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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

I know nothing about this, help appreciated

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Vespa_One, Aug 17, 2017.

  1. Vespa_One

    Vespa_One Tele-Meister

    297
    Feb 14, 2017
    United States
    Howdy fine people of the TDPRI:

    I'm in the early stages of a new guitar build, the body blank (poplar) is in the mail. I have built a few guitars and thus far I have finished with stains and Tru Oil. Once I used Deft Spray Lacquer over stain and the results were meh. This time around I'm thinking about painting the guitar. The problem is I do not have a spray gun nor do I have a place to spray inside. I can spray in the backyard.

    Is it possible to paint a guitar with Spray Cans? What color paint should I use? How would you go about getting this finish?

    This is what I would try not knowing my arse from a hole in the ground:

    First I would paint the body about half a can of Rustoleum Painters Touch 2X Satin Apple Red (it is also primer). I'm color blind so it looks close to me but who knows.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Ole...-General-Purpose-Spray-Paint-315396/300456595

    Then I would slap a full can of Rustoleum specialty gloss clear lacquer spray paint.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Ole...s-Clear-Lacquer-Spray-Paint-1906830/100194482

    Easy peezy right?? b5scroll2.JPG I would take my time spraying and let it dry between coats. Maybe sand and buff the clear?

    I have some time to play around with finish ideas and test stuff so I thought I'd seek out the knowledge of the TDPRI. I like the natural finishes I have done so I always have a backup plan! I am not interested in buying a gun at this time.

    If anybody thinks this finished can be achieved without a spray gun let me know how you would do it. Thanks for any input!
     

  2. Nickadermis

    Nickadermis Tele-Meister Ad Free + Supporter

    Age:
    51
    384
    Dec 18, 2016
    Camden Point, MO
    I just ordered rattle cans from Reranch . But mine was Sonic Blue.

    I used Shellac for a first coat, then white primer, then the color coat.... you can tell it was done with spray cans if you really look hard so I don't look hard.
     
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  3. poolshark

    poolshark Tele-Holic

    520
    Mar 20, 2011
    Tallahassee
    For one thing, that's a transparent finish. Solid color paints, like the apple red you mention, aren't intended to let the grain show through. To my knowledge, most of your big box stores aren't going to sell a transparent or translucent finish.

    On another note, not all OTC paints work well together. Moreover, I would be especially wary of trying to cover an enamel - the red - with a clear lacquer. They have different solvent and solid formulas, and are very likely to react poorly and make a mess.

    To that end, I'd recommend you stick with the same brand and type of primer, paint and clear. Ordering from ReRanch is pricey, but you can be certain of compatible paints. If you want something you can pick up locally, I've had good luck with Dupli Color primer and color, available at most auto parts stores, and Minwax or Watco clear lacquer.
     
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  4. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    54
    Feb 16, 2014
    Auburn, California
    I've done a few cheap finishes and a few not-so-cheap. A couple of the cheapo finishes came out very well, a couple not-so-well. Like poolshark says, it ain't gonna be transparent if you use Rustoleum. For a good transparent finish you're gonna want a stain, not paint, under a clear coat.

    Watch for runs, splatter, and bubbles. If you get any you need to sand them out until they're gone completely or you'll forever see them, even if you can't feel them. You can lay down several coats over a few hours (per the can instructions), but make sure to let it dry for a few days between treatments. I've found that even if they say it'll be completely dry after 24 hours that no, it isn't.

    Just did a new pinecaster this week with two coats of Bullseye shellac sealer and then three coats of Miniwax Polyurethane. Probably the simplest finish I've ever done, it's clear with a slight amber tinge. It came out spectacular. I'll be finishing the build in the next week or so and then I'll post pics.
     
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  5. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Meister

    Man, that is the truth!

    I once painted myself into an ugly mess by mixing different manufacturers rattlecan paints. I figured that I never wanted to go through that again so I stuck to products from one manufacturer. But I wasn't as smart as I thought I was, because I did exactly what what you are describing - laquer over acrylic enamel - another ugly curling mess! I had to educate myself and ask questions, which is what the OP is doing. Good Luck, amigo!

