Help me choose how to cut this log.

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Bugeater281, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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  2. Bugeater281

    Bugeater281 Tele-Meister

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    Oh man. Did you fall down one of our potholes?
     
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  3. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Weigh it before you make a body. 2.2 lbs/bdft or less makes for an acceptably light weight body. More than that and you might find you'd prefer to make a thinline out of it.
     
  4. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity

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    Nice lumber pile!
    My inclination would be to get some widest possible slabs not QS, and also some QS cuts, with OCD choosing which cuts to make.

    You said you plan on 2" thick slabs, I'd want to go a little thicker as trying to remove 1/8" from each side of a chainsaw cut slab might not work out so well.
     
  5. esbrian

    esbrian TDPRI Member

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    Ash (at least the ash that grows around here) splits SO straight and easy that I would be riving/splitting some of that for sure. Any straight section that doesn't have a large branch or crotch could be split into useful slabs in minutes with some very basic tools.
     
  6. tele_savales

    tele_savales Tele-Meister

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    Yup she's a biggun. I was doing tree work with a one-man owned company who used to bid on large removals specifically so he could mill the wood and we used a frame about that sized with beefy Husquavarna's on each end on this mega huge Torrey Pine that we dropped. I have no idea how we even hand stacked those slabs. In retrospect, it may have been a contributing factor in my spinal fusion surgery years later.
     
  7. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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    Nice!

    Fifteen years ago, those slabs were kind of uncommon around here, but so was properly sawn lumber if you wanted specialty sawing (truly good quartersawing that had no runout anywhere, etc).

    Now, we have a lot of slabs around here and people getting mills as a hobby and sawing logs through and through. I think it's killed the market some.

    I haven't done too much looking because I don't have any large power saws, and the slabs are hard to move, but it seems common that the slabs get improperly dried, are low grade to start with, or are allowed to rot before people will come down in price.

    I'd like to saw a log by hand at some point, but not like that one. Something green and less than 2 feet in diameter.
     
  8. omahaaudio

    omahaaudio Tele-Afflicted

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    Nope. Just retired and followed a life-long dream.
    I do not miss the Omaha weather.
     
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  9. Bugeater281

    Bugeater281 Tele-Meister

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    This will be cut by a bandsaw mill. I was going with 2inch due to the slabs becoming close to 1.75in after drying. Which is perfect for a body, then I don’t have to take off tons a material to get to 1.5in bodies so I can top them. And then that also leaves me the ability to resaw qt sawn pierced into two separate necks. And I think 1.5-1.75 in thicknwould be fine for a table.
     
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