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Kit build gone wild

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Semi solid waste, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. Semi solid waste

    Semi solid waste NEW MEMBER!

    2
    Jan 3, 2018
    Kamloops canada
    Hi ive just bought my first tele kit online and after checking the hardwear i ordered all new premium parts ( couldnt live with myself if i built a substandard tele) and found out the hard way my vintage noiseless pups are to big for My cavities (ran out and bought a dremmel) and the modern bridge has to be moved up the body to a new position and i have to drill holes thru the body for the strings. All this terrifies me this easy first build has turned into a doozie ive not worked on it for 2 weeks mostly out of fear of wrecking the body but its time to man up as all parts have arrived and i am bustin to play the thing this site has been a godsend (as well as the reaaon i got my self into this mess) but soooo much info its hard to wade thru i have to ask for help so here go's
    1. How do i get this bridge in the right spot with just i have all standard measuring tools and have to get this perfect.
    2. any tips on routing with my dremmel all is lost if i blow this part.
    3. I think iam going to wire in trebble bleed ( just cos) where can i find diagram for dummies to do this.
    Thanks in advance
    Dave
     

  2. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    42
    Mar 17, 2003
    albany, ny [not chicago]
    Hi, Dave, and welcome to the TDPRI! Some of these things are easy, some less so...

    1. Tele bridges have a ton of adjustment room in the saddles. It's more important that it line up with your string-through holes and the pickup placement. Mount the pickup in the saddle, and put the assembly in the guitar and see how it lines up.

    The saddles are going to need to be just a bit over 25.5" from the front edge of the nut. (Add about 1/16" at the High E, about 1/4" at the low E)

    2. A Dremel isn't really a great tool for the job. You can get it done, but it's extremely difficult to do it neatly and it's underpowered for the job. It's like a 5 minute job with a sharp chisel, and you'll have more control. If you don't have one, see if a friend or neighbor might be able to help you out. Woodworkers tend to be very generous and helpful people.

    3. The treble bleed mod is easy. I found this page quickly after a google search: https://www.premierguitar.com/artic...ur-strat-tele-les-paul-and-super-strat?page=4
     
    Tonetele and BorderRadio like this.

  3. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    58
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA
    So its a little unclear

    Your kit has pre-routed pickup cavities, but your pickups are too big? Meaning too tall/deep or too wide?

    Your kit body already has holes drilled for a vintage bridge, but you have a modern bridge, so you need to drill new holes for the strings?

    Is that right?

    Why not just get a vintage-style bridge? It seems trivial, but drilling hole for the strings is surprisingly hard to get right. Seriously, unless you have a good drill press, and start the hole with a punch so the bit doesn't wander, the holes on the back will end up unevenly spaced. If I were you, I'd get a vintage-style bridge and use the hole which I assume are already there.

    I also agree that a dremel is a bad tool for the job. It's underpowered and it will have a tendency to skitter out of the pocket and lay waste to the top of the body. A sharp chisel is a better bet

    And I also agree that you don't have to be totally precise-e. measure from the front of the nut to 25.5 and set the bridge so the high E string saddle is at 25.5. You don't have to be all that precise--that's why leo made adjustment screws
     
    VB Tele likes this.

  4. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Apr 2, 2014
    Phoenix, AZ
    +2 on all the good advice above ^^^

    I also find the Dremel to be under powered--but that could be a good thing if you have zero router experience and the amount of material you need to remove is small. On the other hand if it is small, the chisel makes way more sense--pics are needed in this thread. I've routed shallow wiring channels this way before I got a trim router--minor tear out but it got the job done. I used the Dremel with the aluminum routing base (This one from Antique Electronic Supply), extremely helpful.

    AES also carries a V-Treb gadget, basically a treble bleed circuit with a trim pot. Instead of clipping in a bunch of values of resistors and caps to find what works with both my ears and my pickups, I just adjust the pot until it sounds right. Works like it should. Comes with directions.

    https://www.tubesandmore.com/products/circuit-pmt-variable-treble-bleed

    r-vpmt-vt.png
     
    bender66 likes this.

  5. src9000

    src9000 Poster Extraordinaire

    I like that variable trim pot.

    I have used the dremel to do this with sanding sleeve, not with router bit.

    Edit: they are called sanding bands.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
    bender66 likes this.

  6. Semi solid waste

    Semi solid waste NEW MEMBER!

