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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

fender 65 deluxe reverb vs 68 deluxe reverb

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by slinger, Nov 7, 2016.

  1. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west
    Im torn..seen both amps today (reissues)..how can the same amp sound so different?

    I like the look of the 65 but the 68 sounds more open and warmer

    the 65 more compressed and a little more sparkle.....both are the same price.


     

  2. Stingfan73

    Stingfan73 Tele-Afflicted

    May 9, 2012
    The East Coast
    Different circuits. It's as simple, and as complicated as that. I much preferred the Blackface Deluxe Reverb Reissue for it's classic Fender chime and tone. I bought it, and never regretted or thought for even a millisecond that I made the wrong choice. One of the best guitar-related investments I ever made.
     

  3. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west
    More about '65 Deluxe Reverb®
    The 22-watt ’65 Deluxe Reverb® amp is for rock, country or blues players who want a moderately powered amp they can crank up at the gig or in the studio. The full, snappy guitar tones heard on many famous recordings from Memphis to Abbey Road were made using the Deluxe™ amp. Features include dual 6V6 Groove Tubes® output tubes, one 5AR4 rectifier tube, four 12AX7 preamp tubes, two 12AT7 tubes, one 12” 8-ohm Jensen® C-12K speaker, dual channels (normal and vibrato), tube-driven Fender® reverb, tube vibrato, two-button footswitch for reverb and vibrato on-off, black textured vinyl covering and silver grille cloth.
     
    CFFF likes this.

  4. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west
    More about ’68 Custom Deluxe Reverb®
    1968 was a transitional year for Fender amps, with tone that was still pure Fender but a look that was brand new. With a silver-and-turquoise front panel and classy aluminum “drip edge” grille cloth trim, the Deluxe Reverb received a fresh new face as it remained the ideal recording and performing amp. Small, light and moderately powered, it produced big tube tone, with world-class Fender reverb and vibrato effects. For countless guitarists ever since, the Deluxe Reverb has been the go-to amp for classic Fender sound.

    The ’68 Custom Deluxe Reverb Amp pays tribute to the classic look, sound and performance of Fender’s late-’60s “silverface” amps. In a special twist, both channels boast reverb and tremolo, and the “custom” channel has a modified Bassman® tone stack that gives modern players greater tonal flexibility with pedals. The amp also features quicker gain onset and reduced negative feedback for greater touch sensitivity. The ’68 Custom Deluxe Reverb’s single 12” Celestion® G12V-70 speaker also delivers a more distinctively rock ‘n’ roll flavor.
     

  5. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west
    SPECIFICATIONS
    '68 Custom Deluxe Reverb 22W 1x12 Tube Guitar Combo Amp with Celestion G12V-70 Speaker

    • Electronics
      Voltage: 120V
      Wattage: 22 watts @ 8 ohms
      Inputs: Four - (1/4", Two Custom and Two Vintage)
      Speaker Jack: Two 1/4" Parallel
      Channels: Two - (Custom and Vintage)
      Rectifier: Tube (1 x 5AR4)
      Hardware
      Handle: Molded Plastic Strap with Nickel-Plated Caps
      Front Panel: Silverface Style
      Grill Cover: Black Textured Vinyl Covering with Silver-Turquiose Grille Cloth
      Amplifier Depth: 9.5" (24.13cm)
      Amplifier Width: 24.5" (62.2cm)
      Amplifier Height: 17.5" (44.5cm)
      Amplifier Weight: 42lb. (19.05kg)
      Effects: Reverb, Vibrato
      Speakers
      Speaker: One - 12" Celestion G12V-70
      Impedance: 8 ohms
      Tubes
      Pre Amp Tubes: Groove Tubes - (4 x 12AX7), (2 X 12AT7)
      Power Tubes: Groove Tubes - (2 x 6V6)
      Miscellaneous
      Unique Features: Modified Deluxe Reverb all-tube circuitry, shared reverb and tremolo on both channels, "Vintage" channel for traditional silverface operation, modified "Custom" channel with Bassman tone stack, reduced negative feedback for greater touch sensitivity, hand-wired tube sockets, custom-made Schumacher transformers (like the originals), genuine Fender tube-driven spring reverb, genuine Fender tube-driven tremolo ("vibrato"), 1968-style Silverface aluminum trim around silver-turquoise grille cloth, fitted amplifier cover included.
      Accessories
      FootSwitch: 2-button footswitch Included
      Knobs: Vintage-Style Skirted Black Plastic
     

  6. TimothyC

    TimothyC Tele-Holic

    879
    May 12, 2016
    California
    The guitarist shootout on YouTube between these two amps nearly swayed me to the 68, but I got the 65 because in the end I wanted fender clean chime and not bassman like overdrive despite how good it sounded cranked. And the headroom on the 65 is a bit higher which is nice.
     