    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
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  6. Milspec

    Milspec Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 15, 2016
    Nebraska
    I painted a sunburst tele 2 years ago and it took me about 4 attempts before it turned out looking good. I did borrow a buddy's paint gun though. I offer the following advice:

    1. Shop here for paints and supplies...very impressed by what they offer.

    http://www.eastwood.com/paints/automotive-finishes/colors/candies.html

    2. Find somebody with a gun or even ask the local auto body shop if they would shoot it for you. I worked for one years ago that did that for a small fee as long as he wasn't busy. You can rattle can it, but there will be over-spray along the edges or else a too thin covering that will wear off in those areas quickly.

    3. DO NOT wrap the body in bubble wrap when you are done while you gather the parts to assemble that guitar. I let mine fully dry for a couple of days before wrapping it up during the winter. A month later, there were light bubble patterns in the finish that would not rub out without sanding. You have to look at an angle to see them, but they are there. I tell people that it was done intentionally as part of a custom paint.

    4. Don't paint them outside unless you have to. IF that is the case, pick a very windless day and early in the day before the nats come out. I have had many things spoiled by either wind-blown dirt or little insects becoming stuck to the paint.

    guitarinventory 006.jpg
     
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  7. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Those two materials are NOT compatible. The lacquer will work as a paint remover (I worked for Rust-Oleum for several years in the tech area).

    Enamel like Painter's touch - even the primers - are not suitable for guitar use. Lacquer would give you the best results, but backyard spraying is very, very difficult. Too much contamination (dust, pollen, leaves, dirt etc) flying around, the spray would be nearly impossible to control and you may have temperature issues.

    I honestly have nothing to suggest. Some folks just don't have a good place to spray. If you can find a place please read ALL the material at Guitar Reranch and buy your materials there - they are the only seller that has decent beginner support.
     
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  8. Vespa_One

    Vespa_One Tele-Meister

    297
    Feb 14, 2017
    United States
    Thanks for your reply!
    I'm brainstorming, forgive me. The backup plan is wipe on. How about a red stain or dye? Lmii red analine dye (water or alcohol soluble available) followed by wipe on poly ? If I don't spray can I still get a reddish color with a little sheen to it somehow? The wood is poplar, I've stained poplar with Varathane Oil based and Tru Oil with pretty good results but I don't see any stains from Varathane that are a brighter red. Any suggestions for wipe on?
     

  9. Speedy454

    Speedy454 Tele-Meister

    408
    Oct 1, 2013
    Highland, IL
    Reranch sells tinted lacquer in spray cans. Lots of people use it to do a home made burst. Get a can of amber and a can of red translucent and a can of clear. It will get you where you want to be with minimal effort. If you try stain or dye directly on the wood, you most likely won't be satisfied with the results. Stain is very difficult to get a uniform deep red like that. Dye is better, but still hard to deal with on bare wood. A translucent dye in the clear, like the tinted reranch spray bombs is the way to go. Spray the amber first until a nice honey color is achieved, then lay on the red tint until you are happy. Then lock it all down with clear. If I'm not mistaken, they sell a Gibson SG cherry red look alike that if properly applied will give the color you want.
    Keep in mind that translucent paint goes on in multiple coats. Lay on a couple, let it sit. Lay on a couple, let it sit. It could take 6 or more coats to get the depth of color you want.
    But using this method lets you sneak up on the shade you want.
     
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  10. Speedy454

    Speedy454 Tele-Meister

    408
    Oct 1, 2013
    Highland, IL
    My avatar was done by myself with trans tint red dye mixed with clear lacquer. I probably shot 6 or 7 coats of red to get that shade. I'd have to check my notes. Amber first, then red. I almost always start with a nice amber base. It warms up the final color.
     
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  11. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    The trick with dyes is that they are very hard to control. The color depth can vary unless you apply sanding sealers first (and sand it) and understand the technique for controlling color depth. There are YouTube videos on the subject but it may be a bit hard to find a specific one.

    Wiping stains and polyurethanes are easier - but I would still use sanding sealer. Then, when you apply the stain, if it starts to go too dark you can wipe the area with thinner to "pull" the color out - to a degree.

    No matter what you use it's best to apply the entire system on some smooth-sanded scrap wood - a fairly good sized piece if you've never done it before at all. That way you'll know how every component works - bot individually and with the others. And if you don't like the results you 'll be able to change colors or materials.

    If you work just on your guitar without "practice" you're stuck with whatever you do!
     
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  12. Tomasi

    Tomasi Tele-Meister

    104
    Jan 26, 2016
    Finland
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