Devil at the Crossroads -Netflix

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by blowtorch, May 7, 2019.

  1. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    RJ was a consolidator.

    He basically was a very, very good jack of all trades.

    It was like he offered an overview of what a bunch of artists had been doing for 10 yrs or so.

    By the time of his last recording session that style of music was essentially over.

    BTW (and I don’t know if they touched upon this in the doc) - almost all those guys were “bluesmen” on record only.

    Out on the streets and anywhere they performed “live” ? They were jukeboxes. Polkas, cowboy songs, hit parade - whatever made the money hit the cup/box/guitar case.

    Last arcane fact - the #1 selling blues artist of the 30’s ?

    Blind Boy Fuller.

    Crazy enough, when I went to Joe Bussard’s house to spin records for 4-5 hrs 10 yrs or so ago , I mentioned that to him and he remarked that mint BBF 78’s were common as dirt , then proceeded to play me one with nary a pop or scratch at 100 watts ! Joe liked them records loud.

    Here’s the doc you wanna see :

     
  2. Georox

    Georox Tele-Afflicted

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    Watched. Nothing new. Yawn.
     
  3. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Not sure what you guys who are critical of this expect to see.

    There just is relatively very little solid information available regarding RJ.
     
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  4. fendertx

    fendertx Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Fair point, I did abort half way through because I thought it was mostly rehash
     
  5. SlightReturn

    SlightReturn TDPRI Member

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    Thank you for reminding me of this film! I’m going to watch it again this week and I’m going to thoroughly enjoy it :)
     
  6. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    No devil/crossroads horses**t.

    That is an automatic disqualifier.

    It’s like doing a documentary on bats - and including Batman.
     
  7. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I think it's more like doing a documentary on gorillas and including the fact that they were originally thought to be mythical yeti-like beings
     
  8. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thanks for the tip....I'm gonna look for this in just a minute.
    As a related aside.....I've long believed Robert Johnson MAY have written Crossroad Blues in or about Ft Worth. Many references allude to Ft Worth, including street names that existed in the black community when he is supposed to have lived around here.
    "I went down to the crossroads..." the intersection of Rosedale and Evans was a "meeting" or convening location for the black neighborhoods. I've been down there, and there's a "vibe" that exists today, even though the social practices have changed, and folks don't collect there like they used to.
    "Well I'm goin' down to Rosedale....." another reference to the "crossroads" of Rosedale and Evans.
    "We can still buy a house, baby, down (on) the riverside...." possibly should read "....down on Riverside".....referring to Riverside Dr., another nearby street in that area.
    If Robert Johnson hadn't been known to live here for a while, I would chalk all this up to coincidence, but......who knows???!!!
     
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  9. elihu

    elihu Poster Extraordinaire

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    East Rosedale was a street you didn't want to be walking on after sunset. I used to be a home health nurse and i had the pleasure to help out a black lady dying of cancer who lived over in the Stop Six neighborhood. In the 1990's it was crack city with a lot of folks just out on the street staring. But nobody ever bothered me. And she turned me on to the Makaveli album by Tupac. I'm not really a rap fan but if there's a stronger album I haven't heard it.
     
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  10. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    I absolutely hear you about E.Rosedale, especially in the seventies, eighties and nineties. Much of it has gone through "urban revitalization" lately.....land is just too valuable to let go to waste.
    As a kid in the fifties, before the days of freeways, my parents had to drive Rosedale, E. Berry, and Vickery to get from our house (westside) to my grandparents. (near southside) On Sundays after church let out, E. Berry was just TEEMING with black folks, out socializing and visiting friends and family. The energy just FASCINATED a five or six year old kid like me.
     
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  11. elihu

    elihu Poster Extraordinaire

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    In the 90's I attended TCU and spent all spare time hanging at Record Town or playing in a blues band. I too was fascinated. I swear I learned more about black music from the jukebox at the Bluebird than from anywhere else. I mean, I've never heard ZZ Hill on the radio.
     
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  12. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    AHHH!....the Bluebird! ;););)
    The building is still there on Horne St.....but nothing's happening there anymore. My best friend in the seventies and eighties lived in an old house in Arlington Heights that was divided into three apartments. He lived above one of the guys from the Juke Jumpers, a wonderful blues band back then. They often backed up Robert Ealey when he played the Bluebird and other venues.
    Incidentally, Record Town was owned by the Bruton family, and Sumpter Bruton also played in the Juke Jumpers.
    Isn't Six Degrees of Separation fun?????
     
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  13. jackinjax

    jackinjax Friend of Leo's

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    I was expecting more music. All I got was a bunch of short snippets. Disappointed.
     
  14. Fearnot

    Fearnot Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah, I think that was my biggest disappointment... with only 29 songs, you’d think someone would dig down deep into 5 or 6 of them rather than crank out yet another rehash of the myth.

    But it is Netflix.
     
  15. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    and - it’s public domain (some places).

    There’s no excuse .
     
  16. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    They used the songs I think they figured would be most compelling, including "Red Hot" and "Come in my Kitchen"
     
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