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How to stop and repair splits in veneer face and back under poly

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Michael A., Jan 13, 2018 at 9:53 PM.

  1. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    798
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    This MIK Squier E7 Bullet has a series of cracks on the back and to a lesser degree on the face. These guitars have a maple veneer in front and rear (see pic 5) over the substrate wood, and are then covered in polyester. From some reading I've done, apparently something in the process in about 1987 caused this splitting to occur somewhat frequently.

    The previous owner used what looks like white glue in the cracks to slow their expansion.

    I would like to repaint the guitar after scuff sanding the existing finish. But I want to make sure the cracks are completely repaired and covered, and don't return after the new paint. I don't want to strip the whole guitar and I don't want to replace the veneer.

    Any suggestions as to how to approach this and get good results? Thanks.
     

    Attached Files:


  2. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Given the parameters of what you want to achieve, and what you don’t want to do, I’d say your only choice would be to clean out whatever the prior owner put into the splits as best you can, then drizzle in med viscosity CA glue, both to adhere the sides together, and fill the cracks. Build them up to level with the finish you want to scuff sand. It’s going to take a good bit of CA, will take a while, and won’t be easy.

    The preferred method to fix what you’ve got, IMO, would be to strip, clean out cracks, fill with CA, sand smooth & paint.
     

  3. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    798
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Thanks for the guidance, Rick! I think I'll follow your suggestions in the first paragraph, since the cracks on this guitar are mostly on the back and only minimal on the face. I'll probably use a tapered diamond burr in my Dremel to clean the cracks and then start the CA drop filling.

    Any thoughts about first drilling a small hole at the very ends of each crack to discourage lengthening? I would of course fill those with CA too.
     

  4. john_cribbin

    john_cribbin Tele-Holic

    794
    Nov 26, 2014
    London
    It's not going to be an easy fix. You can do a perfect repair now, but you can't be certain the wood won't move again in time.

    Rather than drop filling the initial CA into the crack, how about getting some slow setting CA and some insulin hypo's from your local pharmacy. Inject the CA into the crack. You'll still only have a small amount of work time before the hypo glues up, but hopefully enough to get the glue in fairly deep.

    The hypo's are really thin and should get the glue in deeper than letting it wick.

    Good luck!
     

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