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I roasted a maple billet in my home oven

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by PingGuo, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    72
    May 1, 2003
    Jacksonville, FL
    Sorry, but ignoring the "tap tone" test is a good move.. I was complimenting you..

    Taping wood only reveals the resonant frequency of a section of wood... it has little if any significance regarding the final sound of the guitar. and as the wood is machined that frequency will change....


    The only time tapping wood can demonstrate anything remotely useful is once the guitar is assembled..

    r
     
  2. Maricopa

    Maricopa Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    52
    Feb 4, 2009
    Phx, AZ
    But.....Paul Reed Smith does it and people love his guitars mo' better than anything else! :cool:
     
  3. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    654
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    I've seen some of the best and brightest do it too. I think most of them really believe it's part of their process.

    IDK what's in his heart but my guess is that when it comes to PRS himself... He's just a good salesman (I own 2 US PRS)
     
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  4. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    67
    Dec 23, 2009
    Rocklin Ca.
    I've been giving this some thought I put some scraps in the weber previous post. Now I did read the process I’s done in a kiln with a vacuum but no explanation on why you need a vacuum. The only reason I can come up with if you have a vacuum your puling all the oxygen out so there’s no chance of a fire. I also was looking for a pick-ax handle and came across a video of wood handles being heated up with a large propane torch (roofer’s torch) that led to “flame treating wood”. So I really don’t think a vacuum is necessary. I could see it would be a good for a large commercial scale operation. If anyone finds information on why a vacuum is needed please post a link.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2018
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  5. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    654
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    My understanding is that the vacuum is not where the magic is. But it does make it easier on an industrial scale. Especially if you want to do it quickly, since you can get the temp hotter with less fire risk.

    The flame treatment you described (I haven't seen the specific video) is a finishing technique and does not produce the same results as torrification. Though I think blowtorched fences and axe handles look really pretty.

    The main goal of the torrification is the increased rot resistance and dimensional stability. The color is just a nice side effect.

    The rot resistance doesn't matter all that much for luthiers. And maple is already reasonably stable. But it does enable a zero finish maple neck with less risk. And it makes the surface of the wood hold a glass like finish from just high grit sanding.

    One of the things that makes all of this confusing is that torrefaction is usually explained from the "biomass fuel" perspective (ie the wiki article on it).

    Here's the cleanest explanation I've come across:

    THE PROCESS OF ROASTING

    During the process, water, sugars, and resins are cooked off, leaving behind cellulose and lignum. Lignum is the glue that binds the cellulosic fibers together. Curing in this process increases the stability of the piece. Distribution of lignum is optimized and made consistent throughout the piece, resulting in greater stability of the wood.

    Source: http://www.americanspecialtyhardwoods.com/roasting/
     
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  6. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    67
    Dec 23, 2009
    Rocklin Ca.

    "industrial scale" that the word I was looking for. "rot resistance doesn't matter all that much for luthiers" I'm sure I'm not the only one that has buried a guitar or two:lol:
     
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  7. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 19, 2006
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    Does the wood warp or twist sometimes in the heating process?
     
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  8. bodevelho

    bodevelho Tele-Meister Gold Supporter

    140
    May 19, 2018
    EUA
    . . .and you could slow cook some ribs at the same time!
     
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  9. papaschtroumpf

    papaschtroumpf Tele-Holic

    637
    Nov 24, 2015
    Colorado
    I roasted a slab of poplar for a body while back and it didn't smell like cookies. Smelled kinda bad actually, but I liked the result with poplar.
     
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  10. Newbcaster

    Newbcaster Tele-Holic

    Age:
    44
    509
    May 10, 2015
    Gilbert
    Is anyone else as surprised as I am that baking off all that moisture didn't jicky that wood up something fierce( didn't twist the wood up into something unusable)????

    It looks the bomb though and I'm glad that it worked.
     
  11. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    It doesn't twist at all. I did a couple of pieces of maple and the only issue I had was my oven isn't quite big enough so I had to angle it in and the ends were touching the walls of the oven. So the ends were quite a bit darker and I was lucky enough that I had one board that I could use.
     
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  12. Artslap

    Artslap Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    Age:
    50
    752
    Mar 17, 2014
    Sydney, Australia
    Question to the Mad Kitchen scientist: Is the change in appearance only on the surface? Or more than "bark" deep?

    CP.
     
  13. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    654
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    Definitely possible. Especially with thinner slabs. But I don't have enough experience with the process to know what all the possible outcomes look like.

    It should be all the way though. I haven't cut into my slab yet as I've been busy making new jigs. But I'll get to start milling it soon.
     
  14. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

    I did it in my kitchen oven for my 2012 Challenge build. See post #33 or so. I believe it was in the area of 375 degrees for about 1.5 hours. It gave the hard maple a really nice tawny color that was consistent throughout the blank. It made the wood sand similarly to a very old banjo neck I was working on at the time. There’s a little science around it too in the post if interested.
    Rob
     
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  15. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    654
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
    Sounds cool! Will you link to it here?
     
  16. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

    Not quite sure how to do that. It is in the 2012 Challenge section at the top of the DIY main page.
     
  17. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    654
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
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  18. TwangToInfinity

    TwangToInfinity Tele-Holic

    Age:
    52
    775
    May 2, 2013
    Twangville
    that is a pretty neat thing roasting the maple like that in the kitchen ha and thanks for describing the smell i was curios about that!

    i am getting more and more interested in this roasted maple thing, my worst neck is like a big green log!
     
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  19. PingGuo

    PingGuo Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    654
    May 19, 2014
    North FL
  20. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

    In the commercial implementation of this practice, pulling a vacuum definitely speeds up the process and makes it fire-proof. Can you imagine the first commercial concern trying to implement the process and the look they got from their insurance agent when they said they were going to “roast” 10,000lbs of maple in-house in a big kiln in the middle of their wood shop. The application of vacuum technically saved their bacon there and peeled the insurance guy off the ceiling.
     
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