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Let's make a neck!

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by guitarbuilder, Aug 2, 2017.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    The neck block needed a recess for the truss rod nut. I drew some lines on there with a square about 1/4" apart and 1/2" long. I cut them out on the bandsaw and nibbled the rest out in between.


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  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Next I marked out some centers for the bolt holes. I'm using hanger bolts from Woodcraft. They are a combination of 1/4-20 machine threads and a lag screw. I've used these with great success. I put the neck block over the tenon nice and tight and drilled in with a 3/16 twist drill. The tape flag tells me when to stop.

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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    The tenon got trimmed and rounded to fit the neck block before I drilled. I used a little back saw and my sanding block to do it. It still needs a bit of chiseling to clean it up, which I'll do later. I used a lag bolt and box wrench to make threads in the pilot holes.



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  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Then I stuck a couple nuts on the hanger bolt and tighten them in.

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  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Lastly I drilled out the 3/16" pilot holes with 9/32" holes on the drill press. This allows a hair of adjustment for the washers and nuts. DSC05777.JPG


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  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    And how it looks on the neck at this point.


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    nosmo and crazydave911 like this.

  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I drew up some measurements for the cross sections of the neck at fret 10 and the nut.

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    crazydave911 likes this.

  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Then I trimmed the neck flush to the fretboard with my little plane so I could put the lines down on a level surface.


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    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018

  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Then I drew the lines on the neck.


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  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Using a half round rasp I started to remove mahogany at the 45 degree angle transitions.



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  11. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Then using the Farrier's rasp, I worked on the flat 45 degree angle between them.


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  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Then using the file portion of the rasp, I cleaned up the surfaces.

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    sergiomajluf likes this.

  13. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I did the secondary facets and finished the rough carve today. First a few guide lines were drawn equidistant from the center line.





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  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    And then followed up with a scraper, file, and sanding block. This will still need some further work and attention at the transitions, but the bulk of it is done.

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  15. Bugeater281

    Bugeater281 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    27
    290
    Nov 30, 2016
    Omaha
    You guys have wayyyy more patience than I do. I use this to rough it out then use a rasp. IMG_7612.JPG
     
    guitarbuilder likes this.

  16. Freekmagnet

    Freekmagnet Tele-Meister

    240
    Dec 7, 2015
    Ventura County, CA
    @guitarbuilder - I haven’t quite caught this on your neck builds, but do you generally cut the fretboard taper and use the edge of the fretboard to route the neck taper?

    On the mahogany neck with the angled headstock, did you cut the taper of the fretboard and the taper separately and then them together?

    Just curious - I’m planning my attack on my own neck build.

    Thanks for sharing this. Your necks look great and the information is really helpful.
     

  17. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County

    I have done this a bunch of ways. On a fender style neck with a two piece fretboard I would taper the fretboard , usually after slotting, and that becomes a guide for the flush trim bit.

    On this mahogany acoustic neck I tapered the fretboard on the jointer after bandsawing it out. Then after gluing, I just bandsawed the excess mahogany outside the line and used my little Stanley plane to clean it up right before the carve. I did that to get my lines drawn on it. If I wasn't drawing lines, I would have skipped that step. The only straight edge that remains after carving is the fretboard edge, as everything that was straight, is cut away for the most part.

    I can't really remember what I did on my early 80's necks, but the stewmac bit or flush trim bits were not available yet and I didn't use those router base inserts to offset things either, so I must have just cut and sanded the neck with a sanding block. and made sure the heel wasn't under 2-3/16".

    I got more anal with things as time went on and had a jig for every step. After a while I realized that half of the stuff I jigged up wasn't really needed if I was more confident and developed my skills more.

    If there was a tiny bit of variation, it didn't matter because it was still less slop in the joint than Fender in the 80's...:).
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2018
    Freekmagnet likes this.

  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I set up my radius beam with 220 grit stick on abrasive and sanded the stewmac fretboard. I've used dozens of these over the years and they offer good bang for the buck.



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  19. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Then I cut off the excess fingerboard that I didn't need.

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  20. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Then I spent a bit of time getting things nice and true on the beam. I use a zona saw to clean out the dust prior to the triangular filing of the fret slot. Zona saws are thinner than the .023 kerf so they can just be dragged backward and don't bind.

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