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How long dows it take to work out cone cry?

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by Bob Womack, Mar 12, 2018.

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  1. Bob Womack

    Bob Womack Tele-Meister

    The title says it all. How long do I have to go before it works out?

    Bob
     
  2. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    57
    Mar 17, 2003
    Spring City, Pa
    I never knew it worked out.
    Maybe some cone dope
     
    aerhed likes this.
  3. Georox

    Georox Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 30, 2014
    The tan house in AZ
    A long, long way.
     
  4. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Quicker if you have the recone kit shipped overnight delivery.
     
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  5. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

    Nov 5, 2013
    NJ
    Can someone describe "cone cry" to me ?
     
  6. aerhed

    aerhed Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    59
    Dec 24, 2016
    Boulder, WY
    When you get greedy and get two scoops instead of one. Then it falls off halfway to the car and you get cone cry.
     
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  7. jimbo735

    jimbo735 Tele-Afflicted

    Sep 19, 2011
    Michigan
  8. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Same as cone rub. Nasty sound increasing with volume. There is a tiny gap where the voice coil passes through.... something... and the 'cry' is caused by the coil rubbing.

    I don't know why it happens in all cases, but JBLs suffer from it because there was a piece of foam rubber inside the enclosure, and it turns to dust over time. If any of these particles get caught in the gap.... Boo hoo...
     
    jimash likes this.
  9. schmee

    schmee Friend of Leo's

    Jun 2, 2003
    northwest
    Pushed hard a speaker makes a bit of squeak or lower tone buzzy squawk on certain notes and volumes, but not continuously. That's as close as I can get to defining it!
    AFAIK cone cry does not "work out". It could though I suppose. Not sure if it caused by out of round voice coil former most often or something else. Seems more prevalent on speakers with tight voice coil gaps..... I think...
     
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  10. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

    Nov 5, 2013
    NJ
    But.. that doesn't work out, that just gets worse till the speaker quits entirely and is usually an overheated voicecoil, or some crud in the coil as you point out.
    You can't play that out.

    I had an EVM-L-F (for Fender) that exhibited this effect during a recording session, where it was so loud , I did it from the control room.
    Long story short, Fender informed me, that the speaker apparently had had a NAIL fall into the voicecoil, during manufacture, and that this nail had been stuck to the magnet and dancing around in there, and when I turned it up really loud in the studio, it was eating the voice coil. Speaker was replaced.

    EDIT.
    I just had another thought, which is that it is recommended ( sometimes) to occasionally re-install and
    reorient the speaker to prevent the voice coil sagging from gravity, and causing a rub.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2018
  11. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

    Mar 17, 2003
    Lubbock, TX
    Cone cry is not related to voice coil rub. These two things are separate issues. Cone cry occurs in all-paper...no doping....lightweight cones that are being pushed hard. The cone distorts and produces harmonics/Frequencies that are not related to what the player is playing. The same speaker when played with a lower power signal can function normally and sound good. Doping can reduce the effect.
    Voice coil rub will occur with any signal and is a problem that demands either a recentering of the coil or a recone.
     
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  12. thegeezer

    thegeezer Tele-Holic

    Age:
    66
    942
    Jul 5, 2010
    West Michigan
    What Wally said. I can get some cone cry with my original P12R in my '54 Deluxe if it's pushed hard. The cone is very light paper, is not doped and those speakers were only rated at about 12 watts when new. It sounds stunning at low volumes but at certain frequencies when gigging you are going to notice it.

    Conversely, with the '59 P12Q that I currently run in it (about a 14 watt speaker) I don't get any. The paper used to form the cone is apparently just enough heavier that it's not an issue.
     
    Wally likes this.
  13. jguitarman

    jguitarman Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    63
    Oct 14, 2003
    No CA
    I had a speaker that had cone cry and it took three coats of rubber cement glue beorit disappeared. I don't think there's any other way to fix it unless you want to recone which doesn't make sense. Here's a definition of cone cry

    https://www.tedweber.com/speaker-terms/

    Go to the Resources tab and then to Speaker Terms
     
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  14. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh Poster Extraordinaire

    Jun 13, 2013
    Initech, Inc.
    Cone cry occurs when you're giving it too much power; you're pushing it too hard. Get a speaker with a proper power rating for the amp you're using.
     
  15. trouserpress

    trouserpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    55
    459
    May 4, 2015
    Leipzig
    I once managed to cure this by simply turning the whole speaker cabinet upside down.
     
  16. Bob Womack

    Bob Womack Tele-Meister

    I suppose I may be hearing something else, because what I'm hearing isn't happening when the speaker is pushed. In fact, the speaker is rated at 75 watts (a Warehouse G10C) and the amp is rated at 12 watts (it is a '68 custom Fender Princeton). The speaker is new. What I hear is a tiny bit of fizz on some notes when this relatively low, around 2 on the dial. The level of the fizz doesn't increase as the signal increases, in fact you can actually drown it out with a little volume. I've done the round of screws and nuts on the amp and have checked the relationship between the chassis and the drip rail to see if it is a rattle. All the efforts made it almost go away. I suppose this could be a typical irritating combo cabinet rattle. For that matter, it seems to come more from the back of the amp than the front. Funny, huh?

    Bob
     
  17. FenderLover

    FenderLover Friend of Leo's

    Jun 11, 2009
    Minnesota
    You can check for cabinet rattles by sitting on it while you play, then rotate it to a different side. I once discovered a lower back panel that was rubbing on the bottom of the cabinet that way.
     
  18. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

    Feb 15, 2016
    Nebraska
    Beat me to it, that worked on a 1x12 of mine as well. Gave it a 180 and no more issue.
     
  19. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

    Mar 17, 2003
    Lubbock, TX
    I did forget to mention that rotating the speaker 180 degrees will sometimes realign the voice coil and eliminate rub...for some period of time. It may be that in such situations, the cone assembly is too much for the spider to support....things fatigue. Rotating changes the direction of the effect of gravity on those physical components.

    Back to cone cry......
     
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  20. trouserpress

    trouserpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    55
    459
    May 4, 2015
    Leipzig
    If it's a buzz you're chasing (very much likeley with a '68 PR) and FenderLover's proposal won't give you any hint look for a loose screw in the electronic compartment and fasten (or remove) that little cardboard sitting behind the speaker jacks.
     
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