Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

I think Fender Neck Angles are Slightly off, anyone else notice this??

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Yamariv, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. TimTam

    TimTam Tele-Meister

    157
    Jun 4, 2010
    Melbourne
    I've seen a shim used to tilt the neck up slightly (not down like most shims) that made this problem quite a bit better, as long as the bridge had room to also bring the strings down to keep the action playable. Without it all the strings buzz from about the 5th fret up unless the action is set too high. Basically it makes the ski jump 'up-slope' flatter, ie closer to parallel with the body. Can be combined with putting in some fret fall-away. If the alternative is a re-fret or new neck then it can be a 'last ditch' option.
     

  2. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Mar 3, 2003
    Athens-GREECE
    +1000

    the op thinks he has reinvented the wheel but he definitely hasn't ;)
     
    Tootone likes this.

  3. Asmith

    Asmith Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    21
    Nov 27, 2014
    Morley, England
    Why are people going on about the neck and body angle difference? Here's my exaggerated diagram,

    img008.jpg


    On both diagrams cover up the body. What do you have left? A neck, nut, saddle and string. Do they look any different other than one has been rotated? No, they're the same and you apply that to any neck shape you want even if it's a ski jump or twisted at the end of the day the strings that form a straight line are fixed to one point on the neck at the nut and the saddles then adjust the angle made between the neck and string. The shape and orientation of that body can be whatever, it's there for the player to have something to hold onto and make some kind of rigid connection between the bridge and the neck and plays no part in playability other than it's ergonomics.

    A shim is something that is designed to correct a sloppy neck and neck pocket joint so that the bridge can be used to find the optimum string height which is posible as long as the strings can be raised from unusably low to unusably high.
     

  4. TimTam

    TimTam Tele-Meister

    157
    Jun 4, 2010
    Melbourne
    If you mean where I was talking about making the ski slope "flatter" ('closer to parallel with the body'), well a slope by definition has to be described in relation to something, otherwise it's not a slope. ;)
     

  5. Asmith

    Asmith Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    21
    Nov 27, 2014
    Morley, England
    The slope is in relation to the neck, if you take the neck off the body the problem still exists that the neck is warped, it doesn't magically go away because you don't have a body to compare it to.
     

  6. TimTam

    TimTam Tele-Meister

    157
    Jun 4, 2010
    Melbourne
    So a slope (that could be anywhere on the neck) is "in relation to" where on the neck ? Pick any point on the neck. That could be the flat part, or it could be the part with the upslope or the downslope. Without an external reference to relate it to you're somewhat in the dark.
     

  7. Asmith

    Asmith Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    21
    Nov 27, 2014
    Morley, England
    Bingo! Any part of the neck, choose the heel surface the headstock straighten out the nexk perfectly straight using the truss rod, all of these surfaces should be parallel with the direction that points from the nut to the heel. As I said if a neck is warped on a body it's still warped off the body and sticking a shim under the heel doesn't fix it.
     

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