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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

fender vs. vox modeling

Discussion in 'Modeling Amps, Plugins and Apps' started by crizzly_bear, Jun 24, 2014.

  1. crizzly_bear

    crizzly_bear Tele-Meister

    304
    Dec 11, 2013
    Vermont
    Once ive got the money, for sure
     

  2. crizzly_bear

    crizzly_bear Tele-Meister

    304
    Dec 11, 2013
    Vermont
    Bump
    Will any 2 button footswitch work, or will only the fender Mustang footswtiches work with fender mustangs? Did they pull an apple type jerk move?
     

  3. TwangyWhammy

    TwangyWhammy Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 10, 2014
    Under the DownUnder
    Not sure, never had the need to find out. Every Mustang III comes with the 2 button footswitch thrown in for free.

    An original Fender MS4 four button footswitch (optional extra) is only about 50 bucks (10 functions with tuner and LED display). I doubt you could get a generic footswitch any cheaper...
     

  4. Jim Dep

    Jim Dep Friend of Leo's

    May 23, 2010
    Northern Colorado
    I like the Vox ADVT amps. A lot. They sound good BUT....

    There is SO much more you can do on the Mustangs and on many settings they sound at least as good.


    Not sure on the Mustang's 2 button FS, but with the Vox ADVT's, they take Peavey 2 button switches no problem.
     

  5. crizzly_bear

    crizzly_bear Tele-Meister

    304
    Dec 11, 2013
    Vermont
    Went to my local GC to try the mustang 3, and of course they had only the 1, 2 and 4 on display to try out. Tried the 2 and honestly wasnt overly impressed. The clean fender presets sounded okay but anything with distortion sounded..... like trash to put it uncharitably. Speaking mostly on the british 60s and 80s models. Now I know the whole "presets suck you have to dial in good sounds yourself" points, and I also know the 3 has a better speaker and more control. Hopefully the 3 is a big step up because there are plenty for cheap used and I still want one as a fun amp.
     

  6. Jbnaxx

    Jbnaxx Tele-Meister

    194
    Jan 31, 2011
    Arkansas
    I have a Vox Tonelab LE (now discontinued). I really like it now, but it took a long time to warm up to it.
    Good things:
    It has some really good clean sounds in it.
    The delays in it are very good, reverbs are usable.
    It sounds good through a sound board.
    It is quick to set up and no batteries/extra power supplies.
    You can dial up several different sounds and switch between them quickly.
    Not so good things:
    There is a LOT of knob turning and tweaking to be done... to the point of distraction.
    The slightly dirty sounds are not that good... better done with an amp.
    I can't speak on the dirty stuff.... that is not my thing.

    Vox no longer offers anything comparable to the Tonelab LE. If it broke, I would most likely be looking at the Mustang Floor.... or the MIII. I am still debating the floor modeller vs. the modelling amp choice. For now, the floor modeller seems to fit my needs well...... As always YMMV.
     

  7. sjhusting

    sjhusting Tele-Afflicted

    Jul 8, 2003
    Germany
    I've been going through cheap (meaning not AxeFX or Kemper) modellers for a number of years. I bought a Vox Tonelab (ST? the larger current one, I don't know). I wanted to use it to go direct into the PA for some decent electric tones with a primarily acoustic trio I play in. I worked with it for quite some time before abandoning it and going back to a 5-watt tube amp.

    My problems with it were that it was difficult for me to get what I consider really good clean tones out of it. I had to turn the gain down very low to get rid of all the buzzing, but then the output level of the board went down with it. The clean tones I got simply did not satisfy me.

    A few months ago I picked up a Mustang Floor, after checking out what the steelers were doing with the Mustang III over on the PSGF. It's been long enough now, and used it on stage often enough, so that I am through any sort of honeymoon, and I am still happy with the unit. Of course it does very good Fender cleans (which is what I wanted). It is also VERY easy to program, and is laid out as if it had been designed by a human that had actually played on stage. It's not going to replace my tube amps, but it sounds good, it's easy to use, it's easy to program, and I'm not dependent on volume for tone. I run one of the XLR outs into a BSS DI and from there into the mixer (the DI shouldn't be necessary, but this eliminated problems I was having overdriving the line inputs of the mixer).

