I need advice on a Nashville B-Bender.

Discussion in 'B-Bender Forum' started by Digiplay, Jun 9, 2019.

  1. Digiplay

    Digiplay TDPRI Member

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    Before I ask any questions, let me give you the back story :) :) :)


    Since I was 10 years old, I've learned to play drums, bass guitar and piano, but for some reason, not guitar.


    Fast forward to 5 years ago, and I decided I needed to record all the original songs I've always heard in my head, so I buy a computer and Logic Pro X.

    If it's relevant, my originals are:
    1) Pop.
    2) New Country/Old Country.
    3) R&B.
    4) Contemporary Jazz.
    5) A little Rock and Roll every now and then.


    All I'm doing is recording demo's, and my best friend (who happens to be a lifelong guitar player with tons of gear like Dusenberg's, Les Paul's, Fender Custom Shop's, PRS', Marshall Amps, Fender Amps, Orange Amps, Axe FX II, etc.), plays all my guitar tracks.


    About 3 months ago I decided why not try to learn how to play a guitar, and low and behold, the one I decided would be the best one to buy first was a Telecaster :)


    I've tried the MIM Nashville, but I didn't think it had enough twang.


    So I tried an American Special (I liked it), a Road Worn 50's (I liked it), a 50's Baja (I liked it), and a Brad Paisley (I liked it).


    I'll interject here that ALL of them sounded GREAT, but the downside is how do I pick just one, as I'm ready to move on to the creative phase of guitar playing instead of trying ANOTHER Telecaster, and as I said, this Telecaster will be for recording only, not live playing (if I ever played live, I'd want a REAL guitar player :) ).



    Please note that I ONLY WANT ONE TELECASTER at this point, so please guys/dolls, don't say you can never have too many guitars!!!!




    Which leads me to the point of all my above babbling.....................................................................




    I have another friend who wants to sell me his mint condition 2012 Nashville B-Bender, and while it weighs 9 lbs. 4.8 oz., it sounds NOTHING like the MIM Nashville I tried, and it has TONS OF TWANG!!!!!!!!



    I'll even go out on a limb here and say that even if I NEVER use the B-Bender (which of course I will), its a GREAT sounding/playing Telecaster in its own right, and it gives ANY of the aforementioned guitars a run for their money!



    So the question is whether the Nashville B-Bender would cover more basses than the Paisley/50's Baja/Road Worn 50's/American Original 50's/American Special/American Standard/Professional, etc. guitars would?




    And btw, I LOVE playing the guitar, and I took to it like a fish in water, and I wish I would have learned to play it earlier!!!!!!!!!!
     
  2. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

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    I absolutely love mine. It's all stock, and I have no urge to mod it. Came with standard American tele pickups, plus a Texas Special. Plenty of twang, plus some very useful tones when I kick in the middle pickup. Apart from custom builds, I can't think of a more versatile model.

    If you stick with it then sooner or lately you're going to want another guitar, regardless, but this is a fine place to begin.

    Plus, I'm pretty sure they've stopped making these, so a good opportunity to nail down one in good condition.

    Good luck!
     
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  3. Digiplay

    Digiplay TDPRI Member

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    Thanks, and you are correct that they discontinued making them in 2015.

    And.........................................................................

    the one I can buy from a friend looks literally brand new!
     
  4. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

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    Unless you pay way over the odds, or wreck it, or lose it, you're always going to get your money back.
     
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  5. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    duplicate post from your other thread.

    An often overlooked question. How much do you want to spend ? This is not a question of owning just one Tele. Its well beyond that.

    The stock Fender PG guitars are very nice, will serve your purposes just fine, but expect to pay in the +/- $1200 range for a good used one. Be it the 3 Pup nashville or the 2 Pup earlier series. With a little bit of adjusting here and there, the PG system performs fine.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "added note with regard to the Fender PG"

    The PG may have some issues which are easily fixed.

    1) Strings break at the top of the string tower which means there is a ruff edge or burr which needs to be filed down smooth where the string glides across the top of the tower. Strings should not break. If it does it's not the string gauge, it's something else.
    2) The B String doesn't line up ( backside) when installing it. You have to remove the entire system and adjust the pull rod to the tower so the string hole lines up thru the body.
    3) pulling noise ( squeaks) across the saddle, common for many benders, a dab of lube resolves this.
    4) you can't adjust the pull tension, well not without drilling a few more holes in the pull arms to move the spring and tighten it up.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    OK, moving on, you select a Tele that you like, doesn't matter which one. Now you send it off and have a custom Bender installed in the $600 to $700 range.

    Here's what you need to know out of the gate. The Fender strap pull PG guitars, to do any maintenance what so ever requires removing the B string , then removing the PG system which is plate mounted. The PG system is mounted to the big plate which fits into the routed cavity. ( thats the GREEN ( the G ) design) making it production friendly.

    The custom installed strap pull systems are opposite, they are built INTO the guitar routed cavity, they are now part of the guitar. You remove a plexiglass cover and do whatever you need to do, the B string stays in-tact. Removing the wood and adding a few metal parts is a zero sum weight factor.

