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fender 65 deluxe reverb vs 68 deluxe reverb

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by slinger, Nov 7, 2016.

  1. Drupoet

    Drupoet NEW MEMBER!

    Age:
    71
    1
    Aug 10, 2017
    upstate New York
    What would be the better amp to use only for analog recording the 65 or the 68 ? After reading all these posts I'm leaning towards the 65 , and in the video the 65 seems to be quieter. Any feedback on this ?? Thanks
     

  2. 1300 E Valencia

    1300 E Valencia Tele-Afflicted

    Dec 13, 2010
    Fullerton CA
    The '68 has reduced negative feedback, which makes it break up earlier. It also makes more noise.
     

  3. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    If both have ben serviced and well set up by a tech it should make no difference - the tubes, bias and speaker will be more important than anything else.
     
    MilwMark likes this.

  4. xafinity

    xafinity Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Dec 24, 2015
    my Mom's basement
    Right from the first page people have been confusing the 68 Deluxe Reverb with the 68 Custom Deluxe Reverb.
     

  5. MilwMark

    MilwMark Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Apr 29, 2013
    near Arnold's
    I think he's talking about the current production models. Maybe you realized that. But I still think they are a horse apiece.
     

  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Yeah, missed that. Still, of many uses they can be set up awful close. Really depends on what music is being played, how loud, what context - the usual variables
     
    MilwMark likes this.

  7. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

    Nov 5, 2013
    NJ
    I like the '68 customs.
    When I had an actual 1968 Twin Reverb, I had it modded.
    And I recognize some of that sound coming out of the '68s .
     

  8. Beaner

    Beaner TDPRI Member

    Age:
    56
    6
    Apr 10, 2016
    Australia
    Holy crap! You paid $600? They’re ove $2000 in Australia. It’s so depressing. When I played in the US, I went nuts buying guitars and amps. In 1984, I picked up a 60s BF Twin for $350. Unbelievable! I saw a SF Twin (70s I reckon) in a pawnbroker’s last week for $2000 and it was wrecked. There are no bargains left in this country. Cheers
     

  9. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west

  10. budglo

    budglo Tele-Meister

    113
    Feb 15, 2015
    NE Ohio
    B is surely brighter, but that is always expected with a new amp. A 50 year old speaker and 50 year old components that drifted in value = difference in tone. I would love to see a drri brand new and a brand new deluxe reverb made with all the original components. I bet the difference would be insignificant imo.
     

  11. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west


    A is vintage and brighter .. B is new and bassier
     

  12. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west

  13. budglo

    budglo Tele-Meister

    113
    Feb 15, 2015
    NE Ohio
    It certainly sounded different, but with gobs of reverb , a poorly setup tele and computer speakers it’s really hard to decern what the differences are imo. Anyone expecting a 50 year old amp to sound like a brand new one doesn’t understand electronics imo. The only thing the demo proved is that they sound different, which you would expect. I think in 67 they used an Oxford speaker.
     

  14. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

    Mar 17, 2003
    Lubbock, TX
    What I watched of the video in the OP showed the demo comparing the Custom channel in the ‘68 Custom to the Vibrato channel of the 65DRRI. That is not a fair comparison....or at least that will exhibit the greatest difference between the two amps because of the mods to the tone stack in that Cuatom channel. The Vibrato channel in the ‘68 Custom should sound very much like the Vibrato channel in the DRRI but for the decreaseof the negative feedback signal and the resulting increase in gain and harmonic content in the output section of the ‘68 Custom.
     

  15. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    True, but wouldn't even need to be made with all the original components. Other than tubes, transformers and a few caps most of the electronic components make only subtle differences most players can't hear.

    A well-maintained BF or SF DR and DRRI - if both have good tubes and speakers are equal - can be "dialed-in" by a good amp to sound virtually the same, with most of the original components still in place on the originals. Fresh filter caps, the right tubes in each with power tubes biased specifically to "match sounds" really level the playing field; a tech (not a "repair guy" - an amp tech that deals with experienced players and "tunes" amps to players' tastes) can swap out various preamp and power tubes and make other small changes that make a blind listening test very surprising.

    But those who buy a DRRI expecting to get the same sounds as a well-maintained original with a mix of original & NOS tubes (if any have needed replacement - FWIW my '66 is still on the original tubes) are often blindsided by the *total* cost. The RI doesn't sound like a BF or SF right out of the box, even when the speaker is broken in (at least to most experienced DR players). By the time the right-sounding tubes are installed, adjustments made and the speaker replaced the parts & labor cost can get close to that of a used, fully-serviced late-70's SF unless the owner can do all the "tweaking" himself. It will lack the resale value and build quality either way.

    The RI's are good amps for those satisfied with the stock sound of the RI, who aren't concerned about future resale price and who are fairly gentle with their gear.

    The Custom '68 is a different sounding amp, however. IMO if Fender wanted to have reduced negative feedback on the "Vintage" channel they should have made it switchable. By making it the the only "setting" they produced an amp with no stock DR sounds.
     
    budglo likes this.

  16. dburns

    dburns Friend of Leo's

    FWIW, I eventually sold it for only $600.

    It was a very nice amp, I just liked my Carmen Ghia and AC10 better. The Ghia for gigs and the Vox for around the house and light duty.
     

  17. budglo

    budglo Tele-Meister

    113
    Feb 15, 2015
    NE Ohio
    I think that’s a fair assessment. I think most people who buy a drri are fine with their stock sound. They sell relatively cheap on the used market. With vintage prices getting ridiculous it’s a good option imo.

    I like the idea of the Custom 68 line as it gives a different voicing than a 65. I have a 68 Princeton Custom and like it because it sounds different than the 65 . Having already having a 65drri it’s a different tonal palate with bigger bass and plenty of mids. The 68 label is more a marketing tool than anything else. I think Fender took the most popular complaints of the 65 ri line and implemented some of those changes hoping to sell a bunch of amps . I think so far it has worked.
     
    Silverface likes this.

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