Instrument with players who are really serious

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by D_W_PGH, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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    What instrument has players with the least humor?

    Some might say banjo, but I played banjo for a while and as much as banjo players are made fun of, the group seems to take it pretty well.

    However, I learned by observing Greg rich that mandolin players do not like at all to be told things like "hey, you look really funny with that tiny little instrument and really serious face".

    I brought this up on here before and a couple of posters got really unhappy about it!

    What musicians can you think of who are really serious about themselves and others maybe not so much?
     
  2. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I’ve known a number of pedal steel guitarists who are controlling, joyless, and deadly serious about what they believe country music should be.
    I LOVE undermining, circumventing, and otherwise foiling them.
    Barstidges!
     
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  3. Nickadermis

    Nickadermis Friend of Leo's

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    Rebel !
     
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  4. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    bagpipers, and maybe harpists
     
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  5. Togman

    Togman Tele-Afflicted

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    I meet many different musicians as a free-lance player for stage musicals. The only one that I have ever experienced without a shred of humour was a young guy (early 20's) called Jacob - a Cello player.

    We were playing for 'Fiddler on the Roof' and one of the stage sets involved a ladder. There were many jokes amongst the band about it being Jacobs ladder - but not a smile crossed his lips.
     
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  6. teleteej

    teleteej TDPRI Member

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    Classically trained violinists.
     
  7. denny

    denny Tele-Holic Gold Supporter

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    A friend of mine who played (french) horn professionally for several years in orchestras in the US and Europe said that bassoon players have the most sour dispositions of any musicians he had met. My reaction was if I had to play an instrument that sounds like a duck, I wouldn't be too happy about it either.
     
  8. markjames

    markjames TDPRI Member

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    I used to know a Pink Oboe player a few years ago..... He was a miserable So & So.!
     
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  9. basher

    basher Tele-Afflicted

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    Yep. The Scottish Highland pipers I've known are deadly serious about their instrument. The correct style for playing the thing is set in stone, and a good player is judged not by his/her creativity or expressiveness, but by the precision and accuracy with which s/he executes the received style and the correct ornamentation. It's the most deliriously loud instrument this side of the electric guitar, but pipers still manage to manage to take the fun out of it.

    All just IME of course.

    I'd mention classical guitarists as well.
     
  10. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    I had to Google "Pink Oboe" 'cause I'd never heard of that....even though I saw Peter Cook on The Secret Policeman's Ball years ago. Obscure insult there, markjames.......;)
     
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  11. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This is very true, and one of the reasons why I have not been able to muster the gumption to continue lessons.
    There is ONE WAY and ONE WAY ONLY.

    My pipes instructor informed the class that the pipes were invented by the Vikings, who gifted them to the Scots as a joke, being that the instrument is very difficult to master, and even then, it still sounds like a cross between a bleating goat and iron being wrent apart.
    The thing is (according to my instructor,) the Scots never got the joke :)
     
  12. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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    I met two symphony violinists here at a Christmas dinner. They were very nice, and very curious, but one of them was also very high.

    I told them I'd like to make violins, which opened them up to talking about violins in general (something i'm sort of doing reconnaissance on). I asked them what makes a good violin and what are the players looking for, as the guy who got me into building guitars also has some violins in professional symphonies (though he also doesn't play violin) and it would be interesting to make some crappy ones.

    They mentioned that there was a maker (I'm not familiar with violin makers) who everyone loved his violins, they were very open and full of volume, but then he was accused of making the tops thinner than other people as well as baking them (torrefying), and his violins fell out of favor with buyers.

    I mentioned that such things are popular in guitars, too, but most people don't mind them (other than the thin tops making guitars a bit too boomy and bright in some cases). Didn't get much of a response.

    The maker I know uses wood that was cut a few hundred years ago, which probably behaves a lot like torrefied wood (and it's not that expensive to get compared to the price of violins, anyway). So, I'll be torrefying tops - that's what I learned from them :) They liked the sound, but apparently it's not socially acceptable compared to using old wood.

    My former making friend (who is on a youtube video making violins and a harpsichord at colonial williamsburg) sold his violins easily while he was working, but has two left of his own make, and nobody will touch them for $5k (whereas it sounds like the typical domestic well regarded maker is getting somewhere around $20K a violin), despite many of his violins that sold through the museum (probably with his mark in them somewhere) being in current large city use.

    (so, though I didn't find the players to be super serious in a social context, it sounds like they're really rigid about what's allowable in their violins. If a violin sounds great, but there's an allegation of doctoring of the materials in a good way - it falls out of favor. I find that part a bit odd! Maybe torrefying would make good sounding violins too common and easily accessible).
     
  13. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I think pretty much anyone who's identity is a little too wrapped up in playing whatever they play risks looking a little too serious about it. We train to physically manipulate funny-shaped objects in ways that our bodies are not naturally disposed to do. The results can be absolutely beautiful, but the process has an absurdity to it.

    That being said, the few sax players I've met seem to have had disproportionately large sticks up their butts. Very serious talk from dudes who need special plumbing to clean out their spit after blowing their golden tubes.
     
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  14. StrangerNY

    StrangerNY Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I know that guy! :) I won't name names, but there's a guy out here on LI who is just a ridiculously good pedal steel player. I went and checked him out one night and was seriously impressed, and I went to tell him so after their set. The guy, as good as he was on his instrument, could barely relate on a personal level. I told him how good I thought he was, and he pretty much blew me off. Weird.

    - D
     
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  15. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    PSG is an instrument that requires exta dedication to master, IMO.
    I get that.
    You have to temper tune them.
    PITA!
    I can operate one myself.
    I have a love/hate relationship with it.
    I love the sound, hate the battle to get, keep, and play it in tune.
    Most of the biggest offenders (again, just my opinion) are the Emmons/jazz devotees.
    The expect the same degree of dedication/perfection from all others on the bandstand.
    They are often deafening with their 200W+RMS amps, and often cannot resist the urge to overplay.
    They feel a great need to bully, and “teach”.
    My solution is to never hire them.
    I still play with a few, but they hire me.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019
  16. StrangerNY

    StrangerNY Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    As someone who has tried for over 20 years and can still only play enough to get by, I can relate! People ask me why I don't play it more, but they don't realize that the sheer amount of maintenance and setup time involved (not to mention the weight of a pedal steel in a flight case!) sucks the joy out of the time spent playing it.

    That's why I've been looking to buy a double 8 lap steel. Even if it's more cumbersome than my old MSA, just the lack of having to do pedal adjustments and such would be a joy by comparison.

    - D
     
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  17. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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    Do you think he knew what either jacobs ladder was? I'd bet not. Humorless people are hard to read, because they don't get jokes and when they get them, they don't like them. Their reaction is usually the same either way.
     
  18. TigerG

    TigerG Tele-Holic

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    For any such musicians, I prescribe a dose of Hound Dog Taylor, who was just all about the joy of playing and havin' a real good time

     
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  19. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    I don't know about seriousness per se, but classical singers seem awfully focused on themselves, and everything about themselves. Everything about them is geared towards performance and presentation.

    They were known for being the bottom level students in theory classes (with exceptional cases). Percussion players did the best in theory classes.
     
  20. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    classical solo violinists

    there are a zillion of them, so competition is so stiff you wouldn't believe the level of neuroticism involved

    I've also never known a "happy go lucky jazz player" on any instrument

    well, maybe drums

    piccolo players have fun: they only need to learn one piece! lol
     
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