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First build from scratch (tele)

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by truckstopchuckie, Aug 24, 2018.

  1. truckstopchuckie

    truckstopchuckie TDPRI Member

    51
    Nov 12, 2006
    Norway
    Hi. I've had a piece of mahogany laying in the basement for a while and a couple of weeks I finally blow the dust of my tools and started using them for something else than upgrading our house.

    I've done some minor repairs on my own guitars for a while, but never build anything from scratch. The piece of mahogany is pretty heavy (at least that's what I think, weighting about 2450 grams after being routed).

    Did route for binding earlier this evening and have spend the last hours with a couple of beers and a bottle of aceton. I think it turns out rather OK.

    Btw, how long do I have to wait before remove the tape?

    IMG_1202.JPG IMG_1203.JPG IMG_1204.JPG image.jpg
    IMG_1202.JPG IMG_1203.JPG IMG_1204.JPG
     
  2. Meteorman

    Meteorman Tele-Holic

    749
    Dec 23, 2012
    State College PA
    I’d give it all nite. Not needed if ya did the acetone right, but whats the hurry.
    Make sure ya dont get those “couple of beers and a bottle of acetone” mixed up !
     
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  3. ponce

    ponce Tele-Holic

    Age:
    39
    567
    Dec 21, 2011
    Croatia
    That's gonna look nice!
     
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  4. truckstopchuckie

    truckstopchuckie TDPRI Member

    51
    Nov 12, 2006
    Norway
    Thanks! :) It's midnight here, so then I'll let the tape sit untill tomorrow.
    I think I got it right, just enough acetone applied with a small brush.
     
  5. unfamous

    unfamous Tele-Meister

    214
    Jul 19, 2009
    North Georgia
    I read a medical text once which described a fella who had a cup of coffee and a jar of carbon tetrachloride on his workbench. Absent-mindedly, he drank the carbon tet rather than the coffee. Then he died. SAFETY FIRST!
     
  6. truckstopchuckie

    truckstopchuckie TDPRI Member

    51
    Nov 12, 2006
    Norway
    They’re not easily mixed up, but of course, I get your point. ;)
     
  7. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Dec 7, 2009
    Ballard
    That's a beautiful piece of mahogany there.
    I came across a length of mahogany shelving, in place at my parents home of 40+ yrs.
    Took it w/ me rather than watch it go into a dumpster.
    Lacking any serious tools beyond a screwdriver & butter knife, I've got to think long & hard before tracing a shape and whittlin' for the next year or two.

    Please continue to post pics - I'm going to school on yr project.
    Peace - Deeve
     
  8. truckstopchuckie

    truckstopchuckie TDPRI Member

    51
    Nov 12, 2006
    Norway
    Update is that the binding routing was to shallow. Binding wasn't flush with the body, but hopefully an easy fix. Have removed the binding now and will route correct depth tomorrow (or at least within the next week). Not sure if black binding is the way to go. Might order some cream or white and go for a natural finish.
     
  9. Macrogats

    Macrogats Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    51
    May 15, 2017
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Yes, cream binding on a natural finish would look great on that.
     
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  10. truckstopchuckie

    truckstopchuckie TDPRI Member

    51
    Nov 12, 2006
    Norway
    I agree. Both cream and white binding has been ordered. I have a tele deluxe body from guitarbuild.co.uk that have been stoved away for the last 4 years or so that I figured would be nice to put binding on as well.
     
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  11. Macrogats

    Macrogats Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    51
    May 15, 2017
    Auckland, New Zealand
  12. Solaris moon

    Solaris moon Tele-Meister

    Age:
    44
    427
    Nov 12, 2017
    Fort Wayne
    I would've routed the middle like Fender now does with the flange for the lead wires facing towards the bridge. You'd still have some room without worrying about it being too close to the pickguard edge. Also I wouldn't have cut the binding on the edge of the horn - I would've wrapped it around to the side of the neck route, then I would've joined it there with acetone. Otherwise this looks pretty good! I can't wait until it gets finished and put together.
     
  13. truckstopchuckie

    truckstopchuckie TDPRI Member

    51
    Nov 12, 2006
    Norway
    Thanks for the tips, both on the pickup routing and the binding. :)
    The Nashville routing was really more about loosing weight than where I want to go regarding pickups. The body weights something around 2450 grams now, so it’s not a light guitar. I have been thinking of chambering, but don’t have the tools to glue a top on properly. Neither have the body shaved down to the correct thickness... (it is now, but prior putting on a maple top).
     
  14. Solaris moon

    Solaris moon Tele-Meister

    Age:
    44
    427
    Nov 12, 2017
    Fort Wayne
    Here's an easy way to do a top AT HOME: Get two 2 X 4 s' in white pine. Cut them down to three foot lenghts. Get two actual wood pieces (2 feet across each way), or at least MDF 1/2" or thicker and glue your top to your body. Then put the wood over the body and clamp the 2 X 4 s' over the two wood boards with your body in between. This is a little trickier than it sounds, but you can do it. Once you have the two clamped this will allow even pressure across the body top all the way around. I center the 2 X 4 s' so they are even across the body and this makes the top glue evenly so that once my press is opened that there are no gaps in between once the glue has dried. I place the clamps so the they are as far inside towards the center of the boards (over the 2 x4 s') to give even more pressure. I have a picture of this in action somewhere, and the body that I glued with it but not on this computer. Maybe I'll break out the external hard drive and download everything from it tomorrow. A lot of useful pics on there! Any way this is a cheap, and economical way to get professional results without the professional price tag!
     
