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Drill Press Table [project]

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by moosie, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    So, some of you helped me decide on a new drill press, and some others of you watched me build a workbench for my nascent garage-corner woodshop. Drilling the through holes in the bench 4x4 legs was a pain without a woodworking table on the drill. I slapped together a quick, disposable one to get through the job, but right then I decided designing and building a proper drill press table would be the next project.

    I got the initial idea from a variety of y/t videos, and merged the stuff I liked.

    It's about 1/3 complete, so I'll post what I have, and then it'll be day by day updates after that.

    The person who might find these threads most useful is someone new to woodworking (like me), who has very few decent tools (like me).

    Before I forget, I LOVE this Grizzly G7943!


    OK, here's the design I drew in SketchUp. Different colors so I can keep track of the main pieces, and the drill chuck is centered on the blue Y-axis.


    Screen Shot 2017-06-15 at 3.08.22 AM.png

    Screen Shot 2017-06-15 at 3.07.52 AM.png

    Screen Shot 2017-06-15 at 3.07.03 AM.png

    Parts consist of 3/4" AC plywood for the top, sub-top, and bottom, back, and for the drawer frame verticals. Also drawer false fronts. 1/2" plywood for the drawer sides, front, rear. 1/4" plywood for the drawer bottoms. I've got three Incra T-Track Plus's, the kind with the scale on them. Two for the fence, and one ON the fence, for a stop. I can also toss a clamp or two in any of these tracks.

    Notice that the fence T-bolts run up through a slot, not a hole. This will allow the fence to be angled, for any reason. I'm not sure why I might want this, but it seemed easy to add.

    The table attaches to the cast iron table with four 1/2" machine bolts, slotted into the table's X-shaped T-Tracks. Since there are no through holes in the cast iron table, the sub-top (cyan color) will be counterbored for the nuts. The nuts will be covered by the upper-top, and accessible through the sacrificial square.

    The table is a generous 18" x 30", and the drawers are roughly 18" deep by 3" high and 7" wide.


    I don't have pictures of the boring part. Since my table saw is a little piece of crap Makita, I break up full sheets of plywood with a circular saw and cutting guide. Once the pieces are more manageable, I'll do rips on the table saw. I've never done any cross-cutting on it, though. But I need to, especially if these drawer parts are going to have any consistency. Problem is the dumb saw has non-standard miter slots. So, first thing I did was make a cross-cut sled:

    IMG_3968.JPG

    3/4" MDF body, a scrap-but-straight piece of 1/2" plywood acting as a hanger against the side of the saw deck. I wanted it shallow (1/2") because the edge of the table isn't square. It tapers outward at the bottom. Dumb. The fence stops short of the width of the body simply because that's all I had handy. Close enough. The picture shows a stop set to cut drawer backs and fronts. I had to sand the old gray paint on the table, because nothing slides very well. If I keep using this, I'm gonna wax the table, and the edge.

    I say "if", because I already have my eye on a Grizzly G0690 or G1023RL. Toss up. Problem is how to get the 500 lb beast from lift-gated "curb service", 225 feet down my driveway and into my garage / shop. I digress, but jeez, I can't stop thinking about having one of these. My saw is SO CRAPPY, and sooner or later it's gonna take off an arm. That's my self-justification. It's a life-saving thing ;):D


    I cut all the drawer pieces, and next I needed to rout a dado for the 1/4" drawer bottom to slide in. Sure wish I had a router table. That's one of the upcoming projects on my list, but for today, I made this:

    IMG_3969.JPG

    IMG_3971.JPG

    Once that was completed, the dado cutting went very fast.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2017
    Mat UK likes this.
  2. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    I'm using pocket hole joinery for this project. It's so easy with a Kreg K4 jig.

    Here's a stock image that looks like what I did this evening...

    [​IMG]

    A bit of glue, and some 1" pan head Kreg screws. Solid as a rock.

    Last, slide in the drawer bottom, and tack it with a single small nail.

    IMG_3978.JPG

    IMG_3974.JPG


    Last thing I did today was to sand the top and bottom edges. Tops so I don't get splinters, and bottoms so they slide smoothly.

    IMG_3975.JPG

    That's all for now. I'll be back soon, I hope.
     
    RogerC and Mat UK like this.
  3. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Holic

    807
    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    I'll be following this. Very interesting
     
    moosie likes this.
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  5. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Mar 30, 2011
    Oklamerica
    Yep, making tools and jigs to build tools and jigs. It's like we're all stuck in some sort of mobius strip of building :lol:
     
  6. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Yeah, irony is piling up even faster than my scrap pile.

    Last evening the wife asks what it is that I've been building lately. I think she heard: "A table to work on, which required a ridiculously large drill, for some reason, and now a piece of furniture to hang off it, because somehow it'll work better that way, and I wasn't smart enough to buy one with the furniture already attached." :lol:

    As soon as I get enough tools and jigs to do a decent job of it, I need to make something for HER. Anything.

