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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Final prep before clear - Duplicolor Metallic

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by dankilling, Aug 15, 2017.

  1. dankilling

    dankilling Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 28, 2014
    Lehigh Valley, PA
    Howdy- I've got a nice base coat of blue metallic Duplicolor perfect match acrylic lacquer on my USACG body, but have a few hairs and such I'd like to knock off before clear coating with Behlens nitro instrument lacquer. Can I do a light sand on this finish, or is it a bad idea? Also, what's the best solvent to clean it with before spraying the clear? Thank you!
     

  2. Grux

    Grux Tele-Holic

    Age:
    38
    648
    Jan 10, 2017
    Clarksville, TN
    Do NOT sand your color coat especially metallic, you will regret that decision. Napatha will clean up anything on a finish and once dried you can spray your clear.
     
    dankilling likes this.

  3. zipseattle

    zipseattle TDPRI Member

    90
    May 23, 2013
    Washington state
    Nitro Clear over Acrylic Lacquer Color

    My avatar guitar is Duplicolor Metal Specks blue, with Minwax aerosol lacquer as the clear coat.

    With metallics and clear coat, one way is to mist the color coat on very lightly per coat and use many coats (requires patience). This is to allow the metallic specks to land and stick at various angles, capturing and reflecting the light. If you're doing it right, the metallic color coat will have an almost imperceptible fuzziness. Then, without touching or sanding the color coat, start misting the clear on very lightly, with multiple coats. Once the clear has built up enough to capture and seal the metallic specks, then slightly heavier coats of clear can be applied.

    If the initial coats of clear are too heavy, the solvents will soften the color coat, and the metallic flecks will lay down, reducing the effect. I used a lot of clear to ensure I wouldn't sand through when wet sanding and polishing.

    The end result can be a very deep and rich looking metallic finish.

    https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?ur...hare_fid=78013&share_type=t&share_pid=7804352
     

  4. dsutton24

    dsutton24 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Dec 29, 2010
    Illinois
    Usually you can just lift stray hairs off the surface with the point of an Xacto knife or the like.
     

  5. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Friend of Leo's

    Sep 15, 2007
    Glen Head, NY
    Sanding metallic paint will leave awful scratch marks, I believe it's cutting into the myar or mica flecs or whatever's in there.
     

  6. dankilling

    dankilling Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 28, 2014
    Lehigh Valley, PA
    Thanks for all the advice, folks. Doing the final test fitting before clear. Wish me luck! View attachment 448323
     

  7. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA

  8. dankilling

    dankilling Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 28, 2014
    Lehigh Valley, PA

  9. Doublearon77

    Doublearon77 TDPRI Member

    7
    Apr 10, 2011
    Kansas
    Looking great. I'm getting ready to shoot one in duplicator burnt copper. Did it spray pretty good?
     

  10. dankilling

    dankilling Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 28, 2014
    Lehigh Valley, PA
    I sprayed with the body hanging - when I tried flat I had some splattering issues. I did warm the bottles which I think helped. Good luck!
     

  11. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    "Splattering" isn't prevented by hanging the work. It's usually a case of improper ambient temperature, a dirty spray tip, a very shallow spray angle or partial atomization - i.e. only pressing the tip part way. Aerosol tips have to be fully depressed when spraying normal coating, with the amount applied controlled by speed and distance. It makes a huge difference with metallics.

    Sounds like it may actually have been one or both of the last 2 if "hanging" changed the results. But if it only "helped" check your tip and how you are spraying next time
     

  12. dankilling

    dankilling Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 28, 2014
    Lehigh Valley, PA
    IMG_0242.JPG the finish isn't perfect, but it did shine up nicely.
     
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  13. Slowisfast

    Slowisfast TDPRI Member

    17
    Jul 9, 2014
    Mt. Rainier
    I used a Duplicolor metallic and it was quite a challenge.

    I wouldn't sand. Like someone above me said, an exacto blade spot cleaning would be more effective, imo.

    The thing I learned is that the cleaner and more pristine the spraying environment the better the finished results after it dries. It's sounds obvious, and is, but something that can be overlooked with the excitement of putting color on.

    I was haphazard at first and had inclusions and whatnot.

    My final couple coats I sprayed in a makeshift spray booth that worked quite well and helped to arbitrate the problems I was having in the beginning.

    Last couple coats make sure they're good and wet so you get the metallic flakes to suspend properly.

    That said, no more metallic for me!
     

  14. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    There's another trick with most metallics.

    They generally have to be sprayed in *one* direction. It's true of all all metalflakes made specifically for guitars. The pigments actually need to "stand" with a specific orientation. If you reverse directions, wave the spray gun (or can) or change direction by even 20 or so degrees in the "pass" direction (and virtually at all in the fan angle, which usually needs to be as close to 90 degrees as possible) the metallic pattern and reflectivity with go foul.

    I generally don't recommend using them until you have pretty extensive experience with both solid color and semi-transparent lacquers - and metallics require practice pieces even for many pro finishers unless they're done regularly.
     

  15. Slowisfast

    Slowisfast TDPRI Member

    17
    Jul 9, 2014
    Mt. Rainier
    That's a good word.

    I jumped into the deep end of the pool straight out of the gate. Kinda wish I didn't go metallic on my first git but I can't turn back time. Came out well enough though.

    If I ever do another metallic I'll remember your tip.
     

  16. Grux

    Grux Tele-Holic

    Age:
    38
    648
    Jan 10, 2017
    Clarksville, TN
    Very Nice my friend, love the color!
     

  17. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Yikes! You did *beyond* great considering it was a your first project. Metallics are often trickier than extreme dye jobs, sunbursts - even mild relics. I've seen several red and gold guitars that had visible lines across the bodies that were mysteries to the owners. The whole "directional spray" subject is not very well noted - if noted at all - by manufacturers or distributors.
     

  18. Tommyd55

    Tommyd55 Tele-Meister

    221
    Sep 25, 2013
    Southern Missouri
    Just want to be clear here..
    Are you saying metal-flake should be sprayed on in one direction, like starting with a left to right motion and instead of going back right to left while spraying stop, go back and start the next pass from the left side same as previous?
    Or are you just saying don't go side to side and then top to bottom and such,
     

  19. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Yes - ONE direction only. Every pass from one side to the other (or top to bottom, depending on tip orientation). Never back across (or "up" after "down") or a shift from horizontal to vertical passes. And the spray pattern needs to be kept very close to 90 degrees orientation from the main surface being sprayed.

    It's not necessary with every metallic, but as most manufacturers don't publish any specific application info I suggest applying them that way every time.

    It also can help with overall finish consistency. Back-and-forth passes are generally not a good idea - especially with aerosols - as less-experienced finishers have a natural tendency to "swing" just a bit with heavier application in the center. Working in only one direction takes a bit more concentration and often facilitates better technique.

    Last note - It's also best to do the side color coats first (generally with all color types). This keeps the inevitable overspray from flying across and sticking to the large top and back surfaces - which are the most visible. With metallics that overspray can really foul the look of the top and back.
     
    sfcmark likes this.

  20. dankilling

    dankilling Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 28, 2014
    Lehigh Valley, PA
    A few wiring gremlins to chase down but it's almost together! IMG_0262.JPG IMG_0263.JPG
     
    CoyotesGator likes this.

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