Does That Clean Warm Atkins, Jazzy Sound Exist In A Modeller Or Magic Box?

Discussion in 'Modeling Amps, Plugins and Apps' started by Robkay, Mar 5, 2019.

  1. Robkay

    Robkay Tele-Meister

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    Is there any direct recording device that can create that sweet atkins, travis and jazzy tone?
    Rob(uk)
     
  2. 68tele

    68tele Tele-Afflicted

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    Found this on another forum:
    "According to Paul Yandell, who played with Chet and was his right hand man for over 20 years, Chet never used flatwounds - he described them as 'dead as a doornail, no sustain' and made a sound like 'there's a quilt over the amp'. Chet himself is quoted as saying, in 1979, that he used Gretsch "Chet Atkins Country Style Strings". He gave the gauges as .010, .012, .020 wound, .028, .038, .048 or .050.
    He used Peavey amps for a while then switched to Music Man amps, which were his favourites for touring, according to Yandell. He played through a 15 inch speaker. He used a Standell for most of his recordings but thought it wasn't robust enough to take on the road."

    The best 'device' would be employing really really great technique. Chet Atkins practiced for hours every day.
     
  3. Chicago Slim

    Chicago Slim Tele-Afflicted

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    I loved Chet's sound and I also owned some Music Man and Peavey amps. To me, the Vox Boutique Clean (Dumble) sim is very close. I've had it on an older AD50VT, and a new VXII, although it is somewhat limited by the 8" speaker. I can also get a similar sound from the Clean channel of my Katana's and my main tube amp, a Vox TB18C1, running 6V6's and an Eminence speaker.

    I would also attribute part of the sound to the 15" speaker. I don't think that the speaker sims work very well for clean sounds. The closest 12" speaker that I have found, is an Eminence Basslite.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
  4. bblumentritt

    bblumentritt Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    Not really...

    I had a prominent San Antonio 7-string jazz guitar player play through one of my amps, and comment, "Wow, I've forgotten how warm tubes sound."

    Steve Wariner offered these tips on how to sound like Chet Atkins. Stay pure: “Chet did not use a lot of processing. When I was touring with him he used a Lexicon rack mounted delay and the only other thing between his guitar and amp was a distortion pedal, like a Tube Screamer. Earlier I guess he used an Echo-Plex type of tape delay. And he rarely used that fuzz pedal. He would use it when we’d play a funky piece and he’d play one solo with it turned on. He also used a Music Man amp on tour. In the studio he had a vintage Standel amp that was once owned by the great steel guitar player Jimmy Day. It had a plaque with Jimmy’s name on the back.”

    Master vibrato: Atkins used heavy strings on the bass side of his guitar neck and light gauge strings for his top three notes. “He used those heavier strings to pick his bass lines with his thumb, so he could play bass and melody at the same time. He kept his vibrato arm set where he could lay his pinky over it, so he could dip it with his little finger. He was also a master of creating vibrato with the fingers of his left hand.”

    Pick clean: “So much of what Chet did was with his hands. He had amazing articulation on the guitar.

    His notes were always pure and clean and gorgeous. Chet had a reach and tone that was unreal. He had enormous hands, so he could play a chord by wrapping his left hand around the back of his guitar’s neck and pinning down a note with his thumb. He did that on his intro to ‘Mr. Sandman,’ and he’d tell me ‘Steve, why don’t you try it this way?’ And I’d say, ‘With my pudgy little hands? I can’t!’ ”

    Think old school: “For Chet, everything was in service of the melody. He could have played a lot of flashy licks, but he was really interested in playing music that everybody could enjoy, not just guitar players. So he would make sure the melody was always at the front of whatever he played.

    “He also liked to record with super clean amplifiers and ribbon mikes. One of his favorites was the RCA-77. If you’re really looking for authentic vintage tones, you’re going to need the vintage gear.”
     
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  5. JazzboxBlues

    JazzboxBlues Tele-Afflicted

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    You certainly can’t argue with this. Great advice!
     
  6. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Tele-Afflicted

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    There is, its called your ear. filter out everything that doesn't sound like the sound you want. It takes a while, its called work and practice.

    there are no magic guitars, magic pedals, or magic strings, there are some really goood guitar picks though.
     
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  7. kLyon

    kLyon Tele-Meister

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    I'm firmly in the camp of "the hands and the man make the sound," and believe that Chet Atkins could make anything sound good.
    But I will add this small detail: all of Chet's guitars had zero frets, not nuts.
    (Why they have been banished to second-tier status in the minds of many is beyond me...)
     
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  8. bblumentritt

    bblumentritt Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    Someone once commented to Chet, "That's a nice sounding guitar."

    Chet put the guitar down, and asked, "How does it sound now?"
     
  9. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    LOL.......I've experienced the same thing. Someone will come up to me on a gig, when I'm playing my obviously heavily modified Telecaster, and comment how good my guitar sounds. I usually just say "Thanks", and wonder if "I" have anything to do with it! ;)
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019 at 9:45 AM
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  10. cbeattyjr

    cbeattyjr TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

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    I think the clean jazzy sound is the easiest to get "in the box". Use the Fender Twin model in Amplitube 4 or Line 6 Helix Native. IMHO the guys who don't like modeling are playing hard rock or metal and miss the loud feel with gain through a speaker cabinet.
     
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  11. Robkay

    Robkay Tele-Meister

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    I was trying to improve on this sound, this was recorded about ten years ago and i thought with all this more modern gear there would be better solutions out there.....

    I'm thinking of downloading the helix native trial, not sure what to expect.
    Regards
    Rob(uk)
     
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  12. cbeattyjr

    cbeattyjr TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

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    Helix Native is very good for what you're looking for. Also Ampltitube 2 Fender Collections also.
     
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  13. Robkay

    Robkay Tele-Meister

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