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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

How do you keep your neck blanks straight?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by copachino, May 10, 2017.

  1. copachino

    copachino Tele-Meister

    138
    Oct 11, 2014
    honduras
    Hi all, last year i bought some fine neck blanks already driedat 6% and leve in the house on the closet, i made a neck two month ago and it was fine but, i took the last blank aañ week ao and notice that the blank was warped on one side, the blank its a bit over sided and flatsaw, but im worried that i could never straight the neck, i have already cut the shape and make the rod channel, but im unsure about using the blank or not,


    How do you store your dry wood to prevent warping
     

  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    What's the humidity level in your home? Just because it is in a closet means that it is dry in there.
     

  3. copachino

    copachino Tele-Meister

    138
    Oct 11, 2014
    honduras
    its really high moiture about 17%
     

  4. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Feb 29, 2004
    Portland, OR
    I tape them 6 deep with strong tape, same with fretboards 8 deep. Keep them in a near 50% humidity environment and away from cement...
     

  5. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    17% is high? Are you in the desert? That is very low my friend.
     
    DrASATele likes this.

  6. copachino

    copachino Tele-Meister

    138
    Oct 11, 2014
    honduras
    Sorry i didnt notice i made a mistake its 71 not 17
     

  7. Rich B in Tempe

    Rich B in Tempe Tele-Holic

    Age:
    64
    570
    Apr 20, 2016
    Tempe Arizona
    You could always "heat warp" the neck; with heat, set a slight underbow in the shaft! Ive done it for years, & it works just fine- also i personaly believe 71% is a bit high to leave a jointed neck blank set out!
     

  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    You may want to control the humidity if you can. I have no better answer than that. Most places try to aim for 50% year round through AC and Dehumidification.
     

  9. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    I think Marty is right on.
    Even so it can be difficult, even with a machine, to bring the humidity down. In New England it can go from 17% to 71% in less than 12 hours time from March through Oct/Nov then we have the opposite problem, lack of humidity.
    Balancing the temp will help too as Rich mentioned you can heat warp/bend the blank as well.
     

  10. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

    Jun 5, 2011
    Southeast Florida
    Wood should be stored in a cool dry area with stickers in between each board to allow air flow. It doesn't hurt to add some weight to the top to keep them flat.
     

  11. Bugeater281

    Bugeater281 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    26
    128
    Nov 30, 2016
    Omaha
    I had a lot of trouble keeping blanks from warping. I finally have two that haven't moved. I laminated those two. If your like me and probably like a lot of the new guys that are on their first build. We don't have tons of wood laying around and places set up to store it. I'd recommend trying this. Its a mahogany center with some flamed maple on the outside. It was originally 1.5in thick and now is around 1in, I've been slowly cutting it down.
     

    Attached Files:


  12. Newbcaster

    Newbcaster Tele-Meister

    Age:
    43
    349
    May 10, 2015
    Gilbert
    move to arizona...keep your house at 72 all year round with ac...done
     
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  13. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2011
    Tucson
    While representing quite a commitment to the craft, this technique will definitely work...
     
    Newbcaster and Jackadder like this.

  14. GotTheSilver

    GotTheSilver TDPRI Member

    17
    Jan 4, 2015
    Houston, TX
    I'm facing a similar problem. I live in Houston, where the average annual humidity is 75% and temperatures regularly hit over 100 degrees in July and August. I just bought the wood for my first build, aside from the guitar building class I took at a local woodworking store a couple of months ago. My original plan was to store the wood in the non-air conditioned garage for a while to let it acclimate before I started cutting it, since the garage is where my workshop will be. Now I am wondering if I should do something different, like keep the wood in the air conditioned house. But then I might have problems when I do finally take it out to the garage and start cutting it. Any advice? And how long do I need to let the wood acclimate before I can start cutting it?
     

  15. Rich B in Tempe

    Rich B in Tempe Tele-Holic

    Age:
    64
    570
    Apr 20, 2016
    Tempe Arizona
    I live in Arizona! Great state to build guitars in!!
     
    Newbcaster likes this.

  16. Rich B in Tempe

    Rich B in Tempe Tele-Holic

    Age:
    64
    570
    Apr 20, 2016
    Tempe Arizona
    Keep the wood in the envirement in which you plan to build in .
     

  17. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Feb 29, 2004
    Portland, OR
    My shop is in the woods...
     

  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I would keep the wood in the house...work on it...and return it to the house. It'll end up in the house right? You can also build a storage cabinet. This can be "heated" by a light bulb held in a ceramic fixture to store your wood. Light bulbs put out heat. Warm air lowers humidity.

    Make sure it has holes in the top and bottom to allow air to move through it. Obviously you don't want it to start a fire.
     

  19. telepraise

    telepraise TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    29
    Feb 27, 2017
    Palmetto, Florida
    Maple takes such a beautiful glassy smooth finish that it makes a great neck, but it is not an inherently stable wood, which is why mahogany is the first-choice wood for acoustics. What a lot of luthiers do is shoot for quarter-sawn grain as much as possible. You can always take your blanks, split them, rotate 90 degrees and laminate something in down the middle (or go 5-ply like the old Johnny Smith necks). Not very tele-esque but definitely very stable. Getting guitar necks consistent under string tension is hard enough when the wood grain isn't trying to do something else on it's own.
     

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