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Evans Pull String relocation

Discussion in 'B-Bender Forum' started by Silverface, Jul 30, 2018.

  1. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    ^^^^^ This, without question.

    And when you learn how to play it I suggest a few things:

    1. Don't try to imitate a pedal steel. It usually sounds like...errrr...poo. It' NOT the same thing, and despite Gene's early Stringbender ads none of the early Stringbender players - nor Clarence White or Bob Warford, the two pre-commercial bender players - ever played/play fake steel.
    2. If you learn other bender players' solos, learn them as exercises in technique - and then never play them again. Be your OWN player, not a musical Xerox machine. Even in a cover band you can play solos that are close - but are still "you".
    3. Don't approach the instrument as a guitar with a bender that you use for some songs, like an effects pedal. When you play a b-bender guitar, play it like a completely different instrument. If you want to "bend strings on a guitar" do it by hand. Or just buy a Hipshot. However, if you're going to invest in a high quality bender listen to Clarence White and Bob Warford's studio work (and Clarence's later work with the Byrds, primarily bootlegs from '71-72)and Bob's live recordings with Linda Ronstadt and the Everly Brothers. Don't pay so much attention to "licks" as "integration". Make the bender as much a normal part of the instrument as a pickup or tone knob.

    Several have done this because the like another instrument better; Albert Lee had his re-mounted in the original Evans body (he'd had it transplanted to a '53 Tele years ago).
     

  2. Rick Towne

    Rick Towne Tele-Afflicted

    Mar 16, 2003
    Woodland Hills, CA
     

  3. Rick Towne

    Rick Towne Tele-Afflicted

    Mar 16, 2003
    Woodland Hills, CA
    As a followup to the last post, I highly recommend Bob Warford's two songs on Michael Dinner's "Great Pretender" and several on (at least) one of Ian Matthews'. Clean, precise, subtle and complex, all at the same time.
     

  4. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

    Mar 17, 2003
    Charlotte NC
    >off track from the initial topic but in response to a few comments<

    I don't disagree with Silverface, but I also say learn the Steel phrases, ( not as a crutch) you may discover a hidden gem on the fret board. I am a Steel payer but now and then I play a simple gig on the Bender only, it's the same songs. I still play the intro's and turns , maybe not exact, but similar. It's about the songs, not necessarily the instrument.

    The magic of the Bender , as stated many times , is to be unique if possible. If all we are doing is copying a lick or phrase, then thats all we will ever know, a copy version of something without actually knowing WHY it works. No different than any other instrument we may study. Doesn't matter if it's rock and roll or straight ahead country.

    We each have a style, a thought process as to what we play. We should incorporate the Bender into that process. It's an addition to what we already do, be it a Pull or Release Remember, it works both directions. Pull Up, Release Down. If we are playing out of 3 or 4 fret board positions, the goal is to KNOW which of those positions best fit a PULL or a RELEASE. But we are still playing out of 3 or 4 fret board positions , that doesn't change. As stated, we are adding the Bender to what we are already doing.

    The magic comes from adding the pull or release to a phrase or position that you already know and use all the time. Knowing the fret board is paramount, with or without the bender.

    Regarding fret board positions, many players already know multiple positions but don't use them on a regular basis, kinda locking themselves out. In addition, sometimes its the left hand fingering that allows the PULL or RELEASE to be executed, we may have to change the way we approach a chord shape.

    I believe what is mentioned above is accurate, it is a 6 string guitar, but with a puller on it , it's a different instrument and has to viewed as a different instrument or we may end up just playing a few COPY licks . It's a study .

    Below is a rudiment I play every day, I take it around the horn I,IV and V. It's one of a few. I am a country player first so this is home for me, but playing things such as Moondance etc..also allows for the pulls/releases in the right places as long as the chord shapes are conducive.

    And no, I am not a resident expert, not even close. Just another slug with a bender in my hands rather than in the closet !

    This rudiment may not appear to be much, and may appear to be rather simplistic, but it starts on the 10th fret and works it's way back down and ends on the 2nd fret. None of it is a typical across the fret board BAR 1st finger bar chord position. No BAR chords. 10th fret, 7th fret, 5th fret and 2nd fret. All out of the D scale, 3 different chord shapes. Then move it to G, ( 15th fret) then A , starting on the 2nd fret) then back to D. Do this 5 or 6 times around the horn and you'll need a nap. :) This one, for me, is about understanding multiple positions and placing them in auto pilot. This is one of several that I place into practice very often. Some days I can execute flawlessly other days, not even close.

    Keep in mind, as with ANY rudiment, each position has value for something else, some other phrase. It's about the varied positions.

    MP3

    http://www.tprior.com/rudiment 1.mp3


    Benders are really fun powerful instruments but they can be exhausting sometimes .
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
    asatfan likes this.

  5. Pineears

    Pineears Tele-Holic

    984
    Jun 25, 2016
    Texas
    Hey I didn’t know I had my own rudiment for practice. Made me realize I need to add to it, bring it up to date.

     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
    asatfan and T Prior like this.

  6. asatfan

    asatfan Friend of Leo's

    T Prior, Nice touch and clarity! Thanks!
     
    T Prior likes this.

  7. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Excellent point. I wasn't completely clear about how I handle those things. It's not that I don't play something recognizable, I definitely "play the song"(intro, hook, whatever) - but play it using the specific instrument's strengths. I play pedal steel as well, and while I might play the intro to "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere" on on either instrument, it'll be close enough to Lloyd Green's intro in "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" to be recognizable neither will be exact copies.

    To me that's boring and not all that creative. So in each case I'll "play the instrument", using its strengths and my style (as bad as it is :lol:) to "play the song" in a recognizable - but personal - way.
     
    telex76, asatfan, JDB2 and 1 other person like this.

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