretch.

    e------------------------------------------------------------
    B------------------------------------------------------------
    G------------------------------------------------------------
    D-4--4--------4--4--6--4--2--2---------2--2--4--4----------
    A-2--2--5--6--0--0--0--0--0--0--3--4--0--0--0--0--2-----
    E------------------------------------------------------0-------

    You play the A string open as you descend:

     
  12. B0579

    B0579 TDPRI Member

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    quickness

    I had the same problem. Pick a scale - any scale - make it a blues scale with some penatonics or something, the point is, a harder scale with more notes, which blues scales usually are. Start slow on that scale, play it from high E to low E and back up to high E. Do it time after time after time every day.

    My dad used to take Banjo lessons from a guy named Steve Brainerd, kinda a famous guy in bluegrass/banjo circles. Anyway i was learning guitar as he was learning Banjo. He told my dad - and he looked at me and said "this goes for you, too, ya little squirt" (I was 7, this was 35 years ago)...he said "Do two things...have a go-to song or looooong riff you play EVERY time you pick up the instrument...I MEAN EVERY TIME - to warm to. Play that go-to song better than anything else you play. Make it so you play that song so well and so clear and fast without even realizing it. It'll warm you up, give you confidence, and you'll get better faster. Also, learn a scale, any scale with a lot of notes -preferably a blues scale since they have more notes. Play it from high to low and then back up again, over and over. then, move it up or down the fretboard so instead of beginning on , say, a "C" note, begin on an E or A." Sometimes, when you do that you'll hit a sour note - that's normal, it just doesn't belong in that scale due to the way the fretboard is laid out, leave that note out next time...

    You'll get faster and better. And the best byproduct: when your buddies start playing something in "E", you'll know that scale and can play leads and fills!

    Much luck - worked for me!
     
  13. tele salivas

    tele salivas Poster Extraordinaire

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    stuff like this shows you how there is never ever anyone who knows it all, and why the guitar's wierd layout(compared to most instruments) is ripe for inventive exploration. That's a good one Tap!
     
  14. tele salivas

    tele salivas Poster Extraordinaire

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    Here's a good one to warm up with. Merle Haggard's Intro to "Rambling Fever".


    E-|---------------------------------------------------|
    B-|---------------------------------------------------|
    G-|---------------------------------------------------|
    D-|--5-------5---5-7sl/9----8-7-5-----7-5-5------5---|
    A-|----7-5-7---7-------------------7---------7-------|
    E-|---------------------------------------------------|

    E-|----------------------------------------------|
    B-|----------------------------------------------|
    G-|--------------------7-9-7---------------------|
    D-|------5--7sl/9--------------9-7------7--------|
    A-|-5-7----------------------------10------------|
    E-|-----------------------------------------------|

    E-|------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B-|------------------------------------------------------------------|
    G-|--------------7-9-7-----7-9-7-----7-9-7--------------------------|
    D-|--0-2-5--7sl/9--------9--------9---------9sl\7-5-7-5-5-----5-----|
    A-|--------------------------------------------------------7---------|
    E-|------------------------------------------------------------------|

    E-|------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B-|------------------------------------------------------------------|
    G-|-------------------7-9-7------------------------------------------|
    D-|--0--2-5- ---7sl/9----------9sl\7-5-7-------5-7sl/9----------7-5---|
    A-|---------------------------------------5-7-----------10-10--------|
    E-|-------------------------------------------------------------------|
     
  15. jklotz

    jklotz Tele-Afflicted

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    Here's a little country lick I came up with in G.


    E-|---------------------10-8----------------------------------------------|
    B-|----------------------------10(b1)-8----------------------------------|
    G-|---------7-9(b1)----------------------9(b1/2)--7---------7----------|
    D-|---8h9----------------------------------------------8h9------9-8-7-5|
    A-|------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    E-|------------------------------------------------------------------------|
     
  16. Spikerama

    Spikerama Tele-Meister

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    This lick may have been posted already, idk, but anyway...

    Here's a lick I stole from Danny Gatton, so it's only right to pass it on. It will make you sound like you have a bender.

    The example I'm giving is in the key of E. I like to use it when the last chord of the song is E and I have the ending lick.

    fret hand is holding 5th string, 3rd finger, 11th fret
    4th string, 4th finger, 12th fret
    3rd string, 1st finger, 9th fret

    Pick 6th string, 5th string, 4th string, 3rd string and bend 3rd string up a full step and release. Don't mute strings after picking them.

    Good luck. I hope this makes sense and helps. If someone wants to put it in tab or post what it sounds like, please do.
     
  17. hobo mississipp

    hobo mississipp TDPRI Member

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    Some nice chicken eaten pick'n there :D
     
  18. Spikerama

    Spikerama Tele-Meister

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    Haha Thanks! :)
     
  19. ADinNYC

    ADinNYC Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    My very first lick transcription!!

    I've never really transcribed my own stuff before but this lick has been stuck in my head and just I felt the need to get down on paper for some reason. It's in A and would make and good ending to a song I think.

    I've got it recorded too if someone would be kind enough to post it for me. Just let me know where to email it.

    Thanks!

    Andrew
     

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  20. Alex Strekal

    Alex Strekal Tele-Meister

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    Here's a cool line that represents some of my tendencies:

    [​IMG]

    In technical terms, playing this requires position-shifting a few times, lots of pulloffs, hammering on to a new string a few times ("hammerons from nowhere"), and a few little slides up a fret.

    In musical terms, you could think of it as mixolydian with chromatic passing and leading tones, and a few leaps for good measure. It's not uncommon for me to play something like this when soloing in an A blues.

    In fact, just to show some musical context, here's how I could work it into a blues. It would fit perfectly over the I - IV - I (chords named on top):

    [​IMG]
     
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