Dremel Experts needed (Pilot Holes)

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by ElectricB, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. ElectricB

    ElectricB NEW MEMBER!

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    In this video, Paul Waller builds a Strat. Can someone tell me what Dremel bit he is using to drill pilot holes for the tuners (at 8:10) and pickguard holes (10:26)? Seems like it would be a good way to prevent laquer cracking when pilot holes are drilled.

     
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  2. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    It's really hard to see what's actually going on because of image quality, but I don't believe he's drilling holes in those shots but rather chamfering some that are already there. I don't think there's any way you're going to drill a hole as fast as what he's moving in the tuner shot.
     
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  3. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    +1 on what Roger is saying... he initially runs a ream through the ferrules to clean out the goop that accumulates when they are pressed in.. then chamfers the rear just to clean 'em up..

    r
     
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  4. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Tele-Holic Gold Supporter

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    From the speed he's working, I would guess that the chamfer tool he is using is an abrasive grit, rather than a cutting tool.

    You can buy the abrasive grit Dremel bit at most of the big-box stores (Lowe's, Home Depot).
     
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  5. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

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    Not sure what he's using but I use this Dremel bit for chamfering the edges of my small screw holes. They come in a two-pack. I DO NOT run them in a Dremel, I just chuck them in a pin vise and spin them gently by hand. They're quite sharp. If I need to make a deeper chamfer I may chuck them in a hand operated egg-beater type drill.
    dremel cone.jpg
     
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  6. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Friend of Leo's

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    For chamfering, you can use a round ball abrasive grinding tip, either aluminum oxide (yellow or brown) or silicon carbide (blue) for chamfering holes, it's just grinding off a touch of finish at the surface and tends to stop when it hits the wood. Any other kind of bit meant for chamfering will actually keep digging as deep as you let it go.
     
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