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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

explain the Clapton thing

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by ndcaster, Apr 7, 2017.

  1. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Friend of Leo's Ad Free + Supporter

    Feb 15, 2014
    Maine
    I agree with all that. To my ears, they respected, and were influenced by each other. I think it's fair to say they learned something from one another, that's all. Hendrix was a couple years older, so he had a bit of a head start.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017

  2. jimash

    jimash Tele-Afflicted

    Nov 5, 2013
    NJ
    I have been a fan of Mr. Clapton since 1967.
    That fandom has had ups and downs.
    I happened to see him once, and it was his worst night ever Literally threw his hands up in the air and quit. I do not hold it against him.
    BUT... Jimi Hendrix was 100 times more talented than Eric Clapton,in every conceivable way.

    Here is a description (just for fun) of the Clapton show I saw.
    ERIC CLAPTON


    "He played there at the height of his drug problems and his show sucked.

    He played for maybe 35 minutes and then left without saying a word to the
    Roosevelt Stadium audience...

    Well, almost 10,000 kids then stormed the police barricades and
    caught up with Clapton's limo ..
    right there
    it was on the outfield trying to exit secretly out the back...
    . The crowd surrounded the limo and was shaking it so hard I thought the limo
    was going to flip over..."

    http://www.jerseycityonline.com/rstadium/stories.htm

    It was disturbing, our seats were right over the Limo.. Freddy King was GREAT.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017
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  3. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Friend of Leo's Ad Free + Supporter

    Feb 15, 2014
    Maine
    Except survival.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017
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  4. viccortes285

    viccortes285 Tele-Meister

    Age:
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    371
    Jan 14, 2017
    Phoenix
    Sticking to the thread, overall most agree Clapton had a good foundation and honed it in playing with all styles of top notch gunslinger. Eric paved the way for the others. Clapton is A Guitar God!
     
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  5. Easywombat

    Easywombat TDPRI Member

    78
    Feb 22, 2010
    Cambridge, England
    Best. Thread. Ever. It's like a sit-com. Bickering and insults. Love-ins. People fighting and making up. New characters constantly showing up. Great gags. And all about one central character.

    I had a theory for a while that Clapton was deliberately producing only one great album every decade or so. Beano; Layla; Just One Night; Unplugged. But he hasn't done any albums to spark my interest since Unplugged, so that theory bit the dust.

    But for a slow blues (unless I missed someone else mentioning it, in which case apologies), his version of "Double Trouble" on Just One Night is lovely.
     
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  6. dablues

    dablues Tele-Meister

    221
    Mar 21, 2007
    Lynden, WA
    I'm coming into this thread late, and just want to add my two cents. I started out adoring EC and SRV, then discovered their heroes and dropped them. Now I'm rediscovering EC again, and I do agree that there does seem to be a real pre-Eric and post-Eric type of rock-blues guitar soloing, IMHO. EC was such an intentional phraser of licks, even if they were borrowed. He really does project a power and soul, and this is coming from a guy who HATED the concert I went to in Vancouver, when he played with Robert Cray and RC blew him OUT THA WATER.

    I think I'm just seeing that he was an important evolver of blues rock guitar, if not a total innovator.
     
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  7. jimash

    jimash Tele-Afflicted

    Nov 5, 2013
    NJ

    If you look at it that way he is kind of an ambassador of the Blues like the late B.B. King.
     
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  8. BlueCollarBoy

    BlueCollarBoy Tele-Meister

    Age:
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    Mar 13, 2016
    Eminence, Ky
    Yeah it has to do with "when" you got into music. Same thing with Hendrix. Me being born in 73, I didn't get into music til the early 80's. Being a guitarist, "now", i can see his innovation , but at that time I was cutting my teeth on EVH, Angus Young ect..., so i didn't get it at the time
     
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  9. richiek65

    richiek65 Tele-Holic

    Regarding him being the easiest to play from a long list of guitar heroes, yep, probably no arguments from me, but maybe part of his appeal is that he's accessible from a guitarists point of view, to the point where a schmuck like me can try and delve into his solos and will have half a chance of working out why what he plays is so effective, and then i might be able to get a few licks that i never might have played start to creep into my own playing.. i can't do that with Yngwie..

    And for how many decades was BB King considered one of the foremost proponents of powerful, soulful blues guitar playing? Easy to copy? Maybe... Easy to create BBK licks from scratch? Somewhat harder... easy to come up with a whole style of playing where SO much is extracted from a scale of 5 to 7 notes? I don't stand a chance..

    And not related to this or any other statement in this fantastic thread, here's one of my favorite clapton songs.. not sure if it's EC or George Terry doing the 2nd solo..sounds EC but i think Mr Terry was player enough to hold his own with his boss..

    And the drumming here by Jamie Oldaker is some of the best I've ever heard by anyone

     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017
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  10. dablues

    dablues Tele-Meister

    221
    Mar 21, 2007
    Lynden, WA
    Exactly!
     
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  11. burntfrijoles

    burntfrijoles Friend of Leo's

    Feb 12, 2010
    Jacksonville

    This is like many threads that either praise, criticize or question a guitarist's place in history. (Or a band's place in history- I once posted how I had lost interest in Zeppelin. Oh the humanity!). People get real passionate in these types of threads and a little personal (self included).
    Upon reflection, no guitarist, band etc needs to be "explained". If one doesn't get "it" then that's fine. For example, I will never "get" Yngwie Malmsteen.
    Like a lot of folks when you discover a guitarist or a sound, you're just scratching the surface because that guitarist had influences. Since you mentioned "Double Trouble", I wouldn't know about Otis Rush if not for Eric Clapton.
     

