How sweet are ovations?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Heaven' started by Mrsamlki, Nov 4, 2011.

  1. jwsamuel

    jwsamuel Friend of Leo's

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    Isn't that a sweeping generalization? ;)

    Jim
     
  2. syrynx

    syrynx Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes, absolutely! :cool:
     
  3. LondonLefty

    LondonLefty Tele-Meister

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    I know the purists hate them, but I've got a mid 90's Balladeer in Cadillac Green and the neck is fantastic. Tonally they can be a bit treble heavy and to be honest as i own an all wood Martin, the ovation gets played a lot less.
    I'm thinking of selling it but was shocked at how little even the Balladeers are worth.
    Maybe I'll hang onto it in the hope that they come back in vogue.
     
  4. wemedge

    wemedge TDPRI Member

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    I have an old Adamas. I love it for sure.
     
  5. Scantron08

    Scantron08 Tele-Afflicted

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    Count me in this camp, along with others. Mike Simpson (and BrookDaleBill and Starman 44) summed up my opinion. I've always thought they were way too thin and tinny sounding and clangy - not like a wooden acoustic sound at all .... which of course makes sense since they weren't made of wood. They do have a good electric pickup as far as acoustic pickups go, but it's still just amplifying a mediocre-sounding guitar, IMHO. Beyond that, I've really never understood their allure.

    In my high school years when I would hang around the music store after school every week, I remember hearing the salesmen always tell people looking to buy one that "this is made out of the same material they use to make helicopter blades." I always wondered, and still do today, "so what?" If I wanted a helicopter blade, I'm sure it's a great material, but I want a guitar made from guitar materials.
     
  6. asatfan

    asatfan Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Well, I wish you could play my old 60's Balladeer. It's one of the fullest, loudest, acoustics I've ever had....and I've had it for well over 40 years. It has a heavy, large, fiberglass bowl. There is nothing "tinny" about mine. The action is more like my electrics. I will admit that a friend started playing Ovations in the late 80's, with the shallow, more plastic-like bowl and they didn't sound anything like my old Balladeer.

    I guess, I would say, if you ever come across an old Ovation...from the 60's, give it a chance.
     
  7. mjaylee

    mjaylee TDPRI Member

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    Absolutely love the round backs, brings me back to the days of my youth, but if i had a nickel for every Ovation I've seen with a crack on the soundboard through the years since the plastic (or whatever they want to call it) back has no give.

    all the nickels wouldn't amount to that much money, like 50 cents at most, but just pointing out that there are a freakish amount of Ovations with surface cracks, especially here in the Northeast when juxtaposed against other manufacturers.
     
  8. DonB52

    DonB52 Tele-Meister

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    Last year, I bought 2 Ovation Celebritys, one for my wife and one for me. We are worship leaders at our church and had been having guitar problems. Hers had a bridge problem and I just wasn't getting the sound from mine. The Ovations fixed the trouble immediately. Since they are virtually identical, the sound is perfectly balanced. With the built-in tuners and the excellent preamp, they make us sound much better than we are. BTW, hers is the full depth with the natural top and mine is a shallow (to accommodate my tummy) in black. The quality of these guitars is very good, and they play smooth and easy. One day, I will get my Taylor, but for now the Ovation is as good as I need.
     
  9. adeiderich

    adeiderich Tele-Afflicted

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    About 5 years ago I was shopping for a new acoustic, I had my heart set on an Ovation. Pulled one off the wall and just couldn't bond with the sound. Ended up buying a Yamaha FT-120 for about the same price. Haven't looked back. YMMV.
     
  10. Scantron08

    Scantron08 Tele-Afflicted

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    Fair enough (it may just be different strokes), but since you compare it to the other acoustics you've had, I have to ask what other acoustics you've had. And since it's "one of" the best, what are the others you considered good?
     
  11. JohnSS

    JohnSS Tele-Meister

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    My late 70's Custom Balladeer is still my main acoustic guitar for any stage use and some studio recording (when a clear fundamental tone vs a fat rich tone is called for). The deep bowl models definitely carry the day much better than the shallow bowls, which only sound full when plugged in. I've also own/owned and recorded with Guild, Goodall, Lowden, Alvarez, Yamaha, Gibson, Greg Bennett, Martin, Taylor, Larrivee, Rainsong, Godin, Takamine and Ibanez Artwood, to name a few, so I think I have a good basis of comparison.
     
