I will be starting my first album. any advice welcome.

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by Marquee Moon, May 15, 2019.

  1. muudcat

    muudcat Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I read some interesting advice from Brad Paisley, yes that guy, and he said instead of spreading yourself thin with 10 or so songs concentrate on the best song you have and get the best producer you can afford. I wish I'd had that info when I recorded a full length, 10 song, CD. I had good musicians and a so so producer to help but it cost a lot and I'll never sell the run of 1k CD's. It was well recorded with good performances and great art work, but not commercially viable
     
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  2. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity

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    Don't use as much compression on the mix as the producer and engineer want.
     
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  3. Jakeboy

    Jakeboy Tele-Afflicted

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    I HATE recording to a click...so if I am recording guitar or bass alone, I use a real drum groove to build on. That’s just me.
    Do not be fraud to commit..,what I mean is, if you find a great sound on a guitar, bass, or any other instrument and are using say. A Marshall amp But you LOVE the way your Belle Epoch delay sounds with it...commit to that and record it, as opposed to the idea, well, I can always add echo later.

    If you find a great tone or sound....RECORD IT!
     
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  4. Jakeboy

    Jakeboy Tele-Afflicted

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    +1 on the mastering too. Get a good mix and LIGHTLY use compression to even it out and help polish it up.

    Lastly, and MOST importantly, GET IT RIGHT AT THE MIC. That was the best advice ever given me for recording.
     
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  5. Masmus

    Masmus TDPRI Member

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    24 Track is correct especially with reverb, record your amp dry and add reverb later on an aux bus with a high pass filter this will cut mud out of the verb, if you record your guitar with reverb you can't eq the reverb without changing the guitar.
     
  6. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Meister

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    well, I have a deluxe reverb I'll be using. The reverb is pretty big part of the sound. Other than the reverb and maybe vibrato I won't be using any pedals or anything. The plate reverb or digital reverbs don't really sound as good to me. I don't crazy with the spring reverb though. I'm pretty tasteful with it.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2019
  7. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Meister

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    That's an interesting philosophy. I hear david bowie's heroes was recorded like that, with the phaser effect on the bass. I tend not to use any pedals like most people my age do. I just my amps natural tube distortion and spring reverb, or very rarely vibrato.
     
  8. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    -My biggest advice is this: Find a drummer who is dead on cadence wise and ditch the clik trac. We finished our album last year and used a clik trak. It's distracting as hell, and I feel like it makes you play "mechanical". Like a machine. Even if you play perfect the "feel" isn't great. There are many nuances in songs (or should be) and some that can't be done with a clik trac.
    -The trouble is a few years back, we did a demo disc of covers. We had no idea how much the songs were speeding up! Once done it was like "arghh" WTF? I measured the speed on one song.. it increased 20% beginning to end!
    -Watch out for the studio engineer who want to put delay and reverb on too much. Add your own or ask if it can be done later.
    -
     
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  9. kennl

    kennl Tele-Afflicted

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    Go with the studio / producer / engineer that knows drums.
    Most studios can get the guitar, bass and vocals recorded properly, but a good drums sound can be a challenge.
     
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  10. Bob Womack

    Bob Womack Tele-Holic

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    As a recording engineer/producer I suggest you take a nice camera in with you and shoot plenty of pix to remember your experience with. Other than that, chill about the clock and encourage, encourage, encourage.

    I've actually got a page of suggestions on my site if you can stand to read through 'em. They are HERE.

    Bob
     
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  11. t-ray

    t-ray Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Awesome list! Thanks for sharing.
     
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  12. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    Go analog
     
  13. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Meister

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    can you expand on that? The place i'm going to has a very large live room with 2 booths for separation for the guitars, great vintage mics. That should be some indication they know what they are doing, right?
     
  14. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire

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    To the above have you talked with the engineers/producer if you’re using one about what you’re looking for sonically? And given them some benchmarks? Reference tracks, artists etc?

