Hurricane Michael Thread

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Phrygian77, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. dkmw

    dkmw Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    getbent likes this.
  2. stxrus

    stxrus Friend of Leo's

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    I saw that this morning. Valued at $400,000! That would be $15,000,000+ here. The difference is there would not be stilts. Since our tidal range is about 12” storm surge is much less than in the gulf of farther up yet eastern seaboard

    The good news is, from my perspective, recovery crews are already on the scene & progress has started. Sure it’ll weeks before a lot of power is back on. I hope the linesmen & lineswomen that are on the ground are the same ones that got here as soon as they could. They were fabulous. Poles need to be replaced, lines need to be rerun, & tie ins need to completed. It will take time but it will happen. Trust me on this one

    Remember materials are in short supply. Fires out west, past gulf storms, Atlantic storms & Caribbean storms are all vying for the same plywood, sheet rock , doors, windows, tapcons, etc.

    My new doors are up but far from finished. There is no casing available anywhere. No 5/8s for my pergola so 2x4s will have to be ripped adding to the cost.

    In a case like this, to everyone effected, remember patience. It’s not a virtue but a damned necessity
     
    william tele likes this.
  3. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    Just an idea, why not build these houses on the shore from brick or concrete instead?
     
  4. stxrus

    stxrus Friend of Leo's

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    Reinforced poured brick (plus they had tensioning cables to help control the load) are very strong. Typically the roof & doors are the weakest links. Generally, when the wind gets over 140 it’s grab your ankles time. Over 150 most bets are off

    Because we had to hold our front doors closed from 1:00am-4:00am I am looking into accordion shutters for the front French Doors. Secured from the inside to hopefully not have to do this again. Easy (hopefully) egress if necessary. I’ve already got 88 aluminum panels to cover every other window, french doors, & sliders in the house
     
  5. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Holic

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    Here in the lower Keys, Irma hit us last year with sustained winds of 140MPH. We would have gladly taken those 60 MPH winds. The view of post-Michael Mexico Beach is eerily familiar to the post-Irma Keys.

    I rode out Andrew in my Miami house. It was built by a contractor who built it for his daughter, so poured concrete, trusses strapped down, added support beams, trusses 50% closer together than required by Code, etc. Shoddily built Miami neighborhoods like Country Walk were completely destroyed. Even my neighborhood looked like it had been bombed.

    You can't put a price on your life. If you are going to live in Florida or any other hurricane prone area, spend the extra money and build right. Otherwise you're saving a few bucks but risking it all.
     
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