Genre Vs. Era: 'Creep' by Radiohead: Classic Rock or no?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by StrangerNY, May 24, 2019.

  1. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Friend of Leo's

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    That's a great movie and soundtrack. I agree.
     
  2. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I hear some of the same tunes on both Classic Rock and Alt Rock radio.

    I think there is some Classic Rock that nobody really wants to hear any more, so it gets dropped from rotation.
    Gotta fill in those spaces with something, and indeed the music from the youth of the balding listener of today can be considered classic.

    From my age perspective I would have a hard time calling Creep classic rock, yet it sure as hell isn't new.

    Maybe when a style is no longer used by youth, that style is then classic.

    I mean I hear GVF on alt Rock radio, which really really annoys me.
    I listen to alt rock as an alternative to classic Rock.
    Don't give me that revivalist rock crap!
     
  3. Whatizitman

    Whatizitman Tele-Afflicted

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    The great irony being, of course, that the styles and categories that have come to be lumped under the term alt-rock have been the vessels for all revivalist rock since the late 70s.

    Stray Cats, The Cult, Smithereens, and zillions of others were college and ‘modern rock” (now called alternative) station mainstays. The first stations to embrace (read: market) Soundgarden, Pearl Jam, etc... were alternative rock stations. None of them had a distinctly ‘modern’ sound. Actual ‘modern’ rock at the time sounded like Slaughter. The first time I heard Man in the Box was on KROQ, not KLOS or KNAC.

    I think Rock’s been dead for decades now. It’s all been done in the name of rock. GFV probably would have had an audience in the early 90s, and it would have been marketed alternative just like it is now. Candlebox?

    I grew up for the on both alternative and classic rock. I think both terms are utterly meaningless at this point. But I don’t write the marketing rules.
     
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  4. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    WRT "the marketing rules" I was kinda market ruled out of existence because I'm not from any clearly marketed style.

    In Boston there was Green Street with experimental stuff and The Middle East where Sonic Youth played before they got big.
    In NYC there was the Knitting Factory and later other places. CBGBs was pretty mainstream in terms of dancing drinking music.

    No offense to dancing and drinking, but the players I jived with had similar issues with venues and genre definition.
    Eventually art galleries hosted live music, but I didn't find much in the "between the cracks" area that was really hard core music making.
    I listen to more Jazz but am not at all a Jazz player.
    Oddly my summer neighbor across the street referred to the live music coming out of my house as Jazz.
    I can play Rock just fine but need to go off into more risky improvisation, where Rock seldom survives.
    Jam bands aren't it either.

    Oh well I had a bunch of good years with a stream of musicians in and out of my home rehearsal space kicking out their jams when they wanted some musical freedom.

    Rock I'm not even sure I can identify, but I guess it's expanded to accept a pretty vast range.
    Got distorted guitar, trap drums, bass and a singer, not country; call it rock and charge for entry.
    Clueless.
     
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