Is this accurate enough? Fretboard layout

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Tdel10, Oct 30, 2016.

  1. Tdel10

    Tdel10 Tele-Meister

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    This is the highest amount of accuracy I can achieve with what I have . I really took my time and am confident in saying that it's accurate to the "quarter millimeter ". . . Or so lol.

    How much does this really matter? Is there truly an audible difference in . 2mm? 20161030_162612.jpg
     
  2. Tdel10

    Tdel10 Tele-Meister

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    And another question:

    What do I do first . . . Radius sand the board or cut the fret slots? If I cut the frets now, how do I know how deep to go to account for the radius sanding? If I sand first, then it'll erase my lines and I don't know if I could lay it back out on a curved surface?

    What do you do first ?
     
  3. darkforce

    darkforce Tele-Meister

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    Take my answer with a grain of salt, since I am still working on my first neck!

    If you rechecked all your marks that should be good enough. One millimeter of misplacement roughly corresponds to 6 cents detuning if I remember correctly, so its in the barely audible region. Fret placement is a compromise anyway. Look at how far the frets are out in a true temprament fretting system!

    I would cut the fretslots first. Cut them to your desired depth, radius and then recut to the final depth after radiusing.

    Best regards,
    Johannes
     
  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I radius first, then cut the slots.
     
  5. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

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    I've only ever made lap steel boards with painted markers. I did a couple as you have done, and if you get them a tiny bit out on the high frets, it looks ugly as. Then I board a slotted board from Stewmac. I had intended to use it for another lap steel, but never did. I have used it as a marker for other lap steel boards though. This shows how:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Tdel10

    Tdel10 Tele-Meister

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    How do you use a square and straightedge across a curved surface? Or am I missing something here ?
     
  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    You make a simple miter box.


    [​IMG]


    That's a Harbor Fret saw there, but if you have a regular fretsaw with a hard back, that keeps it from going beyond your cross pieces. I used some thin washers underneath the aluminum angle to raise it up so I could just saw till the back was even with the aluminum. It worked well. The long pieces left to right are held down with carpet tape. I personally would not try this free hand because of my desire for being as accurate as I can get it.



    http://westfarthingwoodworks.com/tag/fret-slot-miter-box/

    https://www.google.com/search?q=miter+box+fretsaw&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiSoqa3zoPQAhXC3YMKHTFPDFkQ_AUICSgC&biw=1600&bih=713&dpr=1.2#imgrc=f-I8Lpskr2t2gM:
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2016
  8. Meteorman

    Meteorman Tele-Holic

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    I cut slots on the square fretboard, then radius, then recut. I use a miter jig similar to guitarbuilder's for the initial cut. For the final re-cut, i have a depth-stop mounted on my fretsaw, and work carefully freehand.
     
  9. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    That harbor freight pullsaw, for $9, makes a perfect fret slot if you hammer the kerf out of it. You can stiffen the back by putting double-stick tape and a small square of wood along one side near the spine.
    The saw box guide keeps it all straight.
    Practice on a scrap piece all the way down from nut to 21st fret then put it against one of your factory guitars to see how well you did, if the frets all fit in your cut lines you did well.
     
  10. Tdel10

    Tdel10 Tele-Meister

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    I got the saw/box combo at Walmart for $9. I sanded the blade with a vibrating palm sander and 100grit for about 20 minutes. Knocked it down to size .

    Middle cut is stock. Top cut is after first sanding attempt . Bottom cut is final. What a difference . 20161029_231615.jpg 20161029_225055.jpg 20161029_231857.jpg


    Now the problem is the miter box is way too sloppy . I think I'm just going to make a purpose built one out of wood and use this saw to do it so the kerf is exact.
     
  11. 26and385

    26and385 TDPRI Member

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    Pretty easy to build a miter box yourself, if you have the skills to build a guitar. Mine is on post 32 of my build thread:

    http://www.m.tdpri.com/threads/first-build-52-black-guard-ish-tele.549818/page-2

    I printed out a template to scale from one of the online fretboard calculators, and screwed it to the front of the miter box. Then I just slide the guide box to line up with each line on the template, and cut. I used the HF saw, it's the perfect size and I did nothing to modify the kerf width. I cut after sanding in the radius. My guide to knowing how deep to cut is simple. Once the teeth of the saw disappear in the slot, I've cut deep enough. At least for the fret wire I have...
     
  12. Tdel10

    Tdel10 Tele-Meister

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    Started cutting the frets out. This'll have to do . It's straight , and I'm sure there are easier ways like suggested above , but this is what I'm going with .

    I don't know if sanding the blade like that dulled it , or if it was just junk to begin with , but man is this thing hard to pull. Seriously , it's a workout .

    Cutting into a flat(planed) board. Going deeper than I think I need to, just guessing really and making them uniform. About 7 pulls per slot, after I scored the line with an awl.

    Will radius sand and touch up the depth if need be at a later date . 20161030_214704.jpg 20161030_221955.jpg

    My thinking is this:

    If I have to buy ANYTHING else to make this fretboard, I'm just going to go buy a pre-made fretboard and spend the same amount of cash . They are pretty cheap , I just wanted to try it and now I'm in too deep with time to abandon ship
     
    darkforce likes this.
  13. OneEyedDog

    OneEyedDog Tele-Meister

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    This may, or may not, be of some use ;) as I've only just finished my first neck and haven't finished the body yet, so I have no idea how mine will tune up.......
    I made a one piece maple neck and decided to cut the fret slots before I even routed the neck out of the wood. That way I knew everything was square at that stage. After cutting out the neck I radiused the top, then re-cut the fret slots following the contour to get an even depth. Obviously not the only (or even 'correct') way but it worked for me.

    The only thing I would mention is that I measured, checked and re-measured before nearly cutting my slots and still managed to be out by a country mile. I ended up investing a tenner on an acrylic template. You can see my original markings here if you look closely. Oops, almost!

    P1040266.JPG
     
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