Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Fixing Nail Pops in Drywall

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Bones, Nov 9, 2017.

  1. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    There's only 2 ways to get rid of them.

    1.Take down the old rock and Re-sheetrock, tape and spackle.

    2. Screw off the existing sheetrock, send the nails home, cut out the paper around the nail heads, repair with fibre glas mesh tape and setting compound and then skim out the walls and ceiling.

    I opted for option 2.

    20171108_110016_resized.jpg 20171108_111824_resized.jpg 20171108_111820_resized.jpg
     
    24 track likes this.

  2. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity

    Apr 28, 2003
    Nashville, TN
    I need to do it too. I don't have any single wall that has as many issues as you have there... but I do have 25 or 30 of them at various places all over the house. I would opt for your second option as well... but I'm going to wait until we're ready to repaint the interior anyway, since many of the walls with nail pops are different colors.
     
    24 track likes this.

  3. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    we are changing the door casings and base mouldings, so now us the time. The house is about 35 years old and unfortunately built a little on the quick and rough side, plus has had various hack repairs done over the years by previous owners.
     
    24 track likes this.

  4. 24 track

    24 track Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Nov 6, 2014
    kamloops bc
    Is this an older house? when I did the basement here the wood was so dry it was like steel and it killed the nails , so I went with Gyproc screws and ground those puppies in REAL good( it actually sheared the heads off of some of those screws ) the wood was so dryI had never seen that before !
     

  5. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity

    Apr 28, 2003
    Nashville, TN
    I've always wondered what it would be like to frame a house with drywall screws and wood glue at all the 2x4 joints. Yeah... certainly not cost or time effective in the least. Just wonder if it would add any to the structural integrity.
     

  6. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Tele-Holic

    Age:
    65
    908
    Feb 3, 2017
    Foat Wuth, Texas
    What I wonder is if your scheme would make the structure a little TOO rigid....in other words, would expansion and contraction of the components not create too many cracks? Don't know for a fact, just musing. Why don't you try it and let us know?.....
     

  7. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity

    Apr 28, 2003
    Nashville, TN
    Yeah... one mention of my scheme would certainly make any licensed contractor have a good belly laugh. Or if I had more money than sense, he'd probably be all for it.
     
    nojazzhere likes this.

  8. FenderLover

    FenderLover Friend of Leo's

    Jun 11, 2009
    Minnesota
    I whack 'em once with a hammer and mud over it. Never failed me in 30 years.
     
    jvin248, Nickadermis, DonM and 3 others like this.

  9. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity

    Nov 9, 2008
    Detroit
    Different wall mud for different purposes.

    I’ve never used your method Bones but I’m sure they’re never going to come back.

    I have sunk screws adjacent to the nail and then yanked them and filled the holes.

    Set 45 or Set 20 is my best friend in any wall repair endeavor.

    If it’s pre-mixed it’s not for me.
     

  10. Strato50

    Strato50 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    50
    331
    Mar 30, 2017
    Port Arthur TX
    Me to with hot mud.
     

  11. jhundt

    jhundt Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    63
    Mar 23, 2003
    Netherlands
    yeah, seems like a bit of overkill to me, too. But some guys like to do things the very best way, and this method will certainly fulfill that wish. After 35 years in the business, I am pretty much burned out on home-owners seeking perfection. I spend more time trying to manage expectations these days. A suburban ranch home is not the Taj Mahal, and it is not worth my time or the customers money to try to make it seem so. Believe me, after you get it all perfect, it will take no more than 6 months before something else goes wrong.
     
    jvin248 and nojazzhere like this.

  12. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity

    Nov 7, 2009
    Kansas City, MO
    When we sold our house the wife and I repainted the entire house...every room. Naturally, I had to take care of all the wall problems. I perused all the you tubes and arrived at this method. Sink all the offending nail heads using a nail set on the last blow. Use a regular drywall screw sunk tight against the nail. The head of the screw captures the nail head and will never be a problem again.

    30 minute mud and quick sanding and done. House sold in hours...:)
     
    oldgofaster, jvin248 and nojazzhere like this.

  13. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity

    Apr 28, 2003
    Nashville, TN
    I’ve been to the Taj Mahal. No body in their right mind would want to actually live there.
     
    Nickadermis and nojazzhere like this.

  14. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    this doesn't fix anything. the paper is separated from the face of the rock, that's the real problem, there will always be a little air pocket/blister/bubble there. covering it with more mud doesn't fix that.
     
    Nightclub Dwight likes this.

  15. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    yeah, you really shouldn't do repairs with regular pre-mix. The patches in these walls were not even taped, just buried with spackle and painted. the sort of crap work people do when they are flipping a house.
     
    telemnemonics likes this.

  16. FenderLover

    FenderLover Friend of Leo's

    Jun 11, 2009
    Minnesota
    I guess my 30 years experience are wrong then. They should have asked you!
     
    FirTrader, DonM and nojazzhere like this.

  17. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    Well, this is the business that I have been in my entire adult life and we will be staying here at least until my GF retires, so I want it done right. Plus the ceilings have sand paint, so I wanted to get rid of that as well. When done, the house will basically be plastered, the final thickness of the skim will be about 1/8"
     

  18. Bones

    Bones Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 31, 2005
    Luddite Island, NY
    This is how I have made my living since 1983. Drywall finishing and plaster restoration on high end homes in the Hamptons.
     

  19. macaroonie

    macaroonie Friend of Leo's

    ^^^^ this and 25 years in my case. Just get the knack of whacking it in enough to make a little indent with the face of the hammer. If you are feeling generous some mesh tape over the top does no harm but does make your filling process more involved.
     
    Nickadermis likes this.

  20. Obsessed

    Obsessed Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Nov 21, 2012
    Montana
    Wow, that is a bummer, but I would do the same. I'd sand off any blisters too while you're at it. I've been sheetrocking my rough cut stud/timberframe house for about two years now. My main drywall tools are a 1" wood chisel and large mallet to straighten up the walls enough for the drywall to lay flat.:rolleyes:
     
    dented, nojazzhere and Bones like this.

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.