Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Dealing with a scratch...

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Guitarteach, Apr 3, 2017.

  1. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 6, 2014
    UK
    I'm doing some work on an Ibanez S series I have.

    I've fixed a creaking locking nut but there is a small scratch on the body just behind the bridge.

    What is the best and simplest approach you suggest that can perhaps fix this? Is there a fill and polish approach?

    I have a similar scratch on an otherwise flawless '92 Ebony Gibson Les Paul

    IMG_3148.JPG
     

  2. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Tele-Holic

    Age:
    62
    905
    Apr 11, 2016
    Las Vegas, NV
    First step is determining what the finish actually is. The Les Paul, is most likely lacquer, so a drop fill, wet sand and polish, although black is a VERY unforgiving color, so it may never be invisible. I won't take the chance of embarrassing by asking if you made the scratches?
    Just Sayin'
    Gene
     

  3. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 6, 2014
    UK
    I assume poly on the Ibanez. It's thick clear gloss. I don't know what Gibson used on Standards in 92.

    One of my kids scratched the les paul about a week after I got it.

    The Ibanez was when I was working on it I think. Possibly a sharp burr on an Allen key.

    I'm usually not that bothered but both these are pretty guitars with single flaws.

    I've had at the Ibanez with coloured auto cutting polish and it seems to have helped a bit.
     

  4. tmazzullo

    tmazzullo TDPRI Member

    72
    Nov 22, 2013
    Denver, CO
    I've had really good luck drop filling scratches like that on poly with water thin superglue, leveling with a blade, then 1000, 2000 grit and buffing with polishing compound. Let the superglue dry really hard, couple of hours or overnight.
     
    Cat MacKinnon likes this.

  5. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Friend of Leo's

    Sep 15, 2007
    Glen Head, NY
    The LP scratch might be fixable, or at least made to be less noticeable, with butyl cell-o-solve, which is a trade name for a solvent mix that's usually sold as lacquer retarder. You put the tiniest amount on with a small artist's brush (even less than what you might apply with a toothpick) and it turns the white scratch into a clear scratch. Then if you really want it to go away, nitro can always be drop-filled and buffed. I believe Gibson prides themselves on always using something that they could still market as "nitro".
     

  6. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 6, 2014
    UK
    Thanks. I might test the superglue idea under the spring cavity on the Ibanez to see if I can do it.

    I will see if I can find the lacquer retarder or a clear lacquer here for the LP
     

  7. DonM

    DonM Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    893
    Apr 21, 2016
    Henderson,NV/SLC,UT
    I fixed a light scratch on one of mine recently with an automotive clear-coat repair pen. It's the stuff you put on and then let sit in the sun to cure. Seems to have worked pretty good.
     

  8. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 6, 2014
    UK
    Cool. I was thinking about that.
     
    DonM likes this.

  9. DonM

    DonM Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    893
    Apr 21, 2016
    Henderson,NV/SLC,UT
    Yeah, if it hasn't gone deep into the paint it seems to work ok.
     

  10. Cat MacKinnon

    Cat MacKinnon Friend of Leo's

    Nov 13, 2011
    Colorado
    On poly finishes I usually use CA of some sort (usually thin or medium, but I don't think viscosity matters much for scratch filling.) You want to fill it a little higher than the factory finish, then carefully scrape it flush, then go through the sanding and buffing to blend it in. Especially on a non-black finish it'll be pretty invisible. The UV-cured auto clear coat pen sounds like it might be a good option too, although I've never tried it.

    For the LP you can reflow the lacquer with lacquer thinner or retarder (or even just a little more clear lacquer), using a fine paintbrush. If it's a deeper scratch, you'd probably be better off drop-filling it with lacquer (same as above: fill it higher than the surrounding finish, then sand/polish/buff to blend it it.)

    CA will dry pretty quickly and you can get the whole thing filled and buffed out in a few hours. A lacquer drop-fill should dry at least overnight, but a couple-few days is better. Some people like using CA accelerator when they drop-fill with CA, but I avoid it because it causes the glue to dry cloudy/white and sometimes you can't get rid of that without sanding it off. It should only take about 20 minutes for each drop-fill layer of CA to dry though, so it's still a pretty fast process without accelerator.
     

  11. Telebrian

    Telebrian Tele-Meister

    155
    Nov 10, 2013
    Miami
    Hello,

    I just purchased a used fender and has quite a bit of scratches on the back of the guitar. So you're saying to use a superglue or lacquer to fill the scratches, then buff? What buff compound do you recommend? It's a black strat. Maybe these scratches are too busy to deal with... Here's a couple of pics.
     

    Attached Files:


IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.