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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Fixing Nail Pops in Drywall

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Bones, Nov 9, 2017.

  1. BRoberts

    BRoberts TDPRI Member

    77
    May 7, 2003
    Naples, Florida
    A small ball-peen hammer makes a perfect nail "re" set for these exposed nail heads. Then just mud over 'em...
     

  2. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    As I have said before, once the "rock" is crumbled between the layers of paper, there will always be a visible "pop" there. The wood is dried out, the nail is loose in the hole and the rock is damaged. Simply applying more mud may hide it for a while, but it will come back. This house experienced that "fix" every time that it was painted over the last 35 years, probably 5-6 times based on what i can tell. You don't need a stud finder because all you have to do is shine a light on the wall and you can see where every nail is.
     

  3. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY

  4. BRoberts

    BRoberts TDPRI Member

    77
    May 7, 2003
    Naples, Florida
    Man, I thought you were asking for advice on how to do it- looks like you got a foolproof process goin' on! Don't forget to some strength for pickin' the ol' geetar!
     
    Bones likes this.

  5. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity

    Apr 28, 2003
    Nashville, TN
    Bones... that looks sooooo clean. Excellent work indeed!
     

  6. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    20171110_123617_resized.jpg
    Thanks, having some trouble with pinhole bubbles, you can see it in the pictures. this is usually caused by the lime in the mix reacting with the calcium in the old paint. Also is caused by air trapped in the mud being carried to the surface as it dries, the moisture can't get into the wall because of the multiple layers of latex, so it all comes to the surface. Just have to keep slacking it down and re-skimming it. The walls and ceiling will be like glass when I'm done.

    This is that same area with the bubbles after drying overnight and slacking it this morning
     

  7. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity

    Apr 28, 2003
    Nashville, TN
    There is certainly an art form to getting it right.
     

  8. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    59
    Mar 31, 2007
    victoria b.c. CANADA
    Don't you wind up with a bulge on the wall if you've put fiberglass tape over the hole?

    I've repaired popped screws and nails a number of times over the years and have always just whacked 'em with a hammer or driven them in deeper with a screwdriver...then I use a utility blade to cut the ragged paper nice and smooth around the hole...mud it, sand it, paint it...always seemed to work well.
     

  9. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    the mesh is very thin, but to your point, yes there is nothing flatter than the unmolested surface of the sheetrock, once you add anything to that, you are creating a high spot. The trick is to spread that out over a large enough area that it is not seen of even felt. Same is true of the butt joints. The problem that can occur with not usibg the mesh is shrinkage that leads to cracking . Even normal expansion and contraction from haeting and cooling can crack such repairs. Maybe when doing it in your own hone, it's worth the chance, but we don't like to get call backs about such things, especially when you are dealing with high ceilings and things like that.

    Also, since i am essentially plasteting the walls and ceilings there is no chance of the meshed areas showing through. with a regular repair, you do need to be careful to not build up the area too much
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
    boneyguy likes this.

  10. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity

    Nov 9, 2008
    Detroit
    I knew that was the reason that you did that - being extra careful and using the mesh.

    Callbacks.

    You’re long done with the job, you’re on another job, or you’re at home relaxing, and then that number pops up on your phone - that you recognize ...Oh, they left a message - arghh. Then you realize it’s Mrs. McGillicuddy - and she’s not calling to chat.

    It’s the worst...

    You thought you made X amount on the job and suddenly you made less than X amount.


    You know how when they interview soldiers about the grand mission or the reason they were fighting and invariably they always just say - when you’re out there all you’re trying to do is get you and your friends home - it’s really simple.

