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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Great forum idea!

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by stevieboy, Mar 17, 2003.

  1. stevieboy

    stevieboy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    66
    Mar 16, 2003
    the valley
    I've wished in the past for a page on the TDPRI about home recording, which I've been pursuing for a little while now. Hopefully a lot of us will jump in and post questions, observations, links, etc.

    I started out with one of the Tascam Pocketstudio 5's. They had a lot of problems at first but seem to have those ironed out--fortunately they were correctable with software updates. But I never used the backing track function, and I felt really limited by just four tracks--and I haven't even gotten into vocals. Mainly I want to lay down guitar tracks, and I want to do and store a lot of different takes, difficult to do with four tracks. But I learned alot while using it.

    So now I have a Boss BR-1180, and am learning how to use it. I use a Boss 670 for drum and bass tracks, do some of the bass myself.

    Who else records at home?
     

  2. Revrund

    Revrund TDPRI Member

    9
    Mar 17, 2003
    Iowa
    Home Recording

    I'm with you Stevieboy, do quite a bit of recording at the homestead, currently shopping for a new digital multitrack as I have pretty much exhausted the possibilities of my old Zoom PS-02 (and am getting really tired of the constant LED menu jumping). Also, looking for something to get a bit more professionally sounding work out of. The PS-02 is nice but it's old and there are lots of new options out there. I personally don't care for PC-based recording.
     

  3. ColsTele

    ColsTele TDPRI Member

    6
    Mar 17, 2003
    cols. Oh
    I record at home using n-track software on the PC. I have my inputs (mics, direct) go into an 8 channel mixing board then into the sound card. I do all of the overdubs myself. I don't use anything for drums. Drums were taking me a lot more time than I wanted. For some rythym sounds, I now use shaker or tamborine.
     

  4. markophonic

    markophonic Tele-Afflicted

    Mar 17, 2003
    Michigan
    Glad to see a Home recording room here at the TDPRI!

    I have a Roland VS840EX 8trk digital standalone and a Fostex MR-8 8trk digital unit.

    a MXL 990 and MXL v57m large diaphram condenser mics.

    various shure SM57's and 58's and a vintage 55S and several small condensers. an old astatic mic for harmonica stuff.

    an ART tube MP studio mic preamp

    an alesis sr-16 drum machine and lots of sticks and rocks to bang together

    a Yamaha DG stomp guitar pre-amp with some nice amp and cabinet simulators. and many effects reverbs etc.

    various compressors....lots of stuff comes and goes....

    I like to fiddle around at home....
     

  5. stevieboy

    stevieboy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    66
    Mar 16, 2003
    the valley
    Sticks and rocks

    I'd like to see that stick and rock collection.

    I've just started thinking about putting one together myself. I really like using the drum machine, but I want to add some "analog" percussion to add an element of human spontaneity to the rhythm track, i.e. do a basic drum pattern, but then add fills by hand instead of programming them. I can add simple stuff, like crashes, using the drum machine in real time, but can't do more intricate rhythms with those tiny pads.

    Or do some tunes completely by hand.

    I'll guess I'll just get a pair of sticks and start beating on whatever's around the house. My wife and her cats are gonna love it!
     

  6. cmcneil

    cmcneil TDPRI Member

    18
    Mar 16, 2003
    Pittsburgh, PA USA
    Re: Sticks and rocks

    I read an interview with Nick Lowe a long time ago where he said the greatest snare sound he had ever recorded was the sound of a pack of cigs being slapped against a paperback book cover... I say get the sticks and go for it 8)
     

  7. stevieboy

    stevieboy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    66
    Mar 16, 2003
    the valley
    stevieboy

    You mean I have to take up smoking? That's payin' some dues!
     

  8. Revrund

    Revrund TDPRI Member

    9
    Mar 17, 2003
    Iowa
    Hey Markophonic

    How do you like the 840EX, I've been looking at those, the Roland 880, the Boss BR-8, Zoom MRS-1044 and Akai DPS 12. My trouble is not having options, it's making up my mind :D Sometimes I wish there were only one 8-10 track digital recorder out there so I wouldn't have to mess with it. Thanks for the input.
     

  9. halouis

    halouis Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Mar 2, 2003
    Virginia
    Yeah I do, but not full production style. just for demos and idea collection.

    I use a Boss BR-8 and love it. Its so dang easy to use. had great built in features. I also use a Zoom 123 drum machine. which can be sync'd via Midi to the BR-8 rhythm guide. nice feature.

    also have a tech21 trademark 10 amp which can be direct outed into the BR8 for different tones.

    a shure sm57 and E/V mics.

    I'd like to get a decent condenser mic for live micing, but I rarely use my recorder for live recoirding at the moment.

    I record direct almost 100% the time.

    I am not a producer and dont desire to be one. I feel using this setup for simple demos and capturing late night ideas is what I like. then I present ot the band. Maybe I will try to useit to record the band one day for a basic demo. But for a proper Recording, I'd still rather go to a proper studio and spend a couple bucks to get it right.

    Lastly, I feel that there are some terrific products out there these days that let people do some remarkably good quality for not too much money. Stuff that can produce real professional results if the user has the drive to pursue it. I have heard demos from folks using sub $5K entire systems that sound close to $1 million studio quality. oF course good mastering is essential.
     

  10. Revrund

    Revrund TDPRI Member

    9
    Mar 17, 2003
    Iowa
    Thanks Halouis

    Info. is much appreciated.
     

  11. markophonic

    markophonic Tele-Afflicted

    Mar 17, 2003
    Michigan
    I do like the 840EX and it can put out some really nice professional sounding recordings. It's not really complicated to use but there is a learning curve and if I don't use it often I have to refer to the manual quite alot. Its the reason i picked up the Fostex MR8.

    The MR8 is VERY EASY to operate. no where near the "bells and whistles" of the 840ex but makes some great sounding recordings. its best for fast 1 or 2 take things. great for songwriting ideas etc. you can also plug into your computer via USB and upload wav files to convert to mp3 and burn etc. also to use in conjunction with N-Tracks as an editor....you can upload unlimited tracks to use in this fashion...24 trks whatever!!! very nice feature...but it doesn't have the onboard eq or effects etc.
     

  12. Revrund

    Revrund TDPRI Member

    9
    Mar 17, 2003
    Iowa
    Markophonic

    Gracias, as chance would have it I just picked up an MR-8 yesterday for cheap ($160.00). Wasn't really looking at that model too much as I wanted to get into better quality but for that price couldn't pass it up. Still looking for another one but the MR-8 should be fun.
     

  13. markophonic

    markophonic Tele-Afflicted

    Mar 17, 2003
    Michigan
    Revrund,

    Go to: http://www.homerecording.com

    and go to the BBS/forum and click on the "Fostex" forum.

    Lots of MR8 users and lots of info on how to get the most out of the unit!!!

    Happy Recording!!

    (((mark-o-phonic)))
     

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