  12. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    Never been an Ovation fan, could never quite get used to that round body, I always felt I spent more time keeping it from falling than playing !

    I am a Breedlove and Taylor fan..

    ok I said it

    t
     
  13. SamClemons

    SamClemons Poster Extraordinaire

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    If my Ovation died tomorrow. I could buy pretty much any guitar I wanted (within reason). I would not even think of buying anything but another ovation.

    I don't know how to link to youtube. Check out the triple neck ovation in this Bon Jovi video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VD3pBTK0oA&feature=related
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  14. birddog01

    birddog01 Tele-Afflicted

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    Ovation

    Someday I'll get another. I just need one with a wider neck and Ovations are somewhat limited on wider necks, (at the nut)
    Always watching for a Josh White model thats resonable.;)
     
  15. asatfan

    asatfan Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Yes, I think it is just different strokes. But, to be honest, I'm more of an electric player (I've owned many more electrics than acoustics), but I've owned a couple of Guilds, Gibson Hummingbird, a Takamine, and several old Silvertones, Harmonys, etc. Loved them all, but none sounded better or played better than the Ovation. Never owned a Martin. But, the Ovation is the only guitar that I've owned for over 40 years. I've never considered selling it, not that it would bring much money, but I'll have that thing until I'm gone. Of course, I'd love to have a nice old Martin, and a Gibson Jumbo, but as I said, I gig with an electric and can't justify spending a lot of money on an acoustic....wish I had plenty of money!

    And, by the way, it's had a crack in the top forever. Never gotten any worse in all these years!
     
  16. JDolan121

    JDolan121 TDPRI Member

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    The first guitar I ever bought for gigging was an Ovation Custom Balladeer, in about 1989. I played it thru a small PA with a comp/EQ pedal, and a small chorus/delay unit. Thought it always sounded great. It had beer & liquor spilled on it, knocked over I don't know how many times, took a dive off a stage, landed right on the headstock, and was still in tune when I picked it up. I played that guitar every day until I sold it to a friend in 2004. In all that time, the only thing it ever needed was 1 partial and 1 full re-fret. I would literally take it from 100 degree weather outside into 72 degree air conditioned bars and have no tuning issues, just a little tweak here and there. So yeah, they're not the best sounding guitars unplugged, but for a working musician, they're hard to beat.
     
  17. Spearsmusic

    Spearsmusic Tele-Meister

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    I have a 1984 Adamus collectors edition. 1108/1500. My pops bought it on my 1st birthday. Unplugged they'll get drowned out if you got couple standard acoustics, but plugged in they sound like a million bucks. I'll never trade this guitar and when I gig it's always with me.
    I also have a Taylor 414ce I can't put down. And it sounds great unplugged or plugged in. Only thing about ovations, and it's been said lol. Guaranteed to slip off your knee at least once lol.
     
  18. thelowerlip

    thelowerlip Tele-Afflicted

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    This one is sweet!
     

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  19. oldgofaster

    oldgofaster Tele-Meister

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    I have a standard balladeer, thin bowl, bought new in ?95, my buddy had one and I was in guitar center and could have bought any guitar for around $750.. It seems good to me, loved the neck better than the others I tried. I will always own it as they have poor resale. People who play it also love the neck, but most seem to look down on it as a cheap guitar. It really shines when doing lead lines.
    I also have a used std. baladeer that is at my daughters in FL under a bed. I play it twice a year and it was off ebay for $350(red/purple color). I change the strings and away we go. The neck plays like an electric and it sounds warm unplugged. My grandsons can't hurt it, banging on it.
    I also have a '90s Gibson J45 that sounds warm, but the neck doesn't make me want to do bends and slides.
     
  20. felis

    felis Tele-Afflicted

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    I second that.

    My wife has a 1984 Balladeer, I don’t like the bowl nor the headstock shape, unplugged it gets blown away by my Cat’s Eyes. But when she runs it straight through our Dynacord PM 1600, it excels.
    The neck feels like an electric indeed, very nice.
     
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