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Housing Inspection Notice From Landlord

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by tele-rain, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. tery

    tery Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Sep 21, 2012
    Tennessee
    Ask the inspector for their recommendations . They are there in the interest of your safety . There may have been changes to the building code or an insurance requirement ?
     
  2. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

    Aug 1, 2008
    Bayonne, NJ
    The bathroom and kitchen seem to be the only onces that show up as grounded. Guess I'll have to set up my TV & laptop in there, LOL.

    I'm going to just leave it as is and see what happens. If they are violations, I will deal with moving the lamp to where the cord fits. The A/C will be trickier, but if need be, at least I have time to figure that out as we're just heading into winter.
     
  3. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

    Aug 1, 2008
    Bayonne, NJ
    Hmm I'm not sure, and I'm not going to be home the day of inspection. It's on a Friday at 11am. I can probably take off of work, but the landlord asks if you're not gonig to be home, they are able to use their key to get in. I've had that happen a few other times like when he had to fix a radiator, change the smoke detector/carbon monoxide. I'm fine with it, and one time he even thanked me for keeping an clean apartment :)
     
    tery likes this.
  4. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

    Aug 1, 2008
    Bayonne, NJ
    How do I know how many amps the outlet is?

    One thing I did learn and plan to correct is the length of the extension cord shouldn't be too long. It should be just as long enough to fit to the outlet. My A/C reaches just by barely a foot, so I'm going to get a heavy duty 1 or 2 foot cord to use next time. Something about the longer the cord, the more juice has to travel through it, which can potentially cause an issue.
     
  5. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

    Aug 1, 2008
    Bayonne, NJ
     
  6. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    42
    Aug 28, 2018
    Pittsburgh
    Right on the second part. The longer the cord, the higher the gauge needs to be to handle a similar load and not experience voltage drop (drop in voltage means an appliance or motor - as in the motor in an A/C will pull more amps to make up for the voltage drop - loosely described as a non-electrician). If you have a short cord and it's the right gauge, that's the best case.

    While the rules might be different, a short run from a panel and a short extension cord that's appropriately designed is better than a long run from a panel and no cord. The rules may not make judgments like that, though.

    Not to mention, a heavy gauge long extension cord is probably not something you could hide neatly in your apartment.

    I don't know what outlets were historically, and if they're a "lighting circuit" there's probably several outlets on the same one (ever have the experience of running a vacuum or something typical and tripping a breaker - it's usually because there's another outlet with something else on the same circuit). Typical circuits with 14 gauge wire are probably 15 amps, and 12 gauge wiring for 20 amp circuits.

    If the wiring in your building is old, things can get hot (due to poor connections) below the threshhold because a poor connection (like oxidized aluminum wiring or connections) or poorly designed switch can cause a voltage drop just like a too-small extension cord.

    Leave that stuff to the inspector. If a typical outlet that was designed for lighting and is two prong (let's say 60s or 70s) is a mandatory replacement, I would be surprised.

    Just thinking about this out loud from an uneducated person's viewpoint, there may be a device (that's not expensive) that gives you line voltage and wattage draw. As in, you plug the measuring device into the outlet, and then plug the item you're using into the device and see what it tells you.

    There's something called a kill-a-watt that will tell you how many watts are being used (useful to see what things are using power when you think they're not, or how much power a piggish TV or something might use), but I have never looked at mine to see if it tells you wattage.

    Inspector aside (and more an issue of your safety and doing save things), if you aren't seeing a significant voltage drop with a device like that, and the amount of current (amps, watts, whatever) being drawn isn't excessive, then there shouldn't be any safety issue that's within your control.
     
  7. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    42
    Aug 28, 2018
    Pittsburgh
    That's a good thing. They're probably the most likely places where grounding will keep you safe (because you can end up being in line with electricity going to ground - which can make you deceased quickly. As in, a surge of electricity going through the outlet, through you, through water, into plumbing fixtures while it finds the easiest path to the ground).

    Lighting circuits, less likely since there's nothing connecting you to the ground when you're sitting on a couch using your computer.
     
  8. Recce

    Recce Tele-Afflicted

    May 3, 2016
    Northern Alabama
    In eighth or ninth grade I was taking electrical shop. Being the dumb kid that I was about electricity I got to wondering what would happen if you stuck a wire in both sides of an outlet and touched the wires together. Answer: A fireball shoots at your face, the class goes dark and the teacher decides if you are kicked out of class or just didn't know any better. He decided i just didn't know any better and I was told in no uncertain terms not to do it again. It also lowers your citizenship score for the quarter. Can you imagine.

    By the way, no, I don't build amps.
     
  9. ebb soul

    ebb soul Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    58
    Jun 7, 2016
    Smyrna georgia
    Hopefully yer inspector has been bought, otherwise you may well have to move out.
    All wiring must have not only grounds now, but said grounds must be crimped.
     
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  10. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

    Aug 1, 2008
    Bayonne, NJ
    Haha!! I was an equally curious young girl. Playing that old school Operation game, which at the time in the 70s came with metal tweezers, I decided to place said tweezers into the socket. I don't remmeber much else but I know my Mom knew what I did 3 rooms over and my sisters and I still laugh at it today, thankfully of course that we are able to laugh at it.
     
