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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Danelectro U1 convertible bridge question

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by Tempest, Nov 17, 2016.

  1. Tempest

    Tempest TDPRI Member

    Age:
    36
    14
    Jul 22, 2016
    Greece
    Hello to everybody.

    This is my first post in the forum. I have been watching the forum for a while though.
    My main question is regarding the Danelectro original bridge. I am currently building a U1 version with "f hole" and a piezo in the bridge like the convertible. I will go with the standard U1 bridge and not the bridge that the convertible models use.

    Here is my question.

    As far as I have seen the bridge has only 3 screws. One at the bottom and two at the front. From what I understand, only the bottom screw holds the bridge in place where the other two just help adjusting the action. Is this correct? If yes, is only one screw able to hold the strings tension, or am I missing something?

    Any help is much appreciated since I have a DIY fever and I want to make everything myself and not buy stuff, except from the pickups.

    Here are some pics of my work so far.

    Harry.
     

    Attached Files:


  2. VintageSG

    VintageSG Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Mar 31, 2016
    Huddersfield, UK
    You are correct as to how the Danelectro bridge works, and work it does. The rear screw holds the bridge on and it rests on the front two for action adjustment. I've never had issues with mine regarding the screws.
     

  3. Andy B

    Andy B Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Mar 16, 2003
    Colorado
    They have worked fine for me also. I've owned a number of them over the years.
     

  4. jayyj

    jayyj Tele-Holic

    753
    Jul 13, 2014
    Manchester, UK
    Your work in progress looks great!

    Here's a few photos of the original Dano three screw bridge:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If you look at the holes, the front two are drilled so that they're smaller at the top than at the bottom: the screw heads sit in the recess rather passing through so that when you turn them with a screwdriver from the top the screw head pushes up in the bridge and raises it. The rear screw is countersunk from the top, so the screw passes through the bridge and pulls down on it when turned.

    It should be easy enough to replicate but if you go with this style make sure you have a stiff piece of metal so that it doesn't sag in the middle - many of the reissues suffer from this problem.

    The Convertible bridge is made of a block of rosewood with a fret wire saddle, with three small screws attaching it to the top. It's not as good a design as the traditional metal bridge although if you substituted a bone saddle for the fret wire one it might be a good way to fit a piezo. I once built a tenor guitar with one of those Convertible style bridges and a transducer built into it and hated the sound of it, and I don't think the modern Convertibles sound particularly great as an acoustic. If it were me I'd be tempted to go with the metal bridge and look set something like the Shadow Nanomag for acoustic tones.
     
    Tempest likes this.

  5. Tempest

    Tempest TDPRI Member

    Age:
    36
    14
    Jul 22, 2016
    Greece
    Thank you very much for the really informative photos! They really helped a lot. They verify my original thought that the two front screws have to contribute somehow to holding the bridge in place form the pulling of the strings. That is why they are countersunk from the down side so that the bridge does not only sit on them but also is held by them.

    Regarding the sound of the piezo and the bridge.... I am going to install the standard rosewood bridge that U models use, just maybe slightly thicker so that to fit the piezo underneath in place. I also am going to use an Orman buffer in order to match the piezo's impedance to the magnetic pickup's impedance. I am also thinking of installing a black ice mod (also DIY circuit) in the guitar with an on off switch.

    I will see. I am not expecting much from this guitar, especially since it is my first electric! Still I have enjoyed building it a lot this far!
     
    jayyj likes this.

  6. Flaneur

    Flaneur Friend of Leo's

    May 24, 2010
    Scotland
    Hi Harry, glad to see you started posting. Please start a thread about your Dano build; I'm sure a lot of members would love to see it progress. :)
     

  7. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Feb 29, 2004
    Portland, OR
    +1, that red for some reason made me go Gah!.
     

  8. Tempest

    Tempest TDPRI Member

    Age:
    36
    14
    Jul 22, 2016
    Greece

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