Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Let's make a neck!

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by guitarbuilder, Aug 2, 2017.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I decided to try something different and went to the edge sander to sand the taper in there. It's a matter of holding it straight and not going beyond the pencil lines. I used to do this with a router and a couple shims on the neck to get an angle. I also bandsawed it off. Then I realized that most of the wood ends up getting removed during the carving process...so maybe it's not as critical as I once had thought. n3.jpg n4.jpg
     

  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I cleaned up the area by the low e tuner hole on my ROSS and sanded the 5" radius for the strat neck end on the edge sander. I took a strat pickguard and a sharp pencil to draw the line there and free handed it on the edge sander.

    n5.jpg

    n6.jpg

    n7.jpg
     
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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I then marked for side dots. I made them about 3/32" up from the glue line of the fretboard and in the center of the necessary frets. I made dents where the lines met with a punch. Then drilled down with a drill bit with a flag attached to keep me from going too deep. n8.jpg n9.jpg n10.jpg n11.jpg
     
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  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    The last thing this morning was to take my belt sander sanding block and just hit the taper a bit. It came out quite nice and was pretty simple to do this way. You can see the taper gap below the piece of pine.


    n12.jpg n13.jpg
     
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  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I glued the dots in with duco cement.

    side dots.jpg face dots.jpg dots and dots.jpg
     
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  6. papaschtroumpf

    papaschtroumpf Tele-Meister

    465
    Nov 24, 2015
    Colorado
    What are you dots and side dots made out of? did you purchase them from a luthier store?
    Is Duco cemnet important? e.g. does it prevent melting them, or on the contrary soften them for better fit? is it so it doesn't interfere with the finish later? can I use wood glue? supoer glue?
     

  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County

    Stewmac and other luthiery suppliers sell premade dots and rods for dots. Wood glue doesn't stick to plastic very well, so a plastic cement or adhesive works better in my opinion. Superglue seeps into wood cells like water, unless you use the thicker stuff, which I don't have here. Superglue will seep into the cells surrounding the dot some and that does impact your finish.


    http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_and_Supplies/Inlay_and_Pearl/Pre-cut_Inlays/Black_Plastic_Dots.html


    http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_an...Trim/Side_Dots/Plastic_Side_Dot_Material.html


    Occasionally I'll punch out my own black dots from pickguard material scraps, but I had these here.

    A couple necks ago I even made a little scraper to make the rod from the same pickguard material scraps.

    You can use brass rod or even rod and epoxy. Some people use the hard craft store baking clay and make dots in the oven with a metal plate drilled with numerous holes the size they want.

    Thirty years ago I made a bunch of contemporary clocks and made the dots with a ring of brass tube and ebony dust/clear epoxy mix.

    When I made my first guitar, they ran out of pearl side dots, so I sanded a bone saddle into a rod. You can use whatever you like.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017

  8. richa

    richa Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Apr 23, 2016
    Washington
    Like that.
     
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  9. papaschtroumpf

    papaschtroumpf Tele-Meister

    465
    Nov 24, 2015
    Colorado
    I remember someone in one of the challenges used some sort of clay to make cherries fret markers. In fact I also want to say he did the binding using some kind of compound rather than use premade binding. It must have been one of those "no purchased parts allowed" challenges.

    I should look it up, I like the idea of personalized fret markers.
     
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  10. mkster

    mkster Tele-Afflicted

    Sep 25, 2010
    Montreal Quebec
    I love the way you do it , it denotes confidence and know-how . Sorry to hear about your blackmail issue , but all and all its great for us, Keep the great work !

    Best regards

    Marc
     
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  11. papaschtroumpf

    papaschtroumpf Tele-Meister

    465
    Nov 24, 2015
    Colorado
    Do you let it dry to act as a "cushion" or do you stick the trussrod in it so it sticks to it?
     

  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    You squirt it in and lay the rod in place. This is an excerpt from the instructions on the stewmac website:

    To install the "spoke nut" truss rod, counterbore a -3/8"-diameter hole 3/4" deep to accept the shank of the adjustment nut. Allow at least 1/16" clearance between both flat sides of the spoke nut and the guitar's neck heel and neck/body cutout. This will prevent the nut from binding on these surfaces as it is adjusted. A 1/4" x 5/8" access rout in the instrument's pickguard/top and the neck/body cutout is required.

    2. Set the truss rod into the slot. Although the rods are cushioned with PVC tubing, we recommend extra cushioning at the nuts to eliminate the possibility of rod rattle. Apply a small amount of silicone bathtub sealer in the slot at the double nuts, then press the rod as deeply into the slot as possible. Use only enough silicone for minimal squeeze-out. A spot or two along the double rods can also be cushioned by a little sealer.
     
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  13. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    For side dots using the plastic rod, a quick dip of just the very end in acetone works well, and is commonly used.
     

  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Yes, and duco cement is 70-80% acetone according to the msds. It also contains some cellulose nitrate for tone and mojo. It's known as one of the finer tone adhesives.
     

  15. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    The facet method for carving a neck. This was the method taught to me by George Morris and Charles Fox at GRD in Stratford Vermont. Apparently this method is used to make masts for ships as well.

    I start by drawing two cross sectional drawings for two locations on the shaft of the neck. I am choosing the first fret and 14th fret as there isn't a transition interfering at either location. There is a transition under the nut and there is a transition beyond fret 14, so the depth of the neck starts to change in those spots.


    I take a machinist scale and measure the width of the fretboard a those places. Fret 1 is 1.75" across and Fret 14 is 2.0625" across.


    I also measure down from the glue line of the fretboard to the bottom of the neck at fret 1 and fret 14. Those depths are .625 and .75 respectively.


    In my drawing program, I draw a rectangle for the fret 1 cross section by representing the fretboard height of .25 with a radius of 12" on top.


    Directly below it I draw a rectangle representing the neck wood glued to it.

    I repeat that for the fret 14 cross section. The fretboard stays the same thickness, but gets wider due to the taper of the fretboard.

    The two drawings look like this:


    cross sections.png
     

  16. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Now I draw in a curve to represent the shape of the neck I want there.


    cross sections2.png
     

  17. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Next I draw a line in at a 45 degree angle that is tangent ( touching) the curved line. I'm showing that as a white line... note it is at 45 degrees :).

    cross sections3.png
     

  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Then I measure down from the glue line to the 45 degree angle line, and measure over from the center of the neck to the 45 degree line at the bottom surface. I make note of those measurements.


    cross sections4.png
     

  19. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County

  20. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Next I am going to take those measurements and transfer them to lines on the actual neck wood.
     

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