  12. Maxwell Street

    Maxwell Street Friend of Leo's

    Feb 18, 2009
    chicago usa
    this is an interesting interview...talking about the difficulty for one guitarist to approximate Robert Johnson

     

  13. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Nov 5, 2006
    Iowa City, IA
    Hey, an opportunity for one of my favorite stories. Who knows how many times I've told it here.

    When I was a sophomore in high school, my band had a gig one Saturday night. That afternoon, the bass player and still best friend and I were riding around our small, isolated desert town in Eastern Washington State. [Oh-oh, I see this is going to be the long version, sorry.] We often idly drove around town, usually with the drummer and sometimes our manager. We were rabid rehearsers, and would usually take a break to go out and ride around, then come back to play through again whatever we had been working on earlier.

    Fast-forward a year and a half, and now we sometimes ride around with 4 of us in the car, and two of us in the back seat, lying face down with our jackets covering our heads. The back seat area of cars back then was huge, especially the bass player's Dad's '49 Olds, a steel (or was it iron?) behemoth we called the Black Dart, with an interior large enough to walk around in. By this time, we were itching to bust out of town, and did later, and had become so bored with driving around, that we came up with this stupid game. The guys in back would lie down and cover their heads, while the guys in front would drive-navigate around town the way that kidnappers are supposed to. Ideally, all of the repetitive circles, blacktop-gravel-dirt-grass surfaces, would throw off the backseat boys' orientation, so that when the big reveal was made, it would maximally blow their minds. I remember getting our minds blown by seeing that we were parked in the high school courtyard, facing the flagpole, or the back side of some modest apartments, with the car angled so that the image was that of a New York tenement. But shorter.

    Back to Saturday afternoon before the gig. The White Album had just been acquired by the radio station that day, and we happened to hear Birthday. We were almost home anyway, so the song was fresh in our heads as we ran into the house to play what we remembered, as well as write down the words. We got through it fine at the gig and just thought that we were the cat's meow. But then Delsing showed up to pick up the PA cabs that we had rented from him. Terry Delsing was a friend/thorn-in-the-side who was only passable as a bass player, but was always the guy who knew the latest news, such as Paul being dead. He must have heard us play, as he told us we had left out the "we're going to a party, party" section. Terry did the music editing on the film Walk the Line.
     
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  14. Route67

    Route67 Tele-Meister

    Age:
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    368
    Jan 14, 2017
    Canada
    Fantastic! Yet another great post. This thread has brought to the table multiple points of view of appreciation and insights. Great stuff
     
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  15. Agitator

    Agitator Friend of Leo's

    Nov 22, 2010
    In transit
    I think you can explain or understand the historical context of an artist regardless of whether you enjoy their music or not.
     

  16. burntfrijoles

    burntfrijoles Friend of Leo's

    Feb 12, 2010
    Jacksonville

    That was cool and very insightful. I think that's one of EC's best qualities: his respect for the music. It also shows that it's not easy to just pick up the guitar and play this stuff. No matter how simple the Blues may seem there are nuances to its many forms and styles. Additionally, Clapton's versatility is amazing.
    While I personally feel he went somewhat off the track with his tone and overplaying leads in his later years, he can also dial it back. When he does, he is still most enjoyable to hear.
     
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  17. t guitar floyd

    t guitar floyd Tele-Meister

    Age:
    70
    490
    Feb 4, 2016
    sw US
    Doubt seriously that anyone here really believes these guitar players are gods . . . that's just hype. There are posters who find Clapton to be up there in their favorites list, myself included. I find some of Clapton's solos to be easier than some of his others, same as SRV, same as Hendrix, Santana, etc. I also know that Clapton went way beyond just the pentatonics.

    Seems you're trying very hard to rain on the Clapton thread . . . sounds like insecurity to me. Just mho. Ymmv. (and all those other acronyms) :)
     
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  18. Route67

    Route67 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    50
    368
    Jan 14, 2017
    Canada
    At this point, any opposition here has served to strengthen the Clapton cause, imo. The recent clip of Clapton discussing and interpreting Robert Johnson was icing on the cake for me. I don't like to use the word God in deference to those who are religious, but Clapton seems at least committed to the pantheon of guitar greats. It's been educational.
     
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  19. vid1900

    vid1900 Tele-Meister

    121
    Dec 21, 2016
    usa
    This is not a "let's praise EC thread".

    This is a "Explain the EC thing" thread.

    Most posters here are trying to explain the anomaly that is know as EC.

    Some people are going to paint his name on walls, and others are going to say that he stole their 1st girlfriend and tried to get them kicked out of England.

    Relax, and give everyone space to state their own opinion.


    People tend to resort to insults when they have run out of substance.
     
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  20. t guitar floyd

    t guitar floyd Tele-Meister

    Age:
    70
    490
    Feb 4, 2016
    sw US
    I'm relaxed and stating my own opinion. . . which is that when guitar players go on and on about putting another player down, it reeks of insecurity. Not being insulting, just observant. :)
     
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