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  15. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    42
    Aug 28, 2018
    Pittsburgh
    Gosh, it's hard to find wood like that anymore.
     
  16. truckstopchuckie

    truckstopchuckie TDPRI Member

    51
    Nov 12, 2006
    Norway
    Binding is fun. Found the old tele deluxe project and routed it for top binding. Will sand down the top and maybe do a walnut stain (I have some walnut spirit stain after a Costello’esque Jazzmaster project, which didn’t turn out as expected, then refin in something close to Sherwood Green, bur that’s another story). Body is alder, so won’t expect the wood to ‘pop’, but I guess it would maybe turn out OK. We’ll see. I guess I’ll have to do the finish all all over again as the aceton will mess up the finish.

    19A86342-736A-4027-ABF0-EE2A852FD3F4.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2018
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  17. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    342
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Chuckie, since you seem to be between binding, consider something different. I have built a total of 23 guitars to date, all except the tele's bound, some with wood, some with plastic. I've tried several different gluing schemes - my first acoustic I used acetone based cement, I've tried wood glue on some wood binding, but the last dozen or so have all been CA. Wood, pearl, fiber, plastic - it doesn't matter, I use CA. I also bind necks, heads, pick guards, f-holes and even truss rod covers.

    The process is simple and fool proof. Put a wash coat of shellac on the guitar (it helps prevent chip out and keeps glue from coloring the wood), route the channels leaving them a couple of thousands shallow. Bend the binding if it needs it - wood does, plastic normally I'll bend the horns or anything tight. Tape the binding in place as tight as you can get it, but leave little gaps between the tape (half inch or so). Use whatever means necessary to get it tight in the waist or horns - make some cauls and clamps if necessary.

    Now between each piece of tape I wick a tiny drop of water thin CA, being careful to put it right on the seam between binding and wood. Use a pipette. If there is purfling I wick CA onto all the seams. This will very effectively "tack" the binding in place. If there are difficult sections, wick the CA on the seam, hold it with a stick or something, then hit it with a little accelerator - bingo, instantly bound.

    Now I pull the tape and wick a bead of thin CA all the way around the binding - both top and side seam. Water thin CA will almost disappear from the surface. Scrape and finish as usual.

    Here is a 175-thing, binding is white with bwb purfling. I've used CA on all the binding - neck, head, p/g, f-holes

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Oh, by the way, when the acetone glued binding on my first guitar failed I glued it back on with CA.

    So, my humble suggestion - route a nice channel in a hunk of scrap. Take a scrap piece of your binding and glue half of it in the channel with acetone, half with thin CA. Do all the scraping and stuff that you ordinarily would do before finishing. Try to pry each one off. Decide which one you like the most and carry on....
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2018
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  18. truckstopchuckie

    truckstopchuckie TDPRI Member

    51
    Nov 12, 2006
    Norway
    Thanks, FK. I’ve actually been thinking of using CA, but I think it dries both too fast and too strong. Feels a little out of hand. I’ve used CA once before, when I did a refret (my first) on a Squier Bullet strat neck where most of the frets didn’t stay put. Worked out fine, but on a lot of frets I ended up putting on too much CA glue.

    Anyway, it seems like a great idea, so I’ll give it a go. :)
     
  19. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    342
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    I once tried running a bead of medium CA into the channel, then tried to install the binding and tape it in place - it was a complete cluster. The method above lets you take all the time you need to get the binding perfectly seated, then apply small drops to hold it in place, just like a welder tack welding something before running the final bead. When you pull the tape you can see exactly what you are dealing with, run a line of thin CA right at the binding to wood seam and it will just suck itself into the interface. Some people will flood the binding, the problem with that is that its hard to scrape the CA off the wood. If you happen to have any gaps, the CA will drop fill them and you don't have to worry about it when finishing. Fast drying (and the use of accelerator) is an advantage - if you have a tiny place where the binding doesn't want to stay in place just hold it with a push stick or something and hit it will accelerator - it kicks of instantly.

    The only downside is, as I say, its hard to clean the CA off the wood and it does stand out under finish. Be careful with the pipette and you'll be fine.

    FWIW I put a drop of CA under the ends of frets when I install them. Most of the time now I'm doing bound fretboards, but even on plain boards I find it helps stabilize them. I always do it on refret jobs.
     
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  20. mistermikev

    mistermikev Tele-Meister

    Age:
    44
    340
    Feb 20, 2018
    phoenix
    as mentioned: that is one nice piece of mahog. I'm starting to appreciate mahog a lot more these days... it is one of the most simple and beautiful woods. good-on-ya


    some nice binding work there. looks like that red one has some extra perf that is red? what is that? very sleek looking.
     
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