    I'm still breezing past the idea that all this has anything to do with more damn guitars. That's OK, it'll be a while yet.
     
    richa likes this.
  7. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    47
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    One thing you should seriously consider is splitting the fence and making a provision for dust/chip collection. The drill press can make a HUGE mess, especially with larger Forstner bits.
     
    moosie likes this.
  8. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Thanks. Yeah, I've considered it, mostly before I settled on a dedicated spindle sander. I know I'll be notching the fence so it clears the chuck for close work.
     
    BorderRadio likes this.
  9. richa

    richa Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    982
    Apr 23, 2016
    Washington
    Thats gonna be a thing of beauty.
     
    moosie likes this.
  10. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    I'm beginning to think I should laminate the top & fence for better resistance and easier sliding. Where's the dividing line between a tool for projects, and a project? Hmmm
     
  11. Mr BC

    Mr BC TDPRI Member

    Age:
    42
    81
    Dec 8, 2012
    Raleigh area, NC
    I'll +1 this. One thing to considee, if you haven't already, is how tall your fence is. It can't be really tall or the chuck might hit it when drilling, especially holes close yo the edge of the work. I never thought of that until mine wouldn't drill as deep as I wanted. It took me a bit to figure out why it was happening. I trimmed down my fence, but I need to think about how I'll incorporate chip collection with a shorter fence. I think rockler has a dedicated drill press dust chute or something. It's long and narrow and is incorporated into the fence. Might work....
     
    Frodebro likes this.
  12. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    On the saw delivery thing, sometimes a driver can be induced if a polite request is accompanied by a $50 bill. Seem a lot, until you compare it with a 500 lb object and 225 ft. of driveway. Failing a cooperative driver, I think Harbor Fright's 4-caster dollies are rated for that, if your driveway is smooth, with no major ups or downs. Or you could rent a Home Depot or Lowes truck for an hour or two if there's one nearby.

    Really nice table you got going. I have yet to solve the chip collection vs. work piece size/ depth issue, but there is no doubt that a decent size Forstner bit in MDF is the messiest thing in my shop.
     
  13. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    47
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    I've got a split fence on mine so the chuck has plenty of clearance-but the feed handle hits it if the table is up too high.
     
  14. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Nah, $50 won't cover it. There's just no way an 18-wheeler is getting down my driveway. And I wouldn't want to replace the driveway in a year because it did!

    If I use a HD truck, it's still pretty high off the ground at the garage... or do they have lift gates?

    I was talking to someone yesterday, walking the driveway, and they suggested the mover's dollies like you mention. HFs are super cheap, like $12, though I'm not sure the rating on that one. I think the driveway is OK for one of those, but I think I'd have trouble using a pallet jack, with the solid steel cylinder wheels. The trucking company has confirmed they'll have it on one of those, and I'm free to pull it up the drive while they wait. But I don't like the sound of that. I try not to remember I'm disabled, but ... there's a very good chance the guy will simply have to leave, and the beast will be stranded halfway up the drive.

    If I use the HF dollies, I can tie it to the car bumper... Here, hold my beer. Watch this! :D But I'm only half kidding...
     
  15. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    So help me out here. Split fence... I already figured I'd notch the top pretty deeply, for chuck clearance, but I assume you mean something like this:

    [​IMG]


    If the fence is truly split, two pieces, then how do they stay in line? I can't imagine the DC shroud keeps them aligned very well...
     
  16. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    47
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    That's the exact fence I have. The two white boards are attached to the blue aluminum frame, which spans the entire width.
     
  17. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    47
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    Here's the back:

    IMG_1429.jpg

    Here's the handle bumping the fence:

    IMG_1430.jpg
     
    BorderRadio likes this.
  18. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Thanks for the photos!

    This is really sweet. I'm not immediately seeing how to roll my own, though, with the split, and the DC.

    Does the shroud remove easily? Looks like between it and the fence, it's hogging a lot of my throat depth.


    Now I'm thoroughly sidetracked... not really. I can always replace the fence later on... but these are good things to have...

    Here's an interesting fence, made from the Incra track. http://www.boat-project.com/woodworking/drillpressfence.htm

    And check out his simple dust collection.
     
  19. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    47
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    Honestly, that fence is off of the table more than it's on it. Clearance is definitely a problem for some things, and I usually just clamp a length of straight 1x2 to the top of the table and secure the open end of my shop vac hose close to the chuck with another clamp. At some point I want to run a couple more sections of T-track parallel to the existing ones, only much closer to the outer edges of the table.

    The only real advantage of using the fence is when you want to drill a series of holes based off of a common reference point, for drilling just one or two holes the fence is completely unnecessary. For holes up to about 1/2" I just hold the workpiece with one hand and get on with it, but for bits larger than that I always have at least one clamp on the wood to keep it from getting spun around on me. That's where the additional T-track would be nice to have, as I often have to get creative when securing larger or oddly-shaped pieces to the table.
     
  20. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    47
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    Here's another angle of the whole thing:

    IMG_1431.jpg

    The T-bolts that secure the fence to the table slip through the holes at the rear ends of the slots.
     
  21. moosie

    moosie Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Yep. In that sense, I imagine not having much use for it in guitar work. But for general woodworking... well, I've already needed it to drill the legs of my new workbench. A good fence, with stop, was exactly what I needed.

    I find myself clamping most things, for accuracy as much as safety.
     
    Frodebro likes this.
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