    Then of course you may be considering a palm lever or hip pull system. Which is totally different.

    I own a 2012 Fender Nashville PG guitar , its a fine player, a tad heavy but none the less, I like it, but it's not my primary Bender. The Primary is an 08 USA Fender which I sent off to Forrest Lee jr. Killer quality and performer. I have the pull tension set to max. This guitar comes to every gig. I've owned it now for maybe 3 or 4 months, the B to C# pull is steady as a rock. This guitar is strung with 9's which places an 11 as the B string.

    I've owned several Fender PG's, should have kept them all . Just one of those things I guess. I also own a Gibson Music City jr with a Glaser system, it can be a G or a B. I don't play this one much as I need to bring it to the guitar tech and have the frets dressed down from whatever they are to near 40 thousands. I think they are typical Gibson Les Paul, 50 thou or maybe higher. Its just too different from the telecasters. Nice guitar though, it can be a daily player once the frets are dressed.

    So it's not a question of just ONE guitar, it's a question of how much do you want to spend and which ONE guitar ?

    Others will comment ( hopefully) that there are even more systems and installers available, Evans, Glaser etc...How about a McEwen system? It mounts to the back of the body .

    When buying a B Bender, consider the pull system ahead of pups and such, those can be changed at any time, the pull system cannot be changed.

    Warning though, when you start playing a Bender and getting acclimated to the various pull positions, theres no going back . It may very well become an addiction ! ( A good one )
     
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  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    What Tony said.

    But I don't notice anything about the price. PG benders don't add a huge amount to resale value, plus it's a HEAVY guitar, which is a negative - and you WILL want to upgrade before long if you are serious about guitar (and the bender does tend to be an addictive tool - learn to use it a sparingly and listen to a lot of Clarence White and Bob Warford, avoiding "fake pedal steel" - which always sounds weird.

    With practice the B-bender guitar becomes a different musical instrument. You no longer play it like a "guitar", as the bender is so ingrained in your playing your mind completely shifts gears the minute you pick one up.

    Tony had Forrest make his adjustable unit, an idea that came from Dave Evans, who makes the Pull String benders - IMO (and many others) the absolute top of the bender world - adjustable throw length, pull tension, and the weight usually adds zero to the guitar. With the Nashville you're buying a "guitar with a bender" - but when you move up, you'll be experienced enough to hunt for and buy THE Tele for you - a guitar that feels and sounds exactly how you want it - and THEN you send it off to have the bender of your choice installed.
     
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  7. Digiplay

    Digiplay TDPRI Member

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    All of you have given great input, and that is much appreciated!

    As far as buying my friends mint B-Bender, part of me is thinking that since it hasn't been made for years, hopefully it will retain/possibly increase in value, not to mention that it's a fine guitar.
     
  8. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

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    In a way, it's like everyday real estate: you usually make your money when you buy, not when you sell. Unless you pay wildly over the odds, you'll be starting out OK. And then you just have to avoid selling it in a fire sale situation, where you've got to have cash yesterday and buyers can scent a bargain.

    I recently saw a local ad for a used one in top condition, and am half thinking about making an offer just because I like my current one so well.
     
  9. davidge1

    davidge1 Friend of Leo's

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    If you're new to guitar playing, is a guitar with a b-bender really what you want? There's a lifetime of music in a guitar... so much to learn. Unless you're a fairly experienced player already, I would think a b-bender would just be a distraction. An experienced player would already have some idea of how to use one tastefully and creatively, so it makes more sense. I think it's a tool for someone who's really focused on being a lead guitar player.

    Just curious, is there a way to de-activate the bender so you could play the guitar without it getting in the way if you ended up finding it distracting?

    In any case though, I'd definitely recommend choosing a guitar based what you like, not on resale value.
     
    Matt G likes this.
  10. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

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    In the OP's other thread, he makes it sound like he really likes the guitar itself.

    I agree with whoever wrote that the bender should be approached as a different instrument, but underlying that is simply a finely-built Fender USA Telecaster. And unless the bender's been tinkered with, or a person's throwing it around like a madman, the bender won't bend by accident.

    Side benefit: for anyone wanting to learn the fretboard, chord structure and triads on a guitar, the bender is a great learning tool.

    The other bender enthusiasts might see some downsides (other than weight).
     
  11. Digiplay

    Digiplay TDPRI Member

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    Yes, I do really like the way the guitar plays, is built, feels, sounds, and looks (it REALLY looks GREAT)!


    As far as the weight, two questions:
    1) Will it matter in a studio situation where I most likely will be sitting down?
    2) In the world of a LOT of GREAT guitars (some of them not a Fender :) ), is 9 lbs. 4.8 oz. considered a really heavy guitar?
     
  12. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm just a back porch player, not a pro. Since I don't play the bender standing up, or for hours at a rip, the weight doesn't bother me a bit. It also helps that I have a huge padded strap for the thing.

