Is this a vintage tele?

Discussion in 'Vintage Tele Discussion Forum (pre-1974)' started by edodo, Apr 12, 2015.

  1. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Well, OP.. it is a Fullerton...:D
     
  2. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Great guitar. Problem is, no matter what the definition, some folks want the definition of a vintage Tele to be widened, others narrowed. Coincidentally, it seems to settle based on the year of the Tele they happen to own.
     
  3. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Platinum Supporter

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    :lol::D;)
     
  4. Major Gruber

    Major Gruber Tele-Afflicted

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    Sure. It's just in the sense that when there's no notch, it's a post 72 guitar for sure, but if there's a notch it doesn't mean it's not… :confused:
     
  5. savofenno

    savofenno Tele-Afflicted

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    I say let there be 2 kinds of vintage: up to 1965 Leo Fender guitars and up to 1982 CBS era.;)
     
  6. Major Gruber

    Major Gruber Tele-Afflicted

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    We could just say too that vintage is all this period that stands before they started to craft guitars like before.

    For the rest, years price rate will take care of the details.
     
  7. gypsy jim

    gypsy jim Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I don't have a dog in the fight but doesn't "vintage" and "antique" represent a certain age that changes with time? It strikes me so oddly when a see a 1995 car with historic tags. Makes me feel really old. :(
     
  8. kgguitarplayer

    kgguitarplayer Tele-Meister

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    Seems to me that teles from the '70s and 80's are going to eventually become vintage. I'm probably younger than most on this forum (25) and I have a '74 tele that is, according to this site, one year out of the "vintage range". When I'm 65 its hard to believe that teles from the '70s and 80's that people nowadays are in such a rush to dismiss as anything of value will eventually be very desirable (the good examples of course). This is just based on the fact that they'll be "old" and may possibly have a certain vibe to them that many brand new guitars don't yet have. I got lucky with my '74, its a great guitar. I'll be holding onto it and looking forward to that time when it truly does become "vintage".

    I think vintage is a term that needs to have a certain criteria, that if met, designates your guitar as being vintage. If you search the internet there are tons of different opinions and this forum is just another of those. There seems to be no clear-cut answer.

    I did see one explanation that made me think a bit. It mentioned a vintage fender as being a guitar that captures "a snapshot of fender's history". That would I guess imply there being different levels of vintage fender guitars. One level might be, for example, Pre-CBS Vintage. Another might be a tele from the year after Leo sold the company to CBS since this does provide a snapshot of the company's history and highlights changes made to the instrument. This could be an example of a CBS-era Vintage. At some point once you start to see only minor cosmetic changes to the guitar and you reach that point when a guitar is of an age that you just can't call it vintage, say before 25 years or so, you would have to stop this process I guess. I don't know, but i'm enjoying this conversation. Learning a lot about the differences in old fenders from different time periods. Y'all keep it up!

    I wonder what George Gruhn's definition of a vintage Fender is.
     
  9. stretford

    stretford TDPRI Member

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    I don't think this is the case. It's not just age that makes something desirable, it is the era and materials and history. The unsatisfying guitars of the 1970's and 1980's are what inspired many people to look to the past for something better.
     
  10. kgguitarplayer

    kgguitarplayer Tele-Meister

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    Yes. However there are some guitars from the '70s and '80s that are just as good as the guitars from the '50s and '60s. Some aren't, but some are. Just like there are some guitars being built today that can rival old guitars from the '50s. Notice i said "some". Alot of people may not want to admit that though.

    Let's say it's the year 2050. Someone finds a guitar from the '70s or 80's that is in great shape and is an absolutely killer guitar. You can't tell me that someone won't be willing to pay big bucks from a great playing guitar from an era of fender's history that will, by that time, be 70 or 80 years in the past. Now this guitar may not be as desirable as one would be from the 50's or 60's, but it will be desirable.