    Other people get great tones out of the Vox. I couldn't. I can from the Mustang. It's a keeper; for now, at least.

    steven
     

  8. Jbnaxx

    Jbnaxx Tele-Meister

    194
    Jan 31, 2011
    Arkansas
    I totally agree. I had given up in the Vox, but ran into someone who was getting some good tones from his and took up the challenge. It turns out my biggest problem was the small PA system I was playing through (it was one of those small Yamaha Stagepass rigs). I started using a powered floor monitor and things got much better. The presets were junk, so i had to start every patch from scratch...... Finally got there, but it should not be that hard.
    Another friend has been using the MFloor for about a year... He loved it from the first day and still does.
     

  9. bparnell57

    bparnell57 Poster Extraordinaire

    Feb 10, 2014
    Philadelphia, PA
    Yep, manual mode is the way to go...
     

  10. Abu Twangy

    Abu Twangy Friend of Leo's

    Mar 16, 2012
    Rocky Mount, NC
    The first "good" sounding modeler I ever owned was the Vox Tonelab SE.

    Unfortunately when I started playing through Peavey Vypyrs and VIPs as well as Fender Mustangs I realized that there was more of an artificial quality to the models and at times it made me feel like I was playing a midi guitar through a synthesizer.

    On all popular price modelers the presets are designed to awe a fifteen-yrar-old guitarist.
    I really didn't have any appreciation for modelers until I created my own patches.
     

  11. crizzly_bear

    crizzly_bear Tele-Meister

    304
    Dec 11, 2013
    Vermont
    After giving it a lot of thought, I realized I only care about the Mustang really for classic fender tones and not much else. Thinking that way, there are plenty of less digital and less expensive options, like the joyo american sound or something like that.
     

  12. Sleph

    Sleph Friend of Leo's

    Dec 30, 2006
    Australia
    The mustang can sound quite convincingly like a Vox - the Vox however won't do the various Fender sounds any justice IMO.

    Out of the box, my Mustang III sounded very average and hissed as soon as I turned it on.

    After only 2 minutes I was tempted to send it back thinking it was a bad joke.

    I played with it for a bit and let it warm up properly and all the hissing went away.

    Of the 100 presets, there were only 3 that I thought were close to being any good.

    I downloaded the fuse software and cursed and swore for an hour or so because although a lot of thought went into the design of the interface for tweaking the amps and pedals, the same can't be said for how you handle the preset files and change the order of presets in the library.

    I persevered and once I figured out how to change the order of presets I created 5 presets that I saved to the first 5 banks.

    1. Clean Fender Deluxe Reverb

    2. Clean Fender Twin Reverb with a touch of reverb

    3. Roland JC sound with some chorus and delay

    4. Slightly crunchy Vox AC sound for Blues

    5. Fender Supersonic Burn sound

    Having owned or played all these amps, I'd have to say that the mustang does a very convincing emulation of all of them and I can play at bedroom level or live with a drummer without a problem.

    When these amps came out, I wrote them off as a toy for beginners - but after seeing more adventurous musicians gig with them, and now playing my own - I'm now sold.

    I just hope they prove to be robust and reliable for a few years of use....having said that I've had some very expensive tube amps let me down at times and most of them weren't as versatile as this little thing.
     

  13. TwangyWhammy

    TwangyWhammy Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 10, 2014
    Under the DownUnder
    ^ Welcome to the Mustang III appreciation club, Sleph! :)

    I'm glad you persevered with your amp. I can understand why a lot of people have written-off the humble Mustang III far too quickly. Once you get past the preset learning curve, it quickly becomes a no-brainer… too easy.