  11. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    42
    Aug 28, 2018
    Pittsburgh
    Neither do I (on the amps). I know enough to know that in old TVs and amps, there are things still holding enough current to turn you off permanently. I don't know how long a capacitor can hold a charge, but I also don't want to wake up in a hospital with a "would you believe that ____" kind of story.

    In high school physics, we had granite lab tables (not like flashy kitchen, the plain black granite that you find in a chem lab) that had an outlet in the center. You would think people in AP physics would know about electricity. A guy sitting next to me who said he was going to go to school for electrical engineering said "I wonder what would happen if I put a paperclip in the outlet". I told him my bobby pin story ("it almost killed me, left a burn on my hand and melted into the carpet"). He said "there's no way all of society would allow us to have something that unsafe. If I put the paperclip in the outlet, nothing will happen. If it was that unsafe, it would be illegal."

    I was dumbfounded. I said "don't do it". I'm always sarcastic, so he thought I was just pulling his leg with scary stories.

    He carefully folded a paperclip into a three prong shape and I moved my chair away from him so as not to catch current off of him and said "don't do it!!".

    He stuck the paper clip in, big pop (like you remember) and the paper clip shot across the room (anyone here in physics? I'd guess that was an air temperature related thing - like a sonic boom from the instant heating from the electric arc). He went back and picked it up and the ends of the paperclip had been instantly heated and formed into little metal balls. Black.

    He took no damage from it (very lucky) and stared at me like it was somehow my fault.

    Fortunately, we had a senior-aged instructor who was really out of it, she turned her head around to look, and then went right back to "teaching." (that guy isn't an electrical engineer now).

    (the teacher was so senile that the whole year, the QB - who went on to be a starter at Clemson - put a laser pointer dot next to her on the board, about three feet away from where she was writing. She never noticed it. Only turned around once in a while to see why the students were laughing. That QB is now the QB coach at Clemson - he's a genuinely good guy - that was probably the only impolite thing he's ever done).

    At any rate, that level of senility and a little luck allowed my table mate to travel up a pretty steep learning curve without getting hurt or getting in trouble.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018
    tele-rain likes this.
  12. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

    Aug 1, 2008
    Bayonne, NJ
    Wow, high school age should definitely know better! My Operation game tweezer mishap was when I was like 6 or so.
     
  13. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

    Aug 1, 2008
    Bayonne, NJ
    Crimped as in that godawful 80s hair style?

    892275B1-7E46-4DC0-95D0-83A4D5B6A08F-2315-000002F0733A65B0.jpeg
     
    tery likes this.
  14. fendrguitplayr

    fendrguitplayr Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    67
    Oct 11, 2006
    Greater Boston
    I'd ask your landlord what he meant.
     
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  15. stevemc

    stevemc TDPRI Member

    Age:
    62
    85
    Mar 7, 2018
    cape cod
    ask the landlord or building super.if you have one.if it were me and i was'nt sure i'd just put the a/c's and extension cords away.if i had to move things around so lamp would be handy without an extension etc.you can put things back together after inspection.if the fire dept has been through and ok'd everything probably nothing to worry about.unless there has beena code update.good luck!
     
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  16. schmee

    schmee Friend of Leo's

    Jun 2, 2003
    northwest
    This stuff is almost always insurance rating based. If most everything is good, he pays lower insurance. If everything is bad he pays much higher insurance.
     
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  17. beninma

    beninma Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Age:
    41
    Mar 17, 2017
    Massachusetts
    On a practical basis just how dangerous are extension cords?

    The only thing we really use them for other than temporary use of a power tool is Holiday outside lights.

    Doing a google search it sounds like most of the incidents are just people tripping over the cords and getting injured. Something like 50 people a year get hurt from fires related to them, in a country of 300+ million people.

    The warnings sound more like overly careful "People are really dumb" guidelines. Stuff like not breaking the ground prong off the cord to use it in an ungrounded outlet.

    60w lightbulb is 0.5A right? Who has 60w bulbs anymore most of the ones in my house are more like 5-10w I think, so more like < 100mA?

    Is the OPs use of one with a lamp really any real concern? I know there are some real janky/cheap cords but most of the ones I have look like they're as heavy a gauge as what's in the wall.
     
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  18. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    62
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    I wouldn't get too worried.
     
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  19. soulgeezer

    soulgeezer Poster Extraordinaire

    Nov 5, 2006
    Sinatra's World
    I live in NJ and have to deal with fire inspectors in my public library and in the multi-unit condo where I live...

    Extension cords cannot be used as permanent solutions. If necessary, additional outlets must be installed.

    My approach has always been this: Fire marshals are going to find something every time. It's their job. If they don't find anything, then it looks like the're not doing their job. So, they're going to find something every single time.

    Therefore, just let them do the inspection and they'll tell you what needs to be done and they'll cite the code that has been violated. Then, they'll give you (or the landlord, depending on the circumstance) thirty days to remediate any issues and be re-inspected.

    The easiest thing to do is 1) don't worry about it, and 2) let them tell you what needs to be done.

    If you remove the cords, then they'll just find something else. You can't win, so don't even try. Seriously, don't. You'll just frustrate yourself unnecessarily.
     
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  20. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    62
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL


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