Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups darrenriley.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

got a little crazy at Radio Shack this morning

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by 66Satellite, May 15, 2013.

  1. 66Satellite

    66Satellite Tele-Holic

    774
    Aug 1, 2010
    Seattle
    Walked in and dropped $66 on this stuff

    [​IMG]

    after watching this video



    here's my cheap Tele I'm gonna learn and experiment on

    [​IMG]

    Any tips before I have at it?
     

  2. waparker4

    waparker4 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Nov 9, 2011
    Philadelphia, PA
    scraping the big metal parts (backs of pots, strat trem claws) with sandpaper before soldering helps
     

  3. src9000

    src9000 Poster Extraordinaire


  4. Tonemonkey

    Tonemonkey Poster Extraordinaire

    Did a quick inventory check; You don't seem to have a neck .... Your guitar, that is!
     

  5. 66Satellite

    66Satellite Tele-Holic

    774
    Aug 1, 2010
    Seattle
    yeah, I pulled the whole thing apart. Had never done that before. Kind of fun. :D Figured I should take it all the way apart and put it back together once or twice before attempting my first partscaster with nicer parts
     

  6. 66Satellite

    66Satellite Tele-Holic

    774
    Aug 1, 2010
    Seattle
    What grade sandpaper?
     

  7. mojoatomic

    mojoatomic Tele-Holic

    688
    Dec 28, 2011
    Horn Lake, MS
    Get a small tin of flux and a wet sponge for cleaning the iron tip. Remember to tin the tip before you use it each time. Return the desoldering braid and pick up a solder sucker instead (my personal preferance, the braid tends to damage delicate parts and traces). You've purchased a transformerless iron, which is fine and they have their place - just remember your heat up times between solder joints won't be immediate.

    Let the joint melt the solder, and always tin wires and parts before you try to solder them (some are pre tinned).

    Good joints are shiny, poor ones are dull. Less is more, fat joints break and crack.

    Also, find a way to vent the fumes away from you. I soldered professionally for 20 years (still do sometimes, professionally that is) and have had several friends in the industry who would still be around if they hadn't breathed the lead fumes for so long.
     

  8. Hiker

    Hiker Friend of Leo's

    Jul 20, 2008
    Alabama
    Just a teeny, tiny suggestion. Treat every guitar with TLC. Start by placing something (like cotton cloth or t-shirt) under the hardware to prevent scratches from 'getting' the body. It's best to practice 'pro' techniques, and don't start any bad habits. :D
     

  9. 66Satellite

    66Satellite Tele-Holic

    774
    Aug 1, 2010
    Seattle
    It's silver solder. Should I get a mask or something. Or fan blowing behind me?
     

  10. 66Satellite

    66Satellite Tele-Holic

    774
    Aug 1, 2010
    Seattle
    Good idea!
     

  11. mojoatomic

    mojoatomic Tele-Holic

    688
    Dec 28, 2011
    Horn Lake, MS

    Silver solder is good for jewelery, but not for soldering electronics; need to get some 60/40 (tin /lead) solder for guitar work. Silver bearing solder will require a much higher watt iron.

    I like the fume extractors that sit in front of you. You can even use a fan in front of you facing the other direction to pull the fumes.
     

  12. 66Satellite

    66Satellite Tele-Holic

    774
    Aug 1, 2010
    Seattle
    The guy in the video claims silver is better (around the 4:00 mark).

    I'll look into some fume options before I dive in.

    Thanks!
     

  13. mojoatomic

    mojoatomic Tele-Holic

    688
    Dec 28, 2011
    Horn Lake, MS

    Everyone has the stuff they like, YMMV
     

  14. waparker4

    waparker4 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Nov 9, 2011
    Philadelphia, PA

  15. OpenG Capo4

    OpenG Capo4 Friend of Leo's

    Aug 4, 2010
    Athens, GA
    I've had much better luck with 60/40 than silver.
     

  16. Onebean

    Onebean Tele-Holic

    642
    Nov 10, 2012
    Nebraska
    Stay away from silver. The first stereo preamp I built, I used 4% silver solder. I had to go back and reflow every joint with 60/40. Silver has to high of a melting point, and doesn't flow very good.

    Onebean
     

  17. 66Satellite

    66Satellite Tele-Holic

    774
    Aug 1, 2010
    Seattle
    Ok, will definitely revisit the solder
     

  18. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    71
    May 1, 2003
    Jacksonville, FL
    couple of tips..

    The number one mistake made by many when using a soldering pencil/gun is using one that is too low a wattage... the one you have will not heat the trem claw adequately.... and it will barely do the pot... but you will have to be careful... if you have a heat gun, you can use it to supplement the soldering pencil on the claw, but not the pot... If the claw isn’t hot enough to make the solder melt/flow, you will not have a good joint.

    Practice on something else first... any old electronic gizmo will have solder points inside... a hammer is a good way to open it... :eek:

    Using too low a wattage on the pots can result in you leaving the tool in position too long, in an effort to get the solder to flow. This allows the pot’s case to get hot enough to melt the plastic parts inside, resulting in total failure. :(

    Be sure the tool is fully hot before beginning... if using a gun, allow it to come to temperature before applying it to the work..

    If there’s junk on the tip, don’t lick it.... it tastes as bad as taking a hit off a cigar... backwards... pay attention... do not ask me how I know... ;)

    You want something generating enough heat to instantly heat the area of the solder joint adequately before the heat can dissipate throughout the whole piece... It should take 2 - 4 seconds to complete the typical solder joint.

    Better pots. i.e. CTS, and better trem claws, Fender OEM, Gotoh, Wilkinson, to name a few will not need to be scraped... the guys that made ‘em know how they have to be soldered.. Nickel plated parts can be soldered, chrome not... raw steel is more difficult to solder, brass and copper, or brass and copper plated metal is very easy...aluminum, Stainless Steel, Titanium and most exotic metals found in overpriced junk cannot be soldered by the novice or me either...

    Those having trouble with 4% silver solder are doing something wrong... it’s no more difficult to use than 60/40.

    Silver solder used in Jewelry is a completely different product, more inline with braze welding, requiring considerably more heat than a soldering gun or pencil can ever supply. It usually requires a miniature blow-torch. There are some "amateur grade" Jewelry silver solders that can be melted with a conventional solder tool but you don't wanna mention it to a real jeweler... and you certainly do not want to use it in electronic applications..

    Have fun.. and do not let the hot solder drip onto your sock.... and you thought you couldn’t dance... Oh.. don’t let it drip on the guitar’s finish either . . while you may not “dance” you will invent new profanity... :twisted:

    ron Kirn
     

  19. jpbturbo

    jpbturbo Tele-Afflicted

    Dec 30, 2010
    Banner Elk, NC
    I was soldering in shorts one time and dropped some molten solder on my thigh.
    I instantly wove a tapestry of expletives.
     

  20. Rich Rice

    Rich Rice Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 15, 2005
    Chicago 'Burbs
    Look for rosin core solder that's designed for electronics. Lots of different solders exist.
     

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.