    I've had mine for just over three months now, and I just keep looking at this little thing and keep thinking it's too good to be true. Not a perfect amp (no one has claimed it to be), but it's a pretty darn good one - considering what it can do for the price.
     

  14. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

    Sep 18, 2011
    los angeles
    Can you elaborate on what you mean by that? On my III I can use/program any stompbox, any reverb and any delay all simultaneously without fuse. So i want to know what you mean in case i'm missing something.
     

  15. Tele Convert

    Tele Convert Tele-Holic

    792
    Apr 1, 2013
    Illinois
    With fuse you can set the fx/stomps to be pedals before the preamp. Or you can set them to be rack type fx after the preamp, like they're in an fx loop, or maybe it's post power amp. For some things one can sound better than the other. Changing the order around can improve the quality as well. Lots and lots of playing around to figure out what sounds good
     

  16. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

    Sep 18, 2011
    los angeles
    Ahh, ok. But you CAN do that w/o fuse. I forgot exactly how, but i have accidentally accessed it on the amp's LCD before and you can indeed arrange the order w/o fuse. I'll see if i can find it again tonite and post back.
     

  17. Tele Convert

    Tele Convert Tele-Holic

    792
    Apr 1, 2013
    Illinois
    Please share if you figure that out. I like to set up presets without having to use fuse. That would be very helpful!
     

  18. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

    Sep 18, 2011
    los angeles
    I'll look tonite, but if i forget PM me.
     

  19. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

    Sep 18, 2011
    los angeles
    Ok, I think you're right, you can't. Or at least i don't see a way. But i did find what i had seen before. if you press the data wheel twice it shows the signal path in order of the effects and all that. But i think thats all it is doing is showing you and you need fuse as you said to change that. I'm just guessing and maybe there is a way. But i don't think so and i believe all that is doing is showing the routing, not giving you a way to change it.
     

  20. Danomo

    Danomo Tele-Holic

    894
    Mar 31, 2014
    Chicago
    Don't even bother with the MI or II, especially if you are the least bit color confused/color blind, as it operates with tri-color LED's for each bank of presets. I have a bronco 40 and it has an almost identical interface, the MIII and above is the only way to go. I spent almost six months with my MIII V1 before I ever connected it to a computer (as the interface is so easy to use), I connected it the first time to just back it up (as I had tweaked so many of the presets). The fuse interface is pretty simple and similar in use to Line 6's pod farm as far as placing/adjusting amps/effects, and is definitely easier/faster to name your presets (many of mine are doubled up, tweaked for my guitars...one for Strat, one for Tele) than one letter at a time using the Data wheel.

    Before the Mustang, I had a tube PA rig (allied electronics), and a FM212R (I'm all about clean first and foremost), and a I've had a line 6 PODxt, and Digitech RP400 multi-function devices. Both had a MUCH bigger/longer learning curve than the MIII, and neither (IMO) sounded as close to regular stomp boxes into my tube rig as the MIII does. I like the all-in-one effects device concept as it makes getting to playing faster than futzing with cables and individual stomps when you just want to jam for a couple hours.

    I traded my FM212R on the Mustang, after just a month with my Mustang, I sold my other modelers, about the time I started using Fuse, I sold my tube rig. It is unlikely I'll ever go back. Before the EXP 1 (expression pedal) came out, I did pick up a Digitech RP255 for the drum machine and Whammy (only features I was really missing from the RP400). I've since got the EXP1 (only downside... has to be set up in fuse on a preset by preset basis), and it does everything pretty dam good... but the Whammy on the RP is a bit better (it should be, it's their trademarked effect), so the RP255 is often patched into my bass amp for drums, or in the Mustangs effect loop for Whammy.

    One last thing on the whammy: It's very likely I'm just used to he RP's responce/sweep using their whammy. I suppose if I just forced myself to use the Mustang's with the Exp1, I might get used to it.
     

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