Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Finishing Parts-Caster Body

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by kylebrenn, May 25, 2017.

  1. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    42
    Mar 17, 2003
    albany, ny [not chicago]
    Most of these questions should be answered on the label of the products you use. Most stains are dry enough to finish over after 8-12 hours. Most sanding sealer is ready for sanding and top coats the next day.

    As for sanding, you have much to read. I usually start with 800 to flatten the orange peel and work up to 2000 grit. Water can be used if you're certain that you've plugged all the holes with plumber's putty. Otherwise water will seep into the wood under your finish and cause cracking.

    http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Onlin...nd_Finish_Repair/Wet-sand_before_buffing.html
     

  2. kylebrenn

    kylebrenn TDPRI Member

    Age:
    32
    14
    May 10, 2017
    Indiana
    So in an epic display of my ignorance, how far down do I sand the sanding sealer vs the poly? On the label the sanding sealer only talks about how long between coats and how long to wait until the finish coats without saying anything about sanding.
     

  3. KokoTele

    KokoTele Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    42
    Mar 17, 2003
    albany, ny [not chicago]
    Be sure that you're block-sanding so you get the surface pretty flat. I tend to sand between coats of sanding sealer only if there's an imperfection. If a big bit of dust or a dog hair or something gets in it, you can feel a little bump if you run your fingertips over it. After the last coat of sanding sealer dries, block sand to get it level. Wipe it clean with a damp cloth and some naptha. The little bit of moisture left will evaporate quickly, but will also help you find any pinholes or imperfections that should be addressed before the color coats.
     

  4. ndcaster

    ndcaster Friend of Leo's

    Nov 14, 2013
    Indiana
    a very light coat of shellac on the bare wood will seal it enough so that your dark grain filler will not have stained the flat parts of the wood when you sand the filler back to expose just the filler in the grain
     

  5. kylebrenn

    kylebrenn TDPRI Member

    Age:
    32
    14
    May 10, 2017
    Indiana

  6. kylebrenn

    kylebrenn TDPRI Member

    Age:
    32
    14
    May 10, 2017
    Indiana
    So I'm finished with the spraying and am now waiting a week or so for the lacquer to cure. Then the part that is daunting to me... the wet sanding and polishing. I accidentally sanded through a tiny bit on the back of the guitar wet-sanding the sanding sealer layer, so I have reason to be a little nervous.

    Anyway, a different question... to shield or not to shield? I bought the copper tape, but I have a hollow body, which means that control cavity is WIDE open inside the guitar. Since there's no way I can reach to shield the whole thing, that makes it somewhat worthless to try to shield it, right? Or am I thinking about this wrong?
     

  7. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    First - how many coats (of 3 light passes each) did you apply, from what distance, and at what angle? And what does the surface look like *now* (can you post pictures?)? If the surface has a lot of orange peel - I would suggest NOT sanding yet - apply more material, concentrate on even application, and try to create a reasonably smooth surface.

    OTOH if it's smooth and not wavy - don't sand at all. Just polish it. That's what most finishers do that I know (and what I do), or maybe light sanding to even a spot or two. But if the whole thing needs sanding because of orange peel or waves over the entire thing IMO the coating isn't applied correctly, and sanding can easily go right through it in some areas.
     

  8. kylebrenn

    kylebrenn TDPRI Member

    Age:
    32
    14
    May 10, 2017
    Indiana
    Thanks for the thoughts. To your first question, I did 3 coats of 3 light to medium passes each. Each coat started with a pretty light pass followed by two wet coats. (Side note: Behlen Blush Eraser is awesome.)

    I was considering trying to just go at it with the polish without sanding because there really doesn't seem to be much if any orange-peel going on. I know the finish isn't perfect, but I feel pretty good about it on the whole. I tried to get the light to cooperate in the pics below to show the evenness of the finish. There is one small spot where I accidentally sprayed it on a bit thicker than I wanted so there's a little, not run, but pool(?) of finish about the size of a dime, but thankfully that'll be behind the pickguard so I'm not going to work at making that part perfect.

    So if I try to just go straight to the polishing and I feel like it's not getting the job done, there's no harm in going back and wet-sanding then, right?

     
    Blue Bill likes this.

  9. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Friend of Leo's Ad Free + Supporter

    Feb 15, 2014
    Maine
    Kyle, that's coming along beautifully. No, there's no problem in going back to sanding after trying some polishing. Remember, try to take off as little finish as necessary, it's so easy to sand right through. Go slow and be patient. Start with 1000 grit; if this proves too slow, then try 800 or 600, If you have any scraps that you practiced on, do these first to get a feel for it.

    Don' freak out if you go through, you can re-spray it and try again. Also, beware sanding any corners, they sand through much more readily than flat surfaces.
     

  10. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Absolutely right. A lot of sanding by non-finishers gets done unnecessarily because they think it"needs" to be done. But it only needs to be done if the finish is orange peeled or excessively wavy (or otherwise visibly uneven). And often those things can be fixed with an additional coat or two - a bit heavier.

    If you want to, wet-sand the problem spot - but otherwise polish 'er up!

    PS - some would go heavier for a "glassy" (as opposed to "glossy", which just means shiny) look - and many like them just like that. I've done bodies both ways for people - it's just personal preference.
     

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