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Housing Inspection Notice From Landlord

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by tele-rain, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    42
    Aug 28, 2018
    Pittsburgh
    I'd imagine the concerns are overblown. For every actual incident with an extension cord, there are probably thousands of tenants complaining about blown breakers and having no clue why (when it's their fault).

    If you ever rewire old switches, it's not that uncommon to find corrosion and evidence of arcing/black stuff. It's not particularly comforting to see that, but it's there.
     
  2. ebb soul

    ebb soul Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    59
    Jun 7, 2016
    Smyrna georgia
     
  3. Boomhauer

    Boomhauer Friend of Leo's

    Aug 18, 2013
    Michigan
    I work in building maintenance, in a hotel, which falls under the same regulations (as I understand them) as apartments and multi-family dwellings, so that's where my experience comes from. Basically, our fire marshal got us GOOD for having too many extension cords everywhere, powering things like computers, minifridges, even our outdoor patio lights. He didn't give a specific timeline, but if something's going to be plugged in long-term, it's defined as being "permanent," and in our case, necessitated getting an electrician in to hardwire the fixtures in question into place. Our patio lights had to be modified to use as few extension cords as possible; we had to assemble new cubicles with wiring built in for the computers; and we had to get rid of a few fridges and coolers because we couldn't find a satisfactory solution. Things like Christmas lights were exempt because those are typically only up for a month, but he cautioned us that those are a huge cause for electric fires.

    Regarding your lamps, and not knowing the exact verbiage of the NJ code (I'd guess it's far stricter than Michigan), I'd say move them to a place where they can be plugged directly into the outlet in the wall. Or, if that's absolutely not an option, buy a proper surge protector (costs $10 or $15, as opposed to a plain ol' power strip which costs $5 or so) that will offer overload protection, and that can be used to give yourself a few extra feet.

    I wouldn't sweat the aircon units if they're not in the windows.
     
  4. dented

    dented Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Apr 17, 2006
    Back at the Beach
    Here's my 2 sense....:rolleyes:

    1. Remove all extensions for the inspection and tidy up the cords and everything involving a surge protector.

    2. Do not expect for any reason that the landlord is adding outlets.
     
    omahaaudio likes this.
  5. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Jun 21, 2011
    Bakersfield
    If you've lived there five years and paid your rent on time, (or you wouldn't be there) the landlord ain't gonna kick you out if you hook an electrical cord to the inspector, and plug it in. (grounded or no) :lol::lol::lol:
     
  6. omahaaudio

    omahaaudio Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    63
    Mar 21, 2015
    Omaha
    In many cases they're not going to do an upgrade to grounded outlets if the building code when your apartment building was built didn't include that as a specification.
    As for the extensions, just take them out on inspection day.
     
  7. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

    Aug 1, 2008
    Bayonne, NJ
    POSSIBLE SOLUTION:

    What if I get myself a surge protector with a power cord long enough to reach the lamp? Or do those count as extension cords as well? I do have one pluged into the other outlet, but it would only reach the lamp if i let it sit on top of the couch. Obviously that is not safe. This one has a cord of about 5 ft. If I get one up to 11 feet, I would be able to plug it into the outlet, and let it go behind the couch to the other side and plug the lamp in there, as well as charge my phone, etc as needed. It's the same concept I guess, but is a surge protector better than an extension cord, or are they seen as basically the same threat as an extension cord?
     
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