    Others with more experience in studio work and gigging will have more to say. Also, you might check out some other threads that cover the weight question. It's one of those things where you start with a seemingly simple question (eg is 'x' a comfortable weight / guitar) and may end up in a whole different place (eg will 'x' cause me hand, arm or back problems if I do 'y' for 'z' years).
     
  13. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    far from a distraction if just learning to play guitar.

    yes, you can add another strap button, many add one to the neck plate, or how about just don't pull the B !

    Is still a guitar, if pulling the B becomes something you love to do, it's a style of execution.

    Resale value of the Fender PG's seem to have stabilized. They are nice USA made Tele's and I doubt they will decrease in value, maybe not increase but remain stable.

    What Jim ( silverface) states above is absolutely solid truth, once you begin playing out of the various pull positions and add them to your playing style,it is now a different instrument, per sey, you have taken it beyond a stock 6 string'er. When you go back to a stock 6 string you will be hunting for that extra addition, looking for your "home" phrases. This is why so many players have more than one bender guitar.

    grab one, you won't be sorry !

    Oh yeah, you can play a strap pull guitar sitting down ! The guitar doesn't know you a e sitting. :)
     
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  14. Digiplay

    Digiplay TDPRI Member

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    And what is the price they have stabilized at, especially for a mint/looks new one?
     
    T Prior likes this.
  15. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    There are enough great Teles out there in this day and age that "liking" one shouldn't be enough. Get one that you LOVE. You'll know it when you play it. So, keep trying them out in person, and don't rush it.
     
  16. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    It appears that $1200 +/- is the range for a nice clean factory Fender PG/ B bender. We see them with a higher asking price but the sell price is near that $1200 mark. Rarely do we see them selling for less, but you may get lucky !

    I've owned 3 or 4, still own one. When I sold them they were in that price range, when I bought them , they were in the same price range. I believe I paid $1225 for the 2012 Nashville I have which is pretty much like new. This was maybe a year ago.

    That being said, if you find a nice tele that you really like , maybe in the +/- $800 range, you can send it off for around $650 and have a custom Bender system installed. So paying more than $1200 to $1400 for a Fender PG is really not a good deal, as you can get the guitar you really like with a custom install for near that same price.

    As I commented above, while I do have the Fender PG, my go to Bender is a 2008 USA which I acquired used from GC for $799, its an awesome guitar for me, then I sent it off to Forrest Lee jr . this particular guitar is nothing special appearance wise, ( 3 color SB ) but playability is as close to my 52 RI's as I could ever want. I was shocked that nobody bought it from the used wall at GC before me. But then again, I was told it was only in the store 1 week ! The 2012 nashville PG is a good player as well, but not my favorite.

    options !
     
  17. Digiplay

    Digiplay TDPRI Member

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    Let me start out by saying how much I appreciate all my fellow Forum Members input, and I apologize for what some might say are crazy questions/thoughts :)



    Input on this hopefully final question will make me buy my friends B-Bender or not, so here it is...........................



    As previously stated, this 2011 guitar looks literally brand new, it has the original maroon/red plush imterior Fender case, all the case candy, and the tuners were replaced with Fender Locking Tuners, but he still has the original ones neatly boxed up and kept in one of the case compartments.


    Regardless of whether a guitar should be purchased solely for resale value or not, it will not be the number one priority in this case, but it does have some bearing on my question :)


    So if the value of this guitar is, say, $1,200.00 today in its current new condition, if I only play the guitar in my home studio, and obviously if I do that it will eventually show wear/use of some type (hopefully nothing more significant than pickguard scratches/tiny dings, etc.), how much will that affect the resale price of the guitar down the proverbial road?


    If the answer is a LOT, that's not good, but if only a LITTLE, IMHO, that will be offset by the joy and appreciation of playing such a fine guitar, and that kind of value is hard to put a dollar amount on :)


    Thanks in advance!
    Jerry
     
  18. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    NOT a lot.

    Like anything else in our crazy world, anything we own can be worth more TODAY than when we bought it, but tomorrow it could be worth less, given the same day to day economic conditions.

    These are nice USA guitars, regardless of the PG system, they play well and sound good ! The market is pretty good on these and has been very consistent for a fairly long time.

    I see $1100 on the low and $1400 on the very high .

    The problem you are going to have should you dive in to the B Bender world is that you will want another ! Maybe a custom install. Your style of playing will change and when you pick up a traditional 6 string you will know in a NY minute something is missing . You will be searching for your new auto pilot phrases and they will be missing. A "B or G" Bender guitar is not a novelty, it's an instrument. Grand Piano players can't play on a 49 key synth !

    I'm warning you ! :)

    Good luck !
     
  19. Digiplay

    Digiplay TDPRI Member

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    Let's just say I'm mainly concerned with today and two or three years in the future, as I am new to the guitar world (LOVE it btw!), so it will take me longer than that to know/learn what I like and don't like/need. :)
     
  20. Digiplay

    Digiplay TDPRI Member

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    Anyone else? :)
     
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