    My opinion is that they will eventually be classified as vintage. You also can't really classify all guitars from the '70s and 80's as unsatisfying. You must not have played many if thats the case. Every week I go to band practice and there is a 1970, 1974 and 1978 tele present, played by three different members of the band including myself. They all three are great guitars.
     
  11. MrTwang

    MrTwang Friend of Leo's

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    Don't make the mistake of assuming all guitars from the 50's and 60's were great either.

    There are guitars from the 70's, 80's and up to the present day that are way better than some of the guitars from the 50's and 60's.
     
  12. kgguitarplayer

    kgguitarplayer Tele-Meister

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    I agree with you. It would only make sense that fender would have the ability to make guitars just as good today, if not better, than 60 years ago.
     
  13. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Terms denoting extended age include antique, vintage and old.
    There is a connotation to the term "vintage" that connects it to a particularly good or desirable production era of a thing that is old but not antique.

    Antique is more specific to age, where vintage implies from a good era.

    While later '70s and '80s Fenders will probably some day become widely referred to as vintage, it would be kind of wrong to equate them to, or lump them in with the '50s and '60s vintages, just because they got older.

    If you look at something like old Stanley planes, there are some stellar periods of production, followed a consistent decline in quality, and I don't think anyone really considers an early '70s Stanley to be a "vintage Stanley" today, even though it has the age cred of a vintage Fender.

    So calling old things "vintage" is not determined by age, it's determined by era.

    And popular opinion.
     
  14. edodo

    edodo TDPRI Member

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    I say those CBS tele are exquisite. You can bash them when you play them and dont like them. As for mine I just love it!
    It's a little heavy, but it sounds so big and warm and sustain for days. The pups are just so much more finer sounding than the 2010 tele standard its not funny! Love the fat neck, love the burst, love it to bits that undesirable guitar from the end of the CBS era.
    I say find one that plays great from that period, prices are low :rolleyes:

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
  15. Dan R

    Dan R Friend of Leo's

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    Edodo, that's a sweet guitar. It's a great looking sunburst too. The 'dome' control knobs look cool. Forget about the 'vintage' label, and enjoy it. Mine's a 1975 and I love it.
     
  16. SamClemons

    SamClemons Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would say anything prior to 2015 is vintage, just look at EBAY and Craigslist.....
     
  17. Tele wacker

    Tele wacker Tele-Holic

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    I traded for a Tele in the early 80's and it had the same bridge yours has. I'd say don't worry about vintage. Just play it and enjoy it.
     
  18. slack

    slack Friend of Leo's

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    1968 wasn't the last year for lacquer finishes (though the transition to poly began then) and 1974 wasn't the end of the notch (1972 was -- nothing really happened to the Tele in 1974; they're mostly the same as 1973 models). I regard vintage Teles as 1982 and older (as does Fender). 1982 marked the end of the run of the basic Tele, through it's various revisions, and the beginning of a signifcantly different version, and reissues of the earliest version.
     
  19. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Platinum Supporter

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    I've been hoping you'd chime in on these vintage threads. I appreciate your knowledge of vintage Teles very much - as I'm sure you know.

    I'll have to disagree about the time of the disappearance of the notch though. My picture of the 1973 Telecaster Custom shows a pronounced notch, and Major Gruber has pictorial evidence of both 1972 and '73 Teles with a notch.
     
  20. ItchyFingers

    ItchyFingers Tele-Afflicted

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    A historic vehicle in Ontario Canada must be essentially unchanged from original and be at least 30 years old. It is defined by law (Highway Traffic Act
    R.R.O. 1990, REGULATION 628
    VEHICLE PERMITs) It is a sliding scale and yes, it makes me feel old. 1985 is historical? yikes. I had 11 cars by then.

    One thing about that guitar is that it is worth keeping for another century or two regardless of what you call it.
    When did they actually change to the six saddle bridge?
    Nice guitar that I would be more than proud to own that's for sure.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2015
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