  7. Stingfan73

    Stingfan73 Tele-Afflicted

    May 9, 2012
    The East Coast
    Blackface Deluxe Reverb can have dirt added with pedals, if needed. Pristine cleans. Silverface sounds nice but not as good cleans, and you can't fix that or offset that with an "add better cleantone" pedal. You can add dirt. You can't add clean.
     
    Marshall Thinline, slinger and JohnS like this.

  8. dburns

    dburns Friend of Leo's

    Can't go wrong either way but you said it yourself, the '68 sounds more 'open' and 'warm'. It's not like the '68 doesn't do clean, it just doesn't stay clean as long.

    If you like Fender amps I think you'd be happy with either. I ended up buying a lighly used '68 for only $600 so that also contributed to my decision, but all things equal I still think the '68 sounds better...it just had more character to my ears.
     

  9. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Because they're not the same amp. Not even close.

    My take: if you like vintage sounds, get the reissue. If you prefer a more modern sound, go for the "Custom".

    I think some folks misunderstand the marketing and think they're getting a vintage DR on one side, and a Bassman-ish on the other. Um, no.

    I like my vintage Fender cleans, so it's the reissue for me. Or more likely a real '68 SF. :D
     
    xafinity likes this.

  10. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west
    both great amps...humm...???...
    [​IMG]
     
    theprofessor likes this.

  11. audiopablo

    audiopablo Tele-Meister

    116
    Jan 11, 2015
    SoCal, CA
    I had both. Now I only have the 65 DRRI. I felt like something was flat in the 68 and it drove me crazy. It did sound great with pedals, but for that foundation tone, I was always left wanting, but that's just me. However...

    Using the 68 live, at volume, in a busy mix (electronic band), it really seemed to cut through, again, especially with the pedals. I kind of wish I kept it for that, but GAS struck, so I sold it. Sounded kind of lovely in stereo with the 65. I think if I was going to go silverface again, I'd get the PRRI 68, for noodling around when the wife goes to sleep.
     
    slinger likes this.

  12. audiopablo

    audiopablo Tele-Meister

    116
    Jan 11, 2015
    SoCal, CA
    Oh, I forgot to add: your pickups and guitar should have a say in this pairing. Case in point: I liked an LP with the 68. I also thought the 60s baja and 68 were a nice match. Again, one dude's opinion. And a fickle opinion it is at that.
     
    slinger likes this.

  13. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west

  14. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west
    wondering if I could get that 68 mellow gain ...with the 65 using a pedal?....fuzz?
     

  15. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west
    and what the heck is a...bassman tone stack?
     

  16. tjpaisleyman

    tjpaisleyman TDPRI Member

    Age:
    22
    63
    May 3, 2016
    Michigan
    I just bought a recent 65 reissue and I love it live. I play classic country and love the clean sounds. However, I don't have any experience with the 68 reissue. So try both. Take your guitars and try them both and the right one will find you.
     

  17. fatcat

    fatcat Friend of Leo's

    Jul 6, 2010
    Very Deep South
    my next amp will be one of the '68s because i like that little extra grit. I'm into dirty clean tones.
     
    jimash and tonyp145 like this.

  18. slinger

    slinger Friend of Leo's

    Mar 7, 2013
    wild west
    ...I see the 65 will breakup and bloom at a higher level..and you cant beat the clean
     

  19. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Can you read a schematic? If so, compare the 5F6A Bassman's tone stack to the BF Deluxe Reverb tone stack. They're not the same.

    The difference between the two amps is very basic: The DR Reissue is a semi-copy of the classic Deluxe Reverb (with printed circuit boards, different components, different cabinet materials and some differences in the electronics - personally I don't view it as a "reissue" at all); The '68 version is another PCB amp, but with very significant circuit difference from the original Deluxe Reverb. Hence - no "reissue" in the name.

    IMO neither is worth the money new when there were SO few differences in hand-wired Deluxe Reverbs through the years. With the right tubes and speaker (and not pulling the "boost" knob) you can make even the latest hand-wired SF Deluxe Reverb sound like a BF. You can't do that with a reissue or '68 Custom.
     
    xafinity likes this.

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