    2
    Jan 3, 2018
    Kamloops canada
    Awesome help guys.i knew this was the place to go. im on my way now will be at it all w end will post pictures as i go. Now down to the strat cave.
     

  7. Telecentric

    Telecentric Tele-Meister

    Age:
    58
    106
    Nov 23, 2016
    Boulder Creek, Ca
    If it were me, I would ditch the modern bridge and use a Wilkinson dual load, and top load it. As others have said, the chances of screwing up the holes is roughly 99%. You could still use it as string through if you insist on drilling the body.

    For positioning, you have 2 important dimensions. The saddles need to be 25.5" from the nut (12.25" from the 12th fret. I run a string from the low E tuner, over the saddle and through the top loader hole, over to the high E hole and saddle and up to the high E tuner. When the saddles are at the right position, make sure the string is tight and even on the sides of the fretboard.

    If you do use a dremel, spring for a router attachment. The plunge router is much more stable but the little one will work

    shopping.jpg shopping-1.jpg
    Good Luck!
     
    Steve Holt likes this.

  8. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

    Jun 22, 2010
    Osaka, Japan
    You're in for it now, mate! :D
     
    bender66 likes this.

  9. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    Good luck with everything, but why the heck did you buy a kit in the first place? There are plenty of sources for cheap bodies and necks, and you buy the other parts as you want.

    I think you're in a rabbit's hole here, and might not be worth the expense and aggravation of pursuing.

    Either install every part of the kit as supplied, or move on to a different plan.
     

  10. LowThudd

    LowThudd Friend of Leo's

    Feb 11, 2014
    Sherman Oaks, Ca
    FWIW several manufacturers including Gotoh make six saddle conversion bridges designed to fit vintage string spacing.
     

  11. tombob

    tombob Tele-Meister

    Age:
    45
    491
    Jun 25, 2010
    Sonora, TX
    There's several good 6-saddle vintage bridges around. Wilkinson makes a compensated 3-saddle with heavy brass saddles that I really like myself. That is really a lot better way to go than redrilling the string-thru holes. The Wilkinson also comes in a cut down short version like the G.E. Smith Tele has.
    With good hardware the vintage style parts work and play as well as any modern Tele does, in fact I prefer the vintage string spacing since I'm a fingerpicker. I have also used a couple of sets of locking post vintage style tuners on Strats that work great. Using what the body and neck is drilled for would work out a lot easier and better in my opinion than filling/redrilling everything.

    image.jpeg image.jpeg
     

  12. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

    Jun 22, 2010
    Osaka, Japan
    Yeah, re-drilling string holes: if you really can do that properly, you don't need no kit. In my book, that's a scratch-build level skill...
     
    Ira7 likes this.

  13. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    I will never try to drill string holes again.
     

  14. user34603

    user34603 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    68
    396
    Dec 5, 2016
    Richmond VA
    This is ordinary, but the smart way to do part of it (the cutting part)... is take the guitar to a professional repair/setup/builder guy. If none is available, then you are on your own. It's a one-time job, so don't risk ruining a kit on something you never did before nor have tools for that you are already handy with. My pals locally are pros at this stuff and hang out with Lindy and/or build his custom guitars in the vids he makes. You need a guy like that for this one project.
     

  15. LowThudd

    LowThudd Friend of Leo's

    Feb 11, 2014
    Sherman Oaks, Ca
    Seems to me, if a person wants a professional to build their guitar, they wouldn't buy a kit.
     
    Steve Holt likes this.

  16. bender66

    bender66 Friend of Leo's

    Jan 18, 2010
    on my bike
    Bad experience?

    What was your method if so? It could be of help to the op.

    Having a local guy look over your shoulder is a great idea if available. Next best is YouTube/tdpri.
     

  17. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    42
    Mar 17, 2003
    albany, ny [not chicago]
    String through holes are very difficult to get right, even with a template. That tiny bit can easily bend and wander as it goes through different layers of grain, and because they're so close, even a tiny error looks sloppy.
     
    Ira7 likes this.

  18. Hobs

    Hobs TDPRI Member

    40
    Sep 16, 2011
    Nashville, TN
    Check your math before you drill holes. It's 12.75" from the 12th fret
     

  19. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    This.

    This exactly.
     

  20. Vespa_One

    Vespa_One Tele-Holic

    511
    Feb 14, 2017
    US
    I would use a top loading bridge, easy solution.
     
    Jupiter and bender66 like this.

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