    While I like to geek out on gear and techniques and all of that at the end of the day it all comes down to songs, songs, songs, Which also gets into arrangement, preparation and performance. I think whatever you can do in advance to get you to be relaxed enough to perform well but still with some nervous energy to give your performance some edge. Do what you need to in advance to let the engineer and /or producer take care of the technical stuff. You need to be focused on the performance. And solely on the performance once you get there and get set up. So, get what kind of sound you’re aiming for communicated with before hand. You’re the artist. Be the artist. Let the technical dudes do their thing. Unless they aren’t getting it. But trying to wear too many hats rarely works. If the performance isn’t there you have nothing. That has to be your focus once you enter the studio. Do what you need to do beforehand to make that happen.

    And then, when you’re there, make magic.

    And most importantly have fun!

    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
  15. kennl

    kennl Tele-Afflicted

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    Should be an indication, but will not guarantee a great drum sound. That is a result of gear / room / engineer and ears. I did a recording with a session drummer at his favorite studio - run by a drummer - and the results were amazing. The house kit was set up for the room and mics. The drummer brought a few snares. No need to "fix it in the mix", since everything sounded great as tracked. I have also recorded at studios with "name" gear that the engineer did not really understand, and the results were average, at best. I would audition a few studios and determine which is most capable at getting the sound you are after. In my experience, the drum sounds will be the obvious reason for your selection.
     
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  16. kiwi blue

    kiwi blue Tele-Afflicted

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    Sounds like you are already on the right track and thinking the right way. Do as much prep as you can without getting tired and stale on it (which you are already doing).

    Get your sound right in the room. Including the amp reverb if that's part of your sound. Don't say oh well, we'll fix it in the mix.

    Get your performance right.

    It starts with a great sound and performance. The engineer then has to start with mic choice, mic positioning, and positioning in the room. If all that is done well, the mixing will go well. You don't want to fix it in the mix. You want to enhance it in the mix.

    Don't worry about how much compression or whatever the engineer is using. All that is for the mixing stage. Just get the performance and the capture right. Let the engineer do their job.

    When it comes to mixing, then you need some discussion going on, but most mixers will not want the client sitting in. They will want to be able to follow their own noses, then present you with a mix and make sure you're happy with it. It might be a good idea to mix one song then discuss with the engineer, who then has some guidance for doing the rest of the songs.
     
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  17. kiwi blue

    kiwi blue Tele-Afflicted

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    It's probably also a good idea to aim for guide vocals only to start with. Perhaps lay them down when tracking drums and bass. Once all the instruments have been tracked, then go back and do finished vocals.

    If you don't have much studio experience you may get a surprise when tracking vocals. I know that early on I'd record a vocal and think I'd given it a good effort, only to feel deflated when hearing the how lifeless the playbacks sounded. I found that if I "over-acted" with the vocal expression, it came out about right.

    It's worth spending extra time on getting the best vocals you can. It's your vocal that delivers the song. There needs to be a sense of urgency, that the singer is saying something that matters and you (the listener) need to hear this, not going through the motions or treating the lyrics as just something to pin a melody on. If you can get that across any minor vocal issues won't matter.
     
  18. codamedia

    codamedia Friend of Leo's

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    I'm not sure what you are expecting for an end result.... but an 8 hour session doesn't go very far if you are looking to record a "handful of tunes". Seriously.. it takes a lot longer than you think it does. If musicians struggle when the clock is rolling the problem is compounded. That doesn't include mixing. Again, it depends on what type of end results you want, but any producer/engineer I work with can spend 4 - 8 hours on a single mix when preparing anything but a demo.

    As for the click track... that is dependent on the drummer. NEVER put the click in everyone's ears because everyone play differently to a click. If the drummer is comfortable with it, give it to him. The click keeps the drummer in time and the drummer keeps the band in time. PRACTICE THIS before trying it in a studio for the first time.

    There are some great songs that were not recorded to a click track, but there were a lot more great songs that were.
     
  19. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Meister

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    will use alot of analog gear like the board and effects, but tape just isnt in my budget at this point.
     
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  20. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Meister

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    We are just going to track the rhythm section for 3 songs. We will be recording live with booths for the two guitars and bass, and the drums in the live room by themselves. Mixing and overdubs will come later. I played with the drummer.He is very good and we play well together, so I don't think we'll need a click. We are going to rehearse alot for this aswell.
     
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