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Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by vinceg, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. bender66

    bender66 Friend of Leo's

    Jan 18, 2010
    on my bike
    That's what I thought. You were making me second guess what i was looking at.
     

  2. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    I agree, polyurethane is a different monster, very little thinner is needed, where with Lacquer you can thin it well over 50% depending on your application and conditions.
    I take it you are using an oil based tint? or an additive to make it work with the polyurethane? If you only have access to oil based products you can make it look really nice but as the other have pointed out, could be difficult to hide altogether unless you are doing a solid color.
    Too bad you didn't have access to some shellac. denatured alcohol and fabric dye. You could make a toner of sorts and then coat with the clear polyurethane.
     
    vinceg and eallen like this.

  3. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    I realize there may be language issues here and there, but I think it's very important to avoid the use of the word "paint" here altogether, unless you're talking about water or oil based wall & trim "paint".

    If talking about lacquer, say "lacquer". If polyurethane, "polyurethane" and so on.

    The generic term "coating" can be virtually anything, but in finishing circles "paint" implies wall & trim paint - NOT the type of coating normally used on a guitar.

    As far as "toners" go, pigment mixed with lacquers is indeed a lacquer toner, and that's exactly what he was talking about in the original post. I know for a fact (al;thogh I do not recall brand names) that lacquer toners are available in Italy, which was why I mentioned them.

    If the OP is not aware of sources I have a question for him -

    What systems did you use, and how did you mix your dye? Because by mixing dye you were making your own "toner". You may not have done it in lacquer but it's similar. Regardless of what you do, of you try to "shade" something for touchup purposes you will want to do a lot of experimenting and test applications before applying anything to the piece itself.

    All of this is partially why I suggested living with it. It's a difficult, unlikely "fix" even for the best finishers.
     
    vinceg likes this.

  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    I think you mean they produce tints, colorants and/or dyes intended for use in lacquers or polyurethanes

    The aerosol toners discussed are finished products - semi transparent lacquers with shading tints or dyes added. They are not added to other lacquers or to polyurethanes. Those are tints, colorants and dyes sold in concentrated form.
     

  5. Finck

    Finck Tele-Holic

    Age:
    52
    763
    Oct 11, 2017
    São Paulo - Brazil
    Thanks! I didn't know those particularities!
     

  6. Finck

    Finck Tele-Holic

    Age:
    52
    763
    Oct 11, 2017
    São Paulo - Brazil
    Yes, I was referring to specific products (let's call them "colorants") that need to be added to clear lacquer or polyurethane which will be applied with an airbrush or gun. I have got good results using a mix of clear lacquer (nitrocellulose) and, as example, a bit of brown lacquer instead of that colorants.

    I understood that what you call "toner" is something like a "clear coat" which is not totally clear, but has a certain shade of color. Is that right?
     

  7. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Friend of Leo's

    Sep 15, 2007
    Glen Head, NY
    Seems like you repaired it so expertly that you will have nothing to worry about. When it's sealed and you have the grain filler on there, and then a coat of clear, you'll know what you're dealing with. I doubt it will be that noticeable. Before grain-filling, you could try the trick of using a hobby knife to add some fake open-pore grain lines just across the color change; that way it will look like one continuous piece of the same wood.
     
    vinceg and eallen like this.

  8. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Correct. Either packaged products or mixed for the specific project.
     

  9. vinceg

    vinceg Tele-Meister

    138
    Feb 9, 2010
    italy
    I completely agree with you. I understand that when you speak of lacquer you are referring to nitro product. I do not use nitro, I use polyurethane and liquid dye that can mix on clear polyurethane finish.
     

  10. vinceg

    vinceg Tele-Meister

    138
    Feb 9, 2010
    italy
    This is a nice idea. Unfortunately i have already grain filling and spray base coat
     

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