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Help with Pine Body

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by CletusVanDamme, Aug 5, 2018.

  1. CletusVanDamme

    CletusVanDamme TDPRI Member

    Age:
    18
    17
    Jun 28, 2018
    Ma
    I bought a Pine Telecaster body on ebay. It needed some work so it ended up being about 17.00. The first thing is the neck pocket. There is some chipping on one side and the other side the pocket looks like it was cut too short. The second is the holes were drilled unevenly where the strings/ string ferrules go.

    1. Is the neck pocket okay and how do I fix the chipping?

    2. What should I do with the uneven holes? Should I fill in the ferrule holes with wood filler and put a top loading bridge in?
     

    Attached Files:


  2. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

    Sep 14, 2005
    Nueces Strip
    If you're going for a solid color or dark colored burst I think I would just use wood filler to fix the neck pocket.
    The string-thru holes being uneven does have some historic credibility, since many of the early Teles were this way.
    However, if you're hoping to end up with a pristine example of perfection then this probably isn't the body to do it with.
    Good luck to ya.
     

  3. Seasicksailor

    Seasicksailor Tele-Afflicted

    Jun 26, 2012
    Bristol UK
    That's lovely grain. It'd be a shame to go with a solid colour.
    The ferules wouldn't bother me. I have no idea what to do with the rest.

    Enjoy the process!
     

  4. CletusVanDamme

    CletusVanDamme TDPRI Member

    Age:
    18
    17
    Jun 28, 2018
    Ma
    This is the first time I have tried something like this. I would be happy with a functional guitar.


    Is it okay the groove in neck pocket opposite the horn was cut too short? Would you use wood filler to extend it?
     
    Lake Placid Blue likes this.

  5. CletusVanDamme

    CletusVanDamme TDPRI Member

    Age:
    18
    17
    Jun 28, 2018
    Ma
    I bought it because it was cheap and I wouldn't be upset if I messed something up but the gain does look good. I was thinking of attempting a steel wool and vinegar finish.

    I thought the holes being drilled unevenly might have ruined it.
     
    Seasicksailor likes this.

  6. Hobs

    Hobs Tele-Meister

    106
    Sep 16, 2011
    Nashville, TN
    The uneven holes would be hard to fix, but aren't a functional problem.

    You could use wood filler on that uneven edge of the neck pocket tongue, but forget using filler to rebuild those thin vertical edges of the pocket. It just isn't strong enough. Just carefully trim them back even with a sharp knife or chisel, sand, and call it done. It should make a fine guitar.
     
    RodeoTex likes this.

  7. RolandG

    RolandG TDPRI Member

    64
    Jul 31, 2015
    UK
    That depends on whether you prefer string-through or top-loaded strings. Personally I like string-through, but don’t like ferrules. So I’d route out a slot in the back of the guitar, and make a bar to retain the strings.
    [​IMG]
     

  8. CletusVanDamme

    CletusVanDamme TDPRI Member

    Age:
    18
    17
    Jun 28, 2018
    Ma
    Why don't you like ferrules?
     

  9. CletusVanDamme

    CletusVanDamme TDPRI Member

    Age:
    18
    17
    Jun 28, 2018
    Ma
    Is it necessary or just cosmetic?
     

  10. bender66

    bender66 Friend of Leo's

    Jan 18, 2010
    on my bike

  11. Hobs

    Hobs Tele-Meister

    106
    Sep 16, 2011
    Nashville, TN
    Just cosmetic.
     

  12. RolandG

    RolandG TDPRI Member

    64
    Jul 31, 2015
    UK
    I think that they are a poor solution. Mechanically they don’t spread the load as well as a bar, particularly when the body is made from soft wood. They require an unnecessary level of precision during manufacture, particularly to get them in a neat line. From a user’s perspective there is a risk that a ferrule will fall out and roll away when changing a string. Imagine that on a dark stage.
     

  13. CletusVanDamme

    CletusVanDamme TDPRI Member

    Age:
    18
    17
    Jun 28, 2018
    Ma
    Is is possible to use a bar on this body or would I have to stick with ferrules because they are already drilled?
     

  14. CletusVanDamme

    CletusVanDamme TDPRI Member

    Age:
    18
    17
    Jun 28, 2018
    Ma

  15. harold h

    harold h Friend of Leo's

    Feb 15, 2004


    That doesnt bode well for him.

    It appears he doesnt use a CNC machine, or those would not be so
    messed up.

    But I would leave it as is, the crooked holes will still look much better
    than wood filler.

    I think he is the bgy I bought a body off of years ago, and it took him
    forever to ship it.
     

  16. bender66

    bender66 Friend of Leo's

    Jan 18, 2010
    on my bike
    Crooked ferrules are such a non issue to me. Take a look at the Blackguard book or the Duchossier Telecaster book & see that perfection came later Cletus. I like imperfections myself, to an extent. Buttcrack too.
     

  17. viking

    viking Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    52
    Jan 23, 2007
    Denmark
    Very sloppy work , and there is hardly anything that looks like normal on the shape of this body.
    If you want to use this body , do it to learn about finishing , and assemble a guitar , adjust and setup.
    I would NOT buy cheap parts for the rest of the build , get a decent neck , pickups , pots and bridge.
    When you have it all together , you can always transfer the parts to a new body and have a great , good looking , guitar to enjoy
    If you use similar cheap parts for the rest , you will end up with a pos that rests in a corner , and the money plus work is wasted , apart from what you learned along the way....
     

  18. Festus_Hagen

    Festus_Hagen Tele-Meister

    Age:
    52
    187
    Jul 6, 2016
    Jeff City, Mo.
    While there are some imperfections obviously, you got it cheap enough you could do a little work and it will still be a great player probably.

    The string ferrules ... as was said by bender, the old Fenders weren't very neat in their appearance from one to the next. I've seen a few originals that looked like that. Don't worry about it.

    I would just sand the neck pocket from the inside out with a flat piece of wood w/ sandpaper on it until the neck fit, then trim/ sand that spot.

    I got a body awhile back that was like that. It looks squared off now, but it wouldn't make it not play good.
    It's too damn heavy to be a guitar though ..... :rolleyes:
     

  19. jrblue

    jrblue Tele-Meister

    387
    Nov 14, 2010
    Santa Barbara
    Yeesh, that's lousy workmanship. You can make anything into a functional, bolt-on guitar, so the question is what do you, yourself, want? Hacked up non-tonewood bodies have become a "thing," so if you're OK with that, as long as you can bolt the neck securely and string length and alignment are OK, you don't "need" to fix or fill anything. Of course, if you want a finely executed guitar with really well-fit parts and components, well, a knotted softwood body apparently chewed out by beavers with dentures would not be the way to begin. While I would not myself invest time in making something fundamentally clunky, there are lots of players who find inspiration in "anti-fussy" guitars, and I don't think you will find it hard to make that body work. The neck's way more important anyway. But I would be worried about neck alignment and scale length, since work that is badly sloppy in some respects may prove to be "off" in other, critical ways. Good luck! The important thing is that you enjoy the work and the result.
     

  20. dkmw

    dkmw Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    63
    Mar 30, 2016
    Florida USA
    Hi Cletus, welcome to the forum. We need more youth here and you can learn a lot about building partscasters.

    The neck pocket stuff can be ''fixed'', but the bigger problem I see with string-through are the misaligned holes on the bridge side. They're not going to line up with the holes in your bridge. You'll have to fix that (you could use your bridge as a template and drill until you find the path to ferrule:eek:). Or just put a toploader bridge.

    Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but those holes don't look right....
     

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