    Why do I always try to do the best job I possibly can ? Some golden rule of craftsmanship ? Pride ? What’s that ? I just dont want any callbacks ! :lol:
     

  11. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    We recently finished a job that was so involved, we had a scaffolding company come in and set up staging for us to do the high work, cost $7k for the rental for 1 month. That's not a ceiling we want to have to go back up and repair. But there also is some pride involved. This work is in our house and quite frankly, it's embarrassing to have had such crappy walls and ceilings for the 3 years we have been living here. So I have some time right now and mustered up the energy to work for free. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
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  12. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity

    Nov 9, 2008
    Detroit
    I get it . I’m flippant because callbacks are such a drag but in reality I don’t advertise , so everything is word-of-mouth referrals , so I have to do a good job - and the job’s not done till the customer says it’s done.
     

  13. jhundt

    jhundt Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    63
    Mar 23, 2003
    Netherlands
    Bones, when you skim the wall, do you use a trowel and a hawk, or knives and a pan? Out on the west coast I learned to do this work with knives, but I heard that the east coast they use trowels. Here in Holland where I live now, it's all trowels. And man they love plaster...
     

  14. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    I use trowels and knives with a hawk. I don't know how guys work with those pans, seems very messy to me, but i guess it depends on how you learned We call knives "California knives" I like them for certain things, but they tend ro breakdown quickly and get to soft. Some of my trowels are 30 years old, I think my oldest knive is about 6 months.
     

  15. jvin248

    jvin248 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 18, 2014
    Near Detroit, MI
    .

    When you get to that 1/8th inch skim coat, it would be a good addition of pictures to the post for the 'how to'.

    .
     

  16. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity

    Nov 7, 2009
    Kansas City, MO
    Are we talking about the same thing here? When you tape drywall joints and cover nails you use a trowel? I've only seen banjos or knife and pan...

    EDIT! Sorry, I went back and re-read...SKIM COAT...Gottcha!
     
    Bones likes this.

  17. raito

    raito Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Nov 22, 2010
    Madison, WI
    No kidding. My last house was new, but not expensive. I could tell where the edge of every sheet was if I cared to look.

    When we were getting ready to sell, I had a handyman (who I've known for decades) come around to fix up some small stuff, like the nail pops. He said afterward that he was laughing at the beginning because no one uses nails anymore. Except the guys who built my house. And he figured out why there was water came through the light fixture in the spare room -- but only twice in 10 years (only one side of a vent was watertight, but the weather only came from that direction twice... ).

    New house is much better, but I have children here, so it's more beat up.
     

  18. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity

    Nov 7, 2009
    Kansas City, MO
    I have skimmed miles of walls. I was a foreman for office remodel division for a real estate company and on one job we had a contractor that hastily removed wall covering from all the halls in a four story office building but defaulted on skimming the walls because it was too difficult. That left the whole job in my hands. No help in town and getting behind every hour.

    I worked by myself for a solid week of 15 hour days. What made the job so difficult was the vinyl adhesive used for the wall covering. Had to shellac all the walls before I could skim. I've you've ever tried to skim walls that have adhesive on them you know what I'm saying.

    I used a pan and 12" knife. I tried to use a roto sander but the learning curve was too flat...so I went to a simple vac pole sander and stuck with it. I learned a lot about the compromise between getting the mud flat to begin with and the effort in sanding wavy walls.

    If I go to hell there will be an infinitely long wall that needs skimmed and it will be covered with wall covering paste...
     
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  19. Nightclub Dwight

    Nightclub Dwight Tele-Meister

    294
    Aug 12, 2016
    Pittsburgh
    Those pinholes are my nemesis when I do repairs. What exactly do you mean when you say to keep slaking it down and reskimming? I get the reskimming part, but what is the slaking it down?

    Edit: By slaking, do you mean to mix up another batch of compound?
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017

  20. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    slacking or slaking is plastering technique, where by you re moisten the dry mud with a damp sponge and draw a clean knife or trowel across the moistened area this creates a thin slurry of mud that fills in small imperfections as you work the trowel or knife back and forth. It knocks down high spots and fills in low spots without adding any new mud. It creates a very fine surface and almost eliminates the need for sanding. Slaked lime is something different, but i think this technique is is derived from that process.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
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