Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups darrenriley.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Dual Notched Guitar Neck Straight Edge

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by theleman, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. theleman

    theleman Tele-Meister

    141
    Sep 11, 2017
    Mars
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Some find it useful. It's for determining when the fretboard is straight when doing a fret job. Personally I don't think it is necessary and would rather have a machined and accurate straight edge. They have only existed the last 10-15 years and people have been doing repairs and fretwork for way longer than that. Maybe it would be a good tool in the arsenal if you are a pro repairman. Many notch a metal yardstick and flatten the bottom for the same result.
     
    theleman likes this.
  3. theleman

    theleman Tele-Meister

    141
    Sep 11, 2017
    Mars
    I have got mine delivered today. When I place it on my Strat type guitar, the notched don't all fit onto the frets. It fits to maybe first half of the frets, and then the rest just sits on the top of the frets.

    Am I using it wrong? Or is it supposed to be like that?
     
  4. theleman

    theleman Tele-Meister

    141
    Sep 11, 2017
    Mars
    Maybe it is only supposed to fit to Les Paul type guitars? I don't have any LPs.
     
  5. theleman

    theleman Tele-Meister

    141
    Sep 11, 2017
    Mars
    Found a demo on youtube. Maybe I should be watching them before using it.



     
  6. TimTam

    TimTam Tele-Meister

    415
    Jun 4, 2010
    Melbourne
    Assuming your guitar has a 25.5" scale and that is what your notched straight edge is too, then it should fit. But some start with a notch that sits over the first fret, while on others the first notch sits over the nut, or just buts up against it.
     
    theleman likes this.
  7. theleman

    theleman Tele-Meister

    141
    Sep 11, 2017
    Mars
    So it cannot be used to check all guitars. Quite limited tool then. I have parlour acoustics, jumbos and dreads as well as Strat and Tele type electrics.
     
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Your link states it is for Gibson and Fender scales....24.74 and 25.5. One side fits one, the other side is the other one. It would be limited to those scales.
     
    theleman likes this.
  9. theleman

    theleman Tele-Meister

    141
    Sep 11, 2017
    Mars
    Got you. I have only 1x Fender strat. The rest are parts casters and acoustics and dobros.

    I think I will return it for full refund, and just go for plain straight edge, which will work on all guitars.
     
  10. TimTam

    TimTam Tele-Meister

    415
    Jun 4, 2010
    Melbourne
    Most of those probably have 25.5" scales. So it will handle most of them. Plus the other side handles any that have 24.75" scales. The 25.5" will even handle 24" inch scales, if you place its 2nd fret notch over the 1st fret of the 24" scale neck.

    Plus the edge between the notches can be used as a regular straight edge that can be placed on the frets.

    So all in all I wouldn't call that 'limited'. ;)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale_length_(string_instruments)
     
    theleman likes this.
  11. DugT

    DugT Tele-Holic

    511
    Sep 22, 2017
    northern CA
    I would think you could use it as a regular straight edge if you positioned it so that it was riding on the frets.
     
  12. Doctorx33

    Doctorx33 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    63
    Jun 8, 2014
    Atlanta
    I have one of those kind of dual scale length rules. It will work on both a 25.5" and 24" scales. I haven't fooled with it much but you just have to keep turning it over until it lines up, each side is different.
     
    theleman likes this.
  13. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    64
    Mar 23, 2003
    Netherlands
    looks like it would be dead easy to make for under 5$ with a piece of aluminum strip from the hardware store and a file.
     
    nsmith01tx likes this.
  14. OpenG Capo4

    OpenG Capo4 Friend of Leo's

    Aug 4, 2010
    Athens, GA
    Hardware store extruded aluminum (and steel, for that matter) isn't flat though. It's actually quite wavy. So a proper aluminum straightedge would have to have it's edge flattened on a surface plate. I started off using a steel yardstick but it is a couple thou off over it's 36" span.

    I like the notched edge on my new builds and refrets because I can set the fretboard perfectly flat and then true the frets to it.
     
  15. Pickin N Grinin

    Pickin N Grinin Tele-Meister

    287
    Mar 9, 2008
    New Jersey U.S.A.
    The one I bought handles my Fender guitars fret spacing on one side and my Les Paul on the other. Maybe yours was just cut wrong. It is a nice tool to have and allowed me to get my Les Pauls neck dead flat before a recent fret leveling. Maybe its not a tool you can't do without but for me, I like tools and I feel its value outweighs its price by far.
     
  16. Strebs

    Strebs Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    272
    Dec 24, 2015
    Michigan
    I have one and like it. It makes leveling a neck before the frets are leveled easier. Other than that, a normal straight edge is more useful. I doubt mine will ever get that much use, but it wasn't expensive and will live in the tube it came in alongside my other guitar tools.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.