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Jig Madness - Neck Carve - Fretboard Radius - Fret Slotting

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by PingGuo, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    652
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    I've decided I need to build some jigs to advance my guitar agenda.

    This thread will document the process of making the jigs.

    Step 1:

    Buy a $100 ryobi table saw...

    the spend nearly $200 on a fret slotting blade and scale template at stew-mac.

    Step 2: Use this amazing layout calculator to determine my cut layouts:

    http://workshop-buddy.com/

    http://workshop-buddy.com/cut-optimization-calculator.html

    Step 3: wiggle around its output and determine which cuts I need Lowe's to do so I can get the plywood into my subaru.

    Step 4: realize the ryobi saw has the worst miter rails in the world. omg wtf.

    Mill down 1/4" MDF for the rails that will make the cross cut sled for the fret slotting jig.

    That's it for now... to be continued.

    IMG_3260.jpg IMG_3261.jpg IMG_3262.jpg IMG_3249.jpg IMG_3251.jpg IMG_3252.jpg IMG_3253.jpg IMG_3254.jpg IMG_3255.jpg IMG_3257.jpg
     
  2. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    652
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    First up we took care of some of the cuts and built the fret slotting cross cut sled. It's designed to work with the stewmac saw blade and templates.

    It'll be a few days before I get to test it out. We need to finish cutting the rest of the ply before before we can put the fret slotting blade on the saw.

    It's worth mentioning that the miter slots on the ryobi saw are terrible.

    Let me know if you have thoughts or questions

    IMG_3273.jpg IMG_3278.jpg IMG_3282.jpg IMG_3283.jpg IMG_3284.jpg IMG_3286.jpg IMG_3287.jpg IMG_3288.jpg IMG_3289.jpg IMG_3290.jpg
     
  3. Luthi3rz

    Luthi3rz TDPRI Member

    Age:
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    75
    Jul 22, 2018
    AZ
    No questions. I actually need to make some of this stuff. Keep them coming.
     
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  4. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    652
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    in the shop working on them right now!

    I'm really really looking forward to them being done and dialed in.

     
  5. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

    Age:
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    Apr 3, 2018
    victor,ny
    O dear. Never buy a hundred dollar table saw. If this is a hobby you are into, do yourself a favor and save up.
     
  6. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

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    victor,ny
    That is a horrible way
    Hopefully you moved your body position to finish that cut
     
  7. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

    Age:
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    Apr 3, 2018
    victor,ny
    And what is a neck carve jig, and why would one need one?
     
  8. On a more positive note... The more you work the more you learn!

    I have used a Scheltema style neck carving jig to build my necks for some years and love it.

    Keep it up and more importantly, have fun doing it!

    Eric
     
    PingGuo likes this.
  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County

    A neck jig (developed by Bill Scheltema) is a way to get repeatable results on Fender style neck construction. It only cuts the shaft part, you still need to manipulate the rest of the neck, which is the hard part, so I don't see it as a real timesaver myself. I guess if you are mass producing the same thing over and over, I can sort of see it. Most people find that the carving is the fun and satisfying part. As always YMMV :).

    https://www.google.com/search?q=sch...meHcAhUB9IMKHactCjAQ_AUICygC&biw=1265&bih=620
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
  10. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

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    victor,ny
    I was kinda poking fun. I'm a drawknife,spokeshave,rasp kinda guy but I guess if you're making a ton of necks itd be useful for roughing them out. Other than that it seems a huge waste of time
     
  11. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    652
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    So far the saw is working great. We've made a bunch of square cuts with it.

    The thing came with the blade square at zero out of the box. And the rip fence is surprisingly functional too.

    Anyhow, the saw will be used mostly for cutting fret slots. Compared to some of the unguarded radial arm saw setups I see guys using for this I think the little ryobi saw will do just fine.

    It's a turd. But that doesn't mean it's not functional. You just be honest about what it can and can't do.
     
    Rclax, eallen and 6stringcowboy like this.
  12. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

    Age:
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    Apr 3, 2018
    victor,ny
    Very realistic. I've actually thought about a dedicated table saw for that but didn't realize you could get one for so darn cheap. I may just have to seek one out. Thanks!
     
  13. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

    Apr 18, 2014
    Near Detroit, MI
    .

    I tried the BS jig and kept getting poor results. I used the manual layout 'rasp' method and that works a lot better plus easy to do. I switched from a rasp to a 10-grit carbide wheel on the angle grinder and that makes fast work of a neck carve activity.

    For fret slots I bought a harbor freight flush-cut pull-saw ($10) and hammered the kerf to fret slot widith then double-sided taped a piece of wood to the side at the correct depth that also stiffens the blade. Mark the lines and cut. Easy. I did buy a used mini-table saw (more of like a circular saw mounted in a tin box under a foot square) that I intend to convert to fret slotting and see if that works.

    .
     
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  14. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    652
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    The biggest issue with the ryobi for this is that the miter rails suck. In the earlier pictures you can see me rabbeting mdf. That's because the miter slots have stupid notches in them.

    That said, the jig seems fine now that it's made.

    It's also worth mentioning that the table, when measured across its entire width is cupped nearly 10 thou.

    But none of this prevents making basic cuts in dimensioned products like ply.

    If the goal is use the saw for making furniture... well, it simply doesn't meet that bar.
     
  15. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    652
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    I've learned that it's impossible to post anything with tools on the internet without offending someone. It's one of the constants of the universe that confirms you're still alive.

    It's safe to assume we only run the saw with our bodies entirely to the left of the blade ;)
     
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  16. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

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    Not offensive, it's just that being a cabinet maker for the last 25 years I've seen some stuff when it comes to table saw chicanery. Hey if safety ain't your bag, have at it.
     
  17. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    652
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    It doesn't look like much in the pictures...

    But all of the main cuts are done now.

    Now it's time to start on assembly and cutting out the funny shape for the neck holder in the neck carving jig...

    @jimgchord what do you think of my festool rail saw?

    IMG_3298.jpg IMG_3297.jpg IMG_3296.jpg IMG_3295.jpg IMG_3293.jpg IMG_3299.jpg
     
  18. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    652
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    If you have time to post some pictures demonstrating how you would have started that cut on a job site saw I'd greatly appreciate it. A video would be even better.

    I'm definitely not 25 years cabinet maker experienced. My partner (running the cut) has spent a few years making theater sets and currently builds bespoke museum exhibits for a living. But there's always room to learn!

    Our last saw was from the 50s and getting it to work with a riving knife was impossible. It was beautiful. But too scary for me. So we got rid of it.


     
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  19. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

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    victor,ny
     
  20. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

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    victor,ny
    I wasn't referring to starting the cut, I spoke of the finishing of the cut. But all you need is the front edge of the material on the edge of the table then get behind it .I cut 8 foot sheets everyday like that by myself. Believe it or not I've seen guys on more than one occasion not move to the other side in time and either tourque the workpiece or not push the piece all the way through, either way the results can be spectacular. Probably not a huge deal on a wimpy little saw but I wouldn't bet on it. Do it on a 3hp saw and you are gonna either be eating wood or if anyone is within 50 feet of the back of that saw...good luck to them. Wasn't trying to ruffle your feathers, point was that anytime you start making big moves around the saw you are increasing the chance of kickback or you reaching over that blade.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
